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  1. Frederick Adams (1991). Mind-Body Identity Theories. Teaching Philosophy 14 (4):433-436.
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  2. Varol Akman, Reading McDermott.
    The author is interested in computational approaches to consciousness. His reason for working in the field of AI is to solve the mind-body problem, that is, to understand how the brain can have experiences. This is an intricate project because it involves elucidation of the relationship between our mentality and its physical foundation. How can a biological/chemical system (the human body) have experiences, beliefs, desires, intentions, and so on? Physicists have good reasons to persuade us that ours is a material (...)
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  3. Colin Allen (2011). Methodological Questions Begged. Behavior and Philosophy 39 (40):83 - 87.
    I argue in opposition to Sam Rakover that the current lack of fully adequate theories of the subjective and qualitative aspects of mind does not justify the adoption of what he calls “methodological dualism” (Rakover, this issue). Scientific understanding of consciousness requires the continuation of attempts to explain it in terms of the neural mechanisms that support it. It would be premature to adopt a methodological stance that could foreclose on the possibility of more reductionistic approaches. The effects of such (...)
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  4. Holly K. Andersen (2010). Mental Causation: The Mind-Body Problem. By Anthony Dardis. Metaphilosophy 41 (3):450-455.
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  5. G. E. M. Anscombe (1981). Metaphysics and the Philosophy of Mind, Collected Philosophical Papers Vol. Ii. Basil Blackwell.
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  6. Louise Antony (2010). Realization Theory and the Philosophy of Mind: Comments on Sydney Shoemaker's Physical Realization. Philosophical Studies 148 (1):89 - 99.
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  7. R. J. B. (1969). The "Mental" and the "Physical.". Review of Metaphysics 22 (4):752-752.
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  8. A. Bailey (1997). Rocco J. Gennaro, Mind and Brain: A Dialogue on the Mind-Body Problem. Journal of Consciousness Studies 4:276-276.
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  9. Alexander Bain (1873). Mind and Body: The Theories of Their Relation. London,H. S. King & Co., 1873] Farnborough, Eng., Gregg International.
  10. Lynne Rudder Baker (1995). The Nature of True Minds. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 55 (2):475-478.
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  11. Marcello Barbieri (2006). Semantic Biology and the Mind?Body Problem: The Theory of the Conventional Mind. Biological Theory 1 (4):352-356.
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  12. J. Barresi (1999). Marleen Rozemond, Descartes's Dualism. Journal of Consciousness Studies 6:92-93.
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  13. J. Barresi (1996). Daniel Dennett, Kinds of Mind. Journal of Consciousness Studies 3:532-534.
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  14. George Bealer (2009). The Self-Consciousness Argument : Functionalism and the Corruption of Intentional Content. In Robert C. Koons & George Bealer (eds.), The Waning of Materialism: New Essays. Oxford University Press.
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  15. William Bechtel, Molecules, Systems, and Behavior: Another View of Memory Consolidation.
    From its genesis in the 1960s, the focus of inquiry in neuroscience has been on the cellular and molecular processes underlying neural activity. In this pursuit neuroscience has been enormously successful. Like any successful scientific inquiry, initial successes have raised new questions that inspire ongoing research. While there is still much that is not known about the molecular processes in brains, a great deal of very important knowledge has been secured, especially in the last 50 years. It has also attracted (...)
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  16. Bertil Belfrage (2007). Berkeley's Four Concepts of the Soul (1707-1709). In Stephen H. Daniel (ed.), Reexamining Berkeley's Philosophy.
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  17. Hagit Benbaji (2010). Token Monism, Event Dualism and Overdetermination. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 40 (1):pp. 63-81.
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  18. D. J. Bierman (1996). Mind, Machines and Paranormal Phenomena: A Rejoinder to Beloffs Radical Dualist Perspective. Journal of Consciousness Studies 3 (5-6):5-6.
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  19. R. Bissell (1997). Fred Dretske, Naturalizing the Mind. Journal of Consciousness Studies 4:274-275.
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  20. David Boadella (1987). Lifestreams: An Introduction to Biosynthesis. Routledge & Kegan Paul.
    CHAPTER EMOTIONAL EXPRESSION AND THE BODY The language of bio -energy It must be recognised at the outset that it is impossible for an individual not to ...
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  21. David Braddon-Mitchell & Robert Nola (eds.) (2009). Conceptual Analysis and Philosophical Naturalism. Mit Press.
    A new program of philosophical analysis that reconciles a certain account of analysis with philosophical naturalism is applied to a range of philosophical ...
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  22. Myles Brand (1981). A Particularist Theory of Events. Grazer Philosophische Studien 12:187-202.
    Events are unstructured particulars and their identity conditions are to be stated in terms of necessary spatiotemporal coincidence. In contrast, Davidson says that events are unstructured particulars, with their identity conditions to be given in terms of sameness of causes and effects; and Kim says that events are structured particulars, with their identity conditions to be given in terms of sameness of their constituents. The consequences of my view are then traced for mental events.
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  23. Manuel Bremer (2008). David Smith and Amie Thomasson, Editors, Phenomenology and Philosophy of Mind. Minds and Machines 18 (3):417-419.
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  24. Mario Augusto Bunge (1980). The Mind-Body Problem: A Psychobiological Approach. Pergamon Press.
  25. Alex Byrne (1993). The Emergent Mind. Dissertation, Princeton University
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  26. Keith Campbell (2008). Review of Simone Gozzano, Francesco Orilia (Eds.), Tropes, Universals and the Philosophy of Mind: Essays at the Boundary of Ontology and Philosophical Psychology. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2008 (8).
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  27. H. Wildon Carr (1920). Dr. Wildon Carr's Theory of the Relation of Mind and Body. Journal of Philosophy, Psychology and Scientific Methods 17 (21):579-580.
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  28. Richard L. Cartwright (1968). Propositions Again. Noûs 2 (3):229-246.
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  29. Chung-ying Cheng (ed.) (1975). Philosophical Aspects of the Mind-Body Problem: [Proceedings]. University Press of Hawaii.
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  30. Noam Chomsky (1994). Naturalism and Dualism in the Study of Language and Mind. International Journal of Philosophical Studies 2 (2):181 – 209.
    (1994). Naturalism and dualism in the study of language and mind. International Journal of Philosophical Studies: Vol. 2, No. 2, pp. 181-209. doi: 10.1080/09672559408570790.
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  31. Arkadiusz Chrudzimski (2005). Intentionalität, Zeitbewusstsein Und Intersubjektivität. Studien Zur Phänomenologie von Brentano Bis Ingarden. Ontos.
    Studien zur Phänomenologie von Brentano bis Ingarden Arkadiusz Chrudzimski. Husserl, Edmund 1908. Vorlesungen über Bedeutungslehre. Sommersemester I 908 (Husserliana XXVI, hrsg. von U. Panzer), Dordrecht/Boston/Lancaster 1987 ...
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  32. Andy Clark (2008). Supersizing the Mind: Embodiment, Action, and Cognitive Extension. Oxford University Press.
    Introduction : brainbound versus extended -- From embodiment to cognitive extension -- The active body -- The negotiable body -- Material symbols -- World, Incorporated -- Boundary disputes -- Mind re-bound -- The cure for cognitive hiccups (HEMC, HEC, HEMC ...) -- Rediscovering the brain -- The limits of embodiment -- Painting, planning, and perceiving -- Disentangling embodiment -- Conclusions : mind-sized bites.
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  33. Michael Clark (1966). Review of R. Grossman, The Structure of Mind. [REVIEW] Philosophical Quarterly 16.
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  34. Brian Cooney (ed.) (2000). The Place of Mind. Wadsworth Thomson Learning.
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  35. Joseph Corabi (2011). Why the Evolutionary Argument is Not Really an Evolutionary Argument After All. Journal of Consciousness Studies 18 (3-4):3-4.
    The evolutionary argument is one of the most well-known empirical arguments against epiphenomenalism. In its most persuasive form, it aims to show that because of evolutionary considerations, the smooth correlations between painful qualia and noxious stimuli would be highly unexpected if epiphenomenalism were true, but just what we would expect if an alternative mind--body theory were. Thus, the presence of these correlations is strong evidence against epiphenomenalism. After formulating a canonical version of the argument, I demonstrate that the evolutionary evidence (...)
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  36. Allin Cottrell (1999). Sniffing the Camembert: On the Conceivability of Zombies. Journal of Consciousness Studies 6 (1):4-12.
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  37. Tim Crane, Introduction: The Mental and the Physical.
    The theme of these is essays is what might be called, rather ambitiously, the nature of the human mind. Psychologists and philosophers both investigate the nature of the mind, but from rather different angles. Psychologists and neuroscientists investigate the actual mechanisms in the brain, the body and the world which underpin mental events and processes. Philosophers, by contrast, ask more abstract questions: for example, about what makes any process mental at all, or how mental reality fits into the rest of (...)
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  38. Sean Crawford (ed.) (2010). Philosophy of Mind: Critical Concepts in Philosophy. Routledge.
    v. 1. Foundations -- v. 2. The mind-body problem -- v. 3. Intentionality -- v. 4. Consciousness.
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  39. Christian de Quincey (2000). Conceiving the 'Inconceivable'? Fishing for Consciousness with a Net of Miracles. Journal of Consciousness Studies 7 (4):67-81.
    Sometimes, after years of painstaking work, someone presents a startling argument that seems to suddenly snatch the ground right out from under your feet. And it's back to square one. Such a conceptual trapdoor caught me by surprise a few years ago. For decades, I had been convinced it is simply inconceivable that subjectivity -- the interior experience of how consciousness feels -- could possibly emerge from a previously wholly objective world, that mind could evolve from ‘dead’ matter. It seemed (...)
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  40. Christian De Quincey (2000). The Promise of Integralism. A Critical Appreciation of Ken Wilber's Integral Psychology. Journal of Consciousness Studies 7 (11-12):11-12.
    Why do so many people think Ken Wilber is one of the most important thinkers of our time? Why are so many disturbed by what he writes? In this review of his work, I hope to throw some light on both questions.
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  41. José-Luis Diaz (2000). Mind-Body Unity, Dual Aspect, and the Emergence of Consciousness. Philosophical Psychology 13 (3):393 – 403.
    Dual aspect theory has conceptual advantages over alternative mind-body notions, but difficulties of its own. The nature of the underlying psychophysical ground, for one, remains problematic either in terms of the principle of complementarity or if mind and matter are taken to be aspects of something like energy, movement, or information. Moreover, for a dual aspect theory to be plausible it should avoid the four perils of all mind-body theories: epiphenomenalism, reductionism, gross panpsychism, and the problems of emergence. An alternative (...)
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  42. E. Diaz-Leon (2012). Actors Are Not Like Zombies. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 112 (1pt1):115-122.
    Daniel Stoljar has recently argued that comparing the zombie argument against physicalism with another influential argument in philosophy of mind, namely, the actor argument against behaviourism, can help to show why recent objections to the zombie argument fail. In this note I want to argue that the zombie argument and the actor argument have important differences, and, because of that, Stoljar's objections to some recent critiques of the zombie argument are not successful.
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  43. Frank Dickinson (1929). Dualism and Functionalism.
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  44. Foad Dizadji-Bahmani, Roman Frigg & Stephan Hartmann (2010). Who's Afraid of Nagelian Reduction? Erkenntnis 73 (3):393-412.
    We reconsider the Nagelian theory of reduction and argue that, contrary to a widely held view, it is the right analysis of intertheoretic reduction, since the alleged difficulties of the theory either vanish upon closer inspection or turn out to be substantive philosophical questions rather than knock-down arguments.
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  45. Tyler Doggett & Daniel Stoljar (2010). Does Nagel's Footnote Eleven Solve the Mind-Body Problem? Philosophical Issues 20 (1):125-143.
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  46. Durant Drake (1923). The Mind-Body Impasse. Philosophical Review 32 (2):221-228.
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  47. Hans Driesch (1927). Mind and Body. London, Methuen.
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  48. Homer H. Dubs (1929). The Psychophysical Problem-A Neglected Solution. The Monist 39 (1):121-125.
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  49. Mircea Dumitru (2008). Conceivability and Possibility. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 42:53-60.
    Explaining phenomenal consciousness may be the scientific and philosophical problem of our time, the last frontier of knowledge. This is not at all an easy task. For any serious attempt at finding a place for consciousness within the natural world was not successful so far. There is a conceptual tension here which makes this business of coming up with a unified (monist) explanation of mind and physical world one of the most intriguing mystery. The most predominant image of the natural (...)
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  50. Antony Eagle, Mind and Body.
    Characteristic mental states including thinking about going on holiday, desiring to eat a peach, feeling sad, and believing that that Australia will win the world cup. Mental states are intentional (about other things) and we have privileged access to them.
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