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  1. Barbara Abbott (1980). "Making Sense" by Geoffrey Sampson. [REVIEW] Linguistics and Philosophy 4:437.
  2. Kent Bach (2006). Review of Christopher Potts, The Logic of Conventional Implicatures. Journal of Linguistics 42 (2).
    Paul Grice warned that ‘the nature of conventional implicature needs to be examined before any free use of it, for explanatory purposes, can be indulged in’ (1978/1989: 46). Christopher Potts heeds this warning, brilliantly and boldly. Starting with a definition drawn from Grice’s few brief remarks on the subject, he distinguishes conventional implicature from other phenomena with which it might be confused, identifies a variety of common but little-studied kinds of expressions that give rise to it, and develops a formal, (...)
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  3. Gustav Bergmann (1952). Two Types of Linguistic Philosophy. Review of Metaphysics 5 (3):417 - 438.
  4. D. E. Bradshaw (1998). Meaning, Cognition, and the Philosophy of Thought. Journal of Philosophical Research 23:51-80.
    Michael Dummett has claimed that analytic philosophy is distinguished from other schools in its belief that a comprehensive philosophical account of thought can only be attained by developing a philosophical account of language. Dummett himself argues persuasively for the priority-of-Ianguage thesis. This, in effect, metaphilosophical position is of special importance for his more straightforwardly philosophical views, for he holds that philosophical investigations of the concepts of objectivity and reality grow directly out of the philosophy of thought. But I argue that (...)
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  5. Robyn Carston (1987). Multiple Review. Mind and Language 2 (4):333-349.
    Gavagai! or the Future History of the Animal Language Controversy. By DAVID PREMACK.
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  6. S. A. Clark, M. S. Seidenberg & M. C. MacDonald (1999). A Probabilistic Constraints Approach to Language Acquisition and Processing-Influences of Content-Based Expectations. Cognitive Science 23 (4):569-588.
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  7. Bernard Comrie (1994). Linguistic Purism. By George Thomas.(Studies in Language and Linguistics.) London & New York: Longman, 1992. Pp. XIII, 250. [REVIEW] In Stephen Everson (ed.), Language. Cambridge University Press 70--4.
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  8. Erica Cosentino & Francesco Ferretti (2014). Communication as Navigation: A New Role for Consciousness in Language. Topoi 33 (1):263-274.
    Classical cognitive science has been characterized by an association with the computational theory of mind. Although this association has produced highly significant results, it has also limited the scope of scientific psychology. In this paper, we analyse the limits of the specific kind of computational model represented by the Chomskian-Fodorian tradition in the study of mind and language. In our opinion, the adhesion to the principle of formality imposed by this specific computational model has motivated the exclusion of consciousness in (...)
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  9. Stephen J. Cowley (2012). Linguistic Fire and Human Cognitive Powers. Pragmatics and Cognition 20 (2):275-294.
    To view language as a cultural tool challenges much of what claims to be linguistic science while opening up a new people-centred linguistics. On this view, how we speak, think and act depends on, not just brains (or minds), but also cultural traditions. Yet, Everett is conservative: like others trained in distributional analysis, he reifies `words'. Though rejecting inner languages and grammatical universals, he ascribes mental reality to a lexicon . Reliant as he is on transcriptions, he takes the cognitivist (...)
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  10. Helen Cruz (2009). Is Linguistic Determinism an Empirically Testable Hypothesis? Logique Et Analyse 52.
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  11. Basile G. D'Ouakil (1940). Foundations of Language. Thought: A Journal of Philosophy 15 (3):534-535.
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  12. Michael Devitt (2011). Coming to Our Senses: A Naturalistic Program for Semantic Localism. Cambridge University Press.
    Michael Devitt is a distinguished philosopher of language. In this book he takes up one of the most important difficulties that must be faced by philosophical semantics: namely, the threat posed by holism. Three important questions lie at the core of this book: what are the main objectives of semantics; why are they worthwhile; how should we accomplish them? Devitt answers these 'methodological' questions naturalistically and explores what semantic programme arises from the answers. The approach is anti-Cartesian, rejecting the idea (...)
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  13. B. O. G. (1976). Why Does Language Matter to Philosophy? Review of Metaphysics 30 (2):343-345.
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  14. Martin Hinton (ed.) (2016). Evidence, Experiment and Argument in Linguistics and the Philosophy of Language. Peter Lang.
    This volume is concerned with issues in experimental philosophy and experimental linguistics. Examining experiments in language from a variety of perspectives, it asks what form they should take and what should count as evidence. There is particular focus on the status of linguistic intuitions and the use of language corpora. A number of papers address issues of methodology in experimental work, while other contributions examine the use of thought experiments and what the hypothetical can tell us about the actual. The (...)
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  15. Henry Hiż (1967). Review: Methodological Aspects of the Theory of Syntax. [REVIEW] Journal of Philosophy 64 (2):67 - 74.
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  16. Manuel Hernández Iglesias (2002). Are Natural Languages Necessary? (¿Son necesarios los lenguajes naturales?). Critica 34 (101):27 - 41.
    Against Davidson's criticism of the usual notion of a natural language, Dummett and most philosophers of language have argued that such a notion is necessary to account for the normativity of meaning and to avoid declaring meaningless much of our everyday talk on languages. This paper tries to show that both worries are unjustified by arguing that: 1) It is possible to talk of linguistic mistakes without commitment to natural languages in the usual sense; 2) The rejection of natural languages (...)
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  17. Nathan Isaacs (1959). What Do Linguistic Philosophers Assume? Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 60:211 - 230.
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  18. Pauline Jacobson (2002). The (Dis)Organization of the Grammar: 25 Years. [REVIEW] Linguistics and Philosophy 25 (5-6):601-626.
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  19. Pauline Jacobson (1999). Towards a Variable-Free Semantics. Linguistics and Philosophy 22 (2):117-185.
    The Montagovian hypothesis of direct model-theoretic interpretation of syntactic surface structures is supported by an account of the semantics of binding that makes no use of variables, syntactic indices, or assignment functions & shows that the interpretation of a large portion of so-called variable-binding phenomena can dispense with the level of logical form without incurring equivalent complexity elsewhere in the system. Variable-free semantics hypothesizes local interpretation of each surface constituent; binding is formalized as a type-shifting operation on expressions that denote (...)
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  20. Charles Johnson (1975). Some Psychological Implications of Language Flexibility. Behaviorism 3 (1):87-95.
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  21. Kent Johnson (2006). Externalist Thoughts and the Scope of Linguistics. Protosociology 22.
    A common assumption in metaphysics and the philosophy of language is that the general structure of language displays the general metaphysical structure of the things we talk about. But expressions can easily be imperfect representations of what they are about. After clarifying this general point, I make a case study of a recent attempt to semantically analyze the nature of knowledge-how. This attempt fails because there appears to be no plausible bridge from the linguistic structure of knowledge-how reports to knowledge-how (...)
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  22. Jesper Kallestrup (2016). Counteractuals, Counterfactuals and Semantic Intuitions. Review of Philosophy and Psychology 7 (1):35-54.
    Machery et al. claim that analytic philosophers of language are committed to a method of cases according to which theories of reference are assessed by consulting semantic intuitions about actual and possible cases. Since empirical evidence suggests that such intuitions vary both within and across cultures, these experimental semanticists conclude that the traditional attempt at pursuing such theories is misguided. Against the backdrop of Kripke’s anti-descriptivist arguments, this paper offers a novel response to the challenge posed by Machery et al., (...)
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  23. Justin Leiber (1999). Language Without Linguistics, or Badly Reinventing Oxford Ordinary Language Philosophy. Synthese 120 (2):193 - 211.
    Though Mr. Lin purports to attack "Chomsky's view of language" and to defend the "common sense view of language", he in fact attacks "views" that are basic and common to linguists, psycholinguists, and developmental psychologists. Indeed, though he cites W. V. O. Quine, L. Wittgenstein, and J. L. Austin in his support, they all sharply part company from his views, Austin particularly. Lin's views are not common sense but a set of scholarly and philological prejudices that linguistics disparaged from its (...)
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  24. Victor Loughlin (forthcoming). . Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences.
    Andy Clark once remarked that we make the world smart so we don�t have to be. What he meant was that human beings alter and transform their environments in order to accomplish certain tasks that would prove difficult without such transformations. This remarkable insight goes a long way towards explaining many aspects of human culture, ranging from linguistic notational systems to how we structure our cities. It also provides the basis for Mark Rowlands� thought-provoking and insightful book, The New Science (...)
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  25. Max M. Louwerse, Rick Dale, Ellen G. Bard & Patrick Jeuniaux (2012). Behavior Matching in Multimodal Communication is Synchronized. Cognitive Science 36 (8):1404-1426.
    A variety of theoretical frameworks predict the resemblance of behaviors between two people engaged in communication, in the form of coordination, mimicry, or alignment. However, little is known about the time course of the behavior matching, even though there is evidence that dyads synchronize oscillatory motions (e.g., postural sway). This study examined the temporal structure of nonoscillatory actions—language, facial, and gestural behaviors—produced during a route communication task. The focus was the temporal relationship between matching behaviors in the interlocutors (e.g., facial (...)
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  26. John Macmurray (1951). Some Reflections on the Analysis of Language. Philosophical Quarterly 1 (4):319-337.
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  27. O. Magidor (2012). The Philosophy of Generative Linguistics * by Peter Ludlow. Analysis 72 (4):844-846.
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  28. Michael McKinsey (1983). Psychologism in Semantics. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 13 (1):1 - 25.
    According to grice, Semantic concepts like meaning and reference should be explicated in terms of the propositional attitudes. In this paper, I argue that grice's program is mistaken in principle. I first motivate a gricean strategy for defining denotation, Or semantic reference, In terms of rules that govern what speakers may refer to with the terms they use. I then express three paradigm gricean theories of denotation and introduce considerations which show that these theories are false.
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  29. Maurice Michaux (1994). Hagège . The Language Builder. An Essay on the Human Signature in Linguistic Morphogenesis. [REVIEW] Revue Belge de Philologie Et D’Histoire 72 (3):646-648.
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  30. Jean-Claude Milner (1989). Introduction À Une Science du Langage.
    Dire que la linguistique est la science du langage est un truisme. Pourtant, tout ici est obscur et facteur de confusions, à commencer par la multiplicité des écoles de linguistique. Mais on peut et doit supposer que, par-delà les différences qui les séparent les unes des autres, il existe un programme général : construire une science du langage. Reste à exposer ce programme dans son détail et à mettre au jour les propositions qui le rendent légitime. -/- La première tâche (...)
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  31. Nenad Miščević (2006). Intuitions. Croatian Journal of Philosophy 6 (3):523-548.
    In Devitt’s view, linguistic intuitions are opinions about linguistic production of products, most often one’s own. They result frorn ordinary empirical investigation, so “they are immediate and fairly unreflectiveernpirical central-processor responses to linguistic phenomena”, which reactions are, moreover, theory-laden, where the ‘theory’ encompasses all sorts of speaker’s beliefs. The paper reconstructs his arguments, places his view on a map of alternative approaches to intuitions, and offers a defense of a minimalistic “voice-of-competence” view. First, intuitions are to be identified with the (...)
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  32. Toby Napoletano (2015). Compositionality as Weak Supervenience. Synthese 192 (1):201-220.
    This paper argues against Zoltán Szabó’s claim in “Compositionality as Supervenience” that we ought to understand the principle of compositionality as the idea that in natural language, the meanings of complex expressions strongly supervene on the meanings of their constituents and how the constituents are combined. The argument is that if we understand compositionality Szabó’s way, then compositionality can play no role in explanations of the acquirability of natural languages, because it makes these explanations circular. This, in turn, would undermine (...)
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  33. G. O'Brien & J. Opie, Language and Thought.
    This issue brings together papers by Australasian philosophers on language, thought, and their relationship. Contributors were given complete freedom to treat these topics in any way they saw fit. The results reflect the diverse interests of Australasian philosophers, and, perhaps even more strikingly, the diversity of philosophical methods they employ to persue these interests.
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  34. Barbara H. Partee (1977). Possible Worlds Semantics and Linguistic Theory. The Monist 60 (3):303-326.
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  35. Jacobson Pauline (2002). The (Dis) Organization of the Grammar: 25 Years. Linguistics and Philosophy 25.
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  36. Maribel Romero, The Penn Lambda Calculator: Pedagogical Software for Natural Language Semantics.
    This paper describes a novel pedagogical software program that can be seen as an online companion to one of the standard textbooks of formal natural language semantics, Heim and Kratzer (1998). The Penn Lambda Calculator is a multifunctional application designed for use in standard graduate and undergraduate introductions to formal semantics: Teachers can use the application to demonstrate complex semantic derivations in the classroom and modify them interactively, and students can use it to work on problem sets provided by the (...)
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Competence and Performance
  1. Edison Barrios (2012). Knowledge of Grammar and Concept Possession. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 63 (3):577-606.
    This article deals with the cognitive relationship between a speaker and her internal grammar. In particular, it takes issue with the view that such a relationship is one of belief or knowledge (I call this view the ‘Propositional Attitude View’, or PAV). I first argue that PAV entails that all ordinary speakers (tacitly) possess technical concepts belonging to syntactic theory, and second, that most ordinary speakers do not in fact possess such concepts. Thus, it is concluded that speakers do not (...)
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  2. Noam A. Chomsky (1980). Rules and Representations. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 3 (127):1-61.
    The book from which these sections are excerpted is concerned with the prospects for assimilating the study of human intelligence and its products to the natural sciences through the investigation of cognitive structures, understood as systems of rules and representations that can be regarded as These mental structui′es serve as the vehicles for the exercise of various capacities. They develop in the mind on the basis of an innate endowment that permits the growth of rich and highly articulated structures along (...)
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  3. John Collins, Robert J. Matthews, Barry C. Smith & Brian Epstein (2008). Philosophy of Linguistics. Croatian Journal of Philosophy 8 (22).
  4. Linguistic Competence (1985). N. Chomsky. In Jerrold J. Katz (ed.), The Philosophy of Linguistics. Oxford University Press 80.
  5. Michael Devitt (2003). Linguistics is Not Psychology. In Alex Barber (ed.), Epistemology of Language. Oxford University Press
  6. Reza Heidarizadi (2014). Phonological Change of Vowel Length in Farsi. SOCRATES 2 (JUNE 2014):50-55.
    Phonological change of vowel length in Farsi -/- Author / Authors : Reza Heidarizadi Page no. 50 - 55 Discipline : Persian Linguistics/language Script/language : Roman/English Category : Research paper Keywords: Farsi vowels, vowel length, Compensatory lengthening.
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  7. James Higginbotham (1991). Remarks on the Metaphysics of Linguistics. Linguistics and Philosophy 14 (5):555 - 566.
  8. L. J. (1973). Psycholinguistics: Chomsky and Psychology. [REVIEW] Review of Metaphysics 26 (4):753-754.
  9. R. Jackendoff (forthcoming). Patterns in the Mind: Language And. Human Nature.
  10. Lascelles G. B. James, Linguistic Relativity in the New Testament.
    This is a three part discussion on linguistic relativity and the New Testament which provides some perspectives towards understanding the inter-relatedness of society, culture, and language as they would have impacted the writers of the New Testament. The ideas discussed should provide useful information for further research into the application of modern linguistics to New Testament hermeneutics, systematic theology, and biblical exegesis. The implications of linguistic relativity theory applied to this genre of literature are of extreme importance in light of (...)
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  11. Jerrold J. Katz (ed.) (1985). The Philosophy of Linguistics. Oxford University Press.
    In light of the sharp linguistic turn philosophy has taken in this century, this collection provides a much-needed and long-overdue reference for philosophical discussion. The first collection of its kind, it explores questions of the nature and existence of linguistic objects--including sentences and meanings--and considers the concept of truth in linguistics. The status of linguistics and the nature of language now take a central place in discussions of the nature of philosophy; the essays in this volume both inform these discussions (...)
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  12. Robert N. Mccauley (1986). Problem Solving in Science and the Competence Approach to Theorizing in Linguistics. Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 16 (3):299–312.
    The goals ofthis paper are to identify (in Section II) some general features of problem solving strategies in science, to discuss (in Section III) how Chomsky has employed two particularly popular discovery strategies in science, and to show (in Section IV) how these strategies inform Chomskyan linguistics. In Section IV I will discuss (1) how their employment in linguistics manifests features of scientific problem solving outlined in Section Il and (2) how an analysis in terms of those features suggests a (...)
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  13. Niklas Möller (2014). All That Jazz: Linguistic Competence and Improvisation. Philosophical Studies 167 (2):237-250.
    Recently, theorists have pointed to the role of improvisation in practical reasoning and in gaining new moral knowledge. Laura and François Schroeter have gone even further by suggesting an account of competence with evaluative terms based on holistic improvisation. I argue, however, that they fail in their task. Through a challenge of their key claim against Allan Gibbard’s alternative account, I demonstrate that Schroeter and Schroeter provide only partial constraints on competence, and thus that their account lacks the content to (...)
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  14. Ian Harcourt Niles (1995). Wittgenstein and Generative Theories of Language and Linguistic Competence. Dissertation, University of California, Irvine
    A supposition which underlies and guides much theoretical work in linguistics and philosophy is that ordinary speakers "internally represent" recursive systems of linguistic rules. This supposition is not only pervasive; it is also extremely persuasive, for it is supported by a nest of very powerful arguments. Perhaps the most compelling of these is the argument from linguistic creativity, viz. that apparently the only explanation of how ordinary speakers with finite brains can understand an infinite number of sentences involves such systems (...)
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