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  1. Klaus Abels (2013). Comments on Hornstein. Mind and Language 28 (4):421-429.
  2. Irene Appelbaum (1999). The Dogma of Isomorphism: A Case Study From Speech Perception. Philosophy of Science 66 (3):S250-S259.
    In this paper I provide a metatheoretical analysis of speech perception research. I argue that the central turning point in the history of speech perception research has not been well understood. While it is widely thought to mark a decisive break with what I call "the alphabetic conception of speech," I argue that it instead marks the entrenchment of this conception of speech. In addition, I argue that the alphabetic conception of speech continues to underwrite speech perception research today and (...)
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  3. Mary Bazire & Patrick Brézillon (2005). Understanding Context Before Using It. In B. Kokinov A. Dey (ed.), Modeling and Using Context. Springer 29--40.
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  4. T. Bearth (2001). Antoine Culioli: Cognition and Representation in Linguistic Theory. Pragmatics and Cognition 9 (1):135-146.
  5. Thomas G. Bever (ed.) (1984). Talking Minds: The Study Of Language In The Cognitive Sciences. Cambridge: MIT Press.
  6. L. Bloomfield & Joseph F. Kess (1985). An Introduction to the Study of Language. Tijdschrift Voor Filosofie 47 (2):337-337.
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  7. C. Boeckx & N. Hornstein (2007). Les differents objectifs de la linguistique theorique. In Jean Bricmont & Julie Franck (eds.), Cahier Chomsky. L'herne 61--77.
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  8. Cedric Boeckx (2006). Linguistic Minimalism: Origins, Concepts, Methods, and Aims. Oxford University Press Uk.
    The Minimalist Program for linguistic theory is Noam Chomsky's boldest and most radical version of his naturalistic approach to language. Cedric Boeckz examines its foundations, explains its underlying philosophy, exemplifies its methods, and considers the significance of its empirical results. He explores the roots and antecedents of the Program and shows how its methodologies parallel those of sciences such as physics and biology. He disentangles and clarifies current debates and issues around the nature of minimalist research in linguistics and shows (...)
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  9. Cecil H. Brown (1974). Wittgensteinian Linguistics. Mouton.
  10. Marc Brysbaert & Don C. Mitchell (2003). Syntactic Form Frequencies: Assessing. In L. Nadel (ed.), Encyclopedia of Cognitive Science. Nature Publishing Group 316--318.
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  11. J. Bucklew (1941). An Experimental Set-Up for the Investigation of Language Problems. Journal of Experimental Psychology 28 (6):534.
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  12. Nancy Budwig (2004). The Contributions of the Interdisciplinary Study of Language to an Understanding of Mind. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (1):101-102.
    Carpendale & Lewis (C&L) emphasize the importance of viewing language as activity. In this commentary I push further their claim by highlighting how constructions, rather than words, are the appropriate unit of analysis. In addition, I suggest how a discussion of indexicality paves the way for a better understanding of how language provides a powerful tool for children's construction of mind.
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  13. Frank Cabrera (forthcoming). Cladistic Parsimony, Historical Linguistics, and Cultural Phylogenetics. Mind and Language.
    Here, I consider the recent application of phylogenetic methods in historical linguistics. After a preliminary survey of one such method, i.e. cladistic parsimony, I respond to two common criticisms of cultural phylogenies: (1) that cultural artifacts cannot be modeled as tree-like because of borrowing across lineages, and (2) that the mechanism of cultural change differs radically from that of biological evolution. I argue that while perhaps (1) remains true for certain cultural artifacts, the nature of language may be such as (...)
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  14. Barbora Geistova Cakovska (2011). Problem Identity of Linguistic Expressions and Synonymy Relations in Terms of Logical, Linguistic and Pragmatic Semantics. Organon F: Medzinárodný Časopis Pre Analytickú Filozofiu 18:115-125.
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  15. Nick Chater & Morten H. Christiansen (2007). Two Views of Simplicity in Linguistic Theory: Which Connects Better with Cognitive Science? Trends in Cognitive Sciences 11 (8):324-326.
  16. Noam Chomsky (2005). Language and Mind : Current Thoughts on Ancient Problems. In Anjum P. Saleemi, Ocke-Schwen Bohn & Albert Gjedde (eds.), In Search of a Language for the Mind-Brain: Can the Multiple Perspectives Be Unified? Aarhus University Press ;
  17. Noam Chomsky (1994). Naturalism and Dualism in the Study of Language and Mind. International Journal of Philosophical Studies 2 (2):181 – 209.
  18. Noam Chomsky (1975). The Logical Structure of Linguistic Theory. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
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  19. Noam Chomsky (1970). Problems of Explanation in Linguistics. In Robert Borger (ed.), Explanation in the Behavioural Sciences. Cambridge University Press 425--451.
  20. Noam Chomsky (1965). Aspects of the Theory of Syntax. The MIT Press.
    Chomsky proposes a reformulation of the theory of transformational generative grammar that takes recent developments in the descriptive analysis of particular ...
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  21. Noam A. Chomsky (1976). Reflections On Language. Temple Smith.
  22. John Collins (2013). The Philosophy of Generative Linguistics, by Peter Ludlow. Mind 122 (488):1150-1156.
  23. John Collins, Robert J. Matthews, Barry C. Smith & Brian Epstein (2008). Philosophy of Linguistics. Croatian Journal of Philosophy 8 (22).
  24. Linguistic Competence (1985). N. Chomsky. In Jerrold J. Katz (ed.), The Philosophy of Linguistics. Oxford University Press 80.
  25. Christopher Culy (1985). The Complexity of the Vocabulary of Bambara. Linguistics and Philosophy 8 (3):345 - 351.
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  26. Norman Daniels (1980). On Some Methods of Ethics and Linguistics. Philosophical Studies 37 (1):21 - 36.
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  27. Hayley G. Davis (2003). Rethinking Linguistics. Routledgecurzon.
    This book deals with the need to rethink the aims and methods of contemporary linguistics. Orthodox linguists' discussions of linguistic form fail to exemplify how language users become language makers. Integrationist theory is used here as a solution to this basic problem within general linguistics. The book is aimed at an interdisciplinary readership, comprising those engaged in study, teaching and research in the humanities and social sciences, including linguistics, philosophy, sociology and psychology.
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  28. Christina De Sanctis, Fabio Tanburini & Edoardo Zamuner, Identifying Phrasal Connectives in Italian Using Quantitative Methods.
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  29. Michael Devitt (2008). Explanation and Reality in Linguistics. Croatian Journal of Philosophy 8 (2):203-231.
    This paper defends Some anti-Chomskian themes in Ignorance of Language (Devitt 2006a) from, the criticisms of John Collins (2007, 2008a) and Georges Rey (2008). It argues that there is a linguistic reality external to the mind and that it is theoretically interesting to study it. If there is this reality, we have good reason to think that grammars are more or less true of it. So, the truth of the grammar of a language entails that its rules govern linguistic reality, (...)
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  30. Michael Devitt (2008). Methodology in the Philosophy of Linguistics. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 86 (4):671 – 684.
  31. Michael Devitt (2006). Intuitions in Linguistics. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 57 (3):481-513.
    Linguists take the intuitive judgments of speakers to be good evidence for a grammar. Why? The Chomskian answer is that they are derived by a rational process from a representation of linguistic rules in the language faculty. The paper takes a different view. It argues for a naturalistic and non-Cartesian view of intuitions in general. They are empirical central-processor responses to phenomena differing from other such responses only in being immediate and fairly unreflective. Applying this to linguistic intuitions yields an (...)
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  32. Michael Devitt & Kim Sterelny (1989). Linguistics: What's Wrong with "the Right View". Philosophical Perspectives 3:497-531.
  33. J. Dickins (1998). Extended Axiomatic Linguistics. Mouton De Gruyter.
    This volume presents the semiotic and linguistic theory of extended axiomatic functionalism, focusing on its application to linguistic description.
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  34. Robert M. W. Dixon (1963). Linguistic Science and Logic. Mouton.
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  35. B. Elan Dresher (2005). 5 Chomsky and Halle's Revolution in Phonology. In James A. McGilvray (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Chomsky. Cambridge University Press 102.
  36. Shimon Edelman, Rich Syntax From a Raw Corpus: Unsupervised Does It.
    We compare our model of unsupervised learning of linguistic structures, ADIOS [1], to some recent work in computational linguistics and in grammar theory. Our approach resembles the Construction Grammar in its general philosophy (e.g., in its reliance on structural generalizations rather than on syntax projected by the lexicon, as in the current generative theories), and the Tree Adjoining Grammar in its computational characteristics (e.g., in its apparent affinity with Mildly Context Sensitive Languages). The representations learned by our algorithm are truly (...)
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  37. Paul Egré (2015). Explanation in Linguistics. Philosophy Compass 10 (7):451-462.
    The aim of the present paper is to understand what the notions of explanation and prediction in contemporary linguistics mean, and to compare various aspects that the notion of explanation encompasses in that domain. The paper is structured around an opposition between three main styles of explanation in linguistics, which I propose to call ‘grammatical’, ‘functional’, and ‘historical’. Most of this paper is a comparison between these different styles of explanations and their relations. A second, more methodological aspect this paper (...)
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  38. Jeff Elman (2006). Computational Approaches to Language Acquisition. In Encyclopedia of Language and Linguistics. 2--726.
  39. Jeffrey L. Elman (1995). Language as a Dynamical System. In Tim van Gelder & Robert Port (eds.), Mind as Motion: Explorations in the Dynamics of Cognition. MIT Press 195--223.
  40. Christina Erneling (1997). Cognitive Science and the Study of Language. In David Martel Johnson & Christina E. Erneling (eds.), The Future of the Cognitive Revolution. Oxford University Press 115.
  41. Daniel L. Everett (1994). The Sentential Divide in Language and Cognition: On the Pragmatics of Word Order Flexibility and Related Issues. [REVIEW] Pragmatics and Cognitionpragmatics and Cognition 2 (1):131-166.
    Some linguists have argued that sentences should not be studied in isolation. They argue, rather, that the structure of sentences is largely the result of constraints imposed upon them by the discourses they are embedded in. I want to argue that this approach is misguided and that sentence-level syntax and discourse structure constitute distinct domains of study, at least in part because grammar is underdetermined by function. Moreover, I argue that discourse and sentence structures illustrate two types of cognition, dynamic (...)
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  42. Gareth Fitzgerald (2009). Linguistic Intuitions (British Journal for the Philosophy of Science). British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 61 (1):123-160.
    This paper defends an orthodox model of the linguistic intuitions which form a central source of evidence for generative grammars. According to this orthodox conception, linguistic intuitions are the upshot of a system of grammatical competence as it interacts with performance systems for perceiving and articulating language. So conceived, probing speakers’ linguistic intuitions allows us to investigate the competence–performance distinction empirically, so as to determine the grammars that speakers are competent in. This model has been attacked by Michael Devitt in (...)
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  43. Jerry Fodor & Ernie Lepore, Reply: Impossible Words.
    It matters to a number of projects whether monomorphemic lexical items (‘boy’, ‘cat’, ‘give’, ‘break’, etc.) have internal linguistic structure. (Call the theory that they do the Decomposition Hypothesis (DC).) The cognitive science consensus is, overwhelmingly, that DC is true; for example, that there is a level of grammar at which ‘breaktr’ has the structure ‘cause to breakint’ and so forth. We find this consensus surprising since, as far as we can tell, there is practically no evidence to support it. (...)
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  44. L. Fontainedevisscher (1988). Linguistics and the Human-Sciences-Redefining Linguistics with Hagege, Claude. Revue Philosophique De Louvain 86 (71):378-392.
  45. Bruce W. Fraser (2001). Syntax, Semantics, and the Justification of Linguistic Methodology: An Investigation Into the Source and Nature of the Disagreement Between Noam Chomsky and W. V. O. Quine. [REVIEW] Dissertation, Boston University
    This study investigates the ways in which Noam Chomsky and W. V. O. Quine view the relationship between formal grammars and natural languages, how their respective philosophical commitments shape their views, and whether or not we, their readers, have a basis for adjudicating between differences of opinion about the nature of grammar. I first argue that a popular reading of Quine's position which turns on his allegiance to behaviorism is problematic and based on a misconception. Quine's behaviorism must be distinguished (...)
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  46. R. Freidin (1988). Connectionism and the Study of Language. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 11 (1):34.
  47. Robert Freidin (2009). A Note on Methodology in Linguistics. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 32 (5):454-455.
    Evans & Levinson's (E&L's) critique of Universal Grammar fails because their methodology is flawed, as illustrated in their discussion of the Subjacency Condition. The lack of explicit analysis leads the authors to a false conclusion that is refuted by work published in this journal twenty years ago. They miss the point that unanalyzed data cannot disprove grammatical hypotheses.
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  48. A. Fromkin (1991). Language and Brain: Redefining the Goals and Methodology of Linguistics. In Aka Kasher (ed.), The Chomskyan Turn. Basil Blackwell 79.
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  49. Riccardo Fusaroli & Kristian Tylen (2012). Carving Language for Social Coordination: A Dynamical Approach. Interaction Studies 13 (1):103-124.
    Human social coordination is often mediated by language. Through verbal dialogue, people direct each other's attention to properties of their shared environment, they discuss how to jointly solve problems, share their introspections, and distribute roles and assignments. In this article, we propose a dynamical framework for the study of the coordinative role of language. Based on a review of a number of recent experimental studies, we argue that shared symbolic patterns emerge and stabilize through a process of local reciprocal linguistic (...)
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  50. Merrill Garrett & Jerry A. Fodor (1968). Psychological Theories and Linguistic Constructs. In T. Dixon & Deryck Horton (eds.), Verbal Behavior and General Behavior Theory. Prentice-Hall 451--477.
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