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  1. Sean Aas (2015). Distributing Collective Obligation. Journal of Ethics and Social Philosophy 9 (3).
    In this paper I develop an account of member obligation: the obligations that fall on the members of an obligated collective in virtue of that collective obligation. I use this account to argue that unorganized collections of individuals can constitute obligated agents. I argue first that, to know when a collective obligation entails obligations on that collective’s members, we have to know not just what it would take for each member to do their part in satisfying the collective obligation, but (...)
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  2. Thomas M. Besch, Political Liberalism and Public Justification: The Deep View.
    The paper advances the deep view of public justification in political liberalism. It contrasts with ideal theory views, including Quong’s variant of an internal conception. I show how the deep view integrates key components of political liberalism’s justification structure, including pro tanto and full justification, political values, reasonableness, neutrality, reasonable comprehensive views, public reasons, the wide view of public political culture, overlapping consensus, political legitimacy, reflective equilibrium and the Original Position. I then contrast the deep view with Quong’s internal conception (...)
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  3. Thomas M. Besch (2012). Political Liberalism, the Internal Conception, and the Problem of Public Dogma. Philosophy and Public Issues 2 (1):153-177.
    According to the “internal” conception (Quong), political liberalism aims to be publicly justifiable only to people who are reasonable in a special sense specified and advocated by political liberalism itself. One advantage of the internal conception allegedly is that it enables liberalism to avoid perfectionism. The paper takes issue with this view. It argues that once the internal conception is duly pitched at its fundamental, metatheoretical level and placed in its proper discursive context, it emerges that it comes at the (...)
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  4. Thomas Biebricher & Frieder Vogelmann (forthcoming). Governmentality and State Theory: Reinventing the Reinvented Wheel? Theory and Event 15 (3).
    In this paper we pose the question what constitutes the originality of governmentality as a state analytical framework by confronting it with alternative contemporary approaches in state theory, suggesting that the latter may already contain many of the insights Foucaultians sometimes tend to ascribe to the governmentality perspective exclusively and thus run the risk of reinventing the state theoretical wheel. Still, we argue that there is something unique to the governmentality perspective, namely a particular kind of unwieldy knowledge about the (...)
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  5. Francesco Biondo (2012). Comparative Vs. Transcendental Approaches to Justice: A Misleading Dichotomy in Sen'sThe Idea of Justice. Ratio Juris 25 (4):555-577.
    This paper examines the distinction drawn by Amartya Sen between transcendental and comparative theories of justice, and its application to Rawls' doctrine. It then puts forward three arguments. First, it is argued that Sen offers a limited portrayal of Rawls' doctrine. This is the result of a rhetorical strategy that depicts Rawlsian doctrine as more “transcendental” than it really is. Although Sen deploys numerous quotations in support of his interpretation, it is possible to offer a less transcendental interpretation of Rawls. (...)
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  6. Michael Buckley (2012). Justice in Context: Assessing Contextualism as an Approach to Justice. Ethics and Global Politics 5 (2):71-94.
    Moral and political philosophers are increasingly using empirical data to inform their normative theories. This has sparked renewed interest into questions concerning the relationship between facts and principles. A recent attempt to frame these questions within a broader approach to normative theory comes from David Miller, who has on several occasions defended ‘contextualism’ as the best approach to justice. Miller argues that the context of distribution itself brings one or another political principle into play. This paper examines this claim. It (...)
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  7. Simon Caney (2016). Climate Change and Non-Ideal Theory: Six Ways of Responding to Noncompliance. In Clare Heyward & Dominic Roser (eds.), Climate Justice in a Non-Ideal World. Oxford University Press 21-42.
    This paper examines what agents should do when others fail to comply with their responsibilities to prevent dangerous climate change. It distinguishes between six different possible responses to noncompliance. These include what I term (1) 'target modification' (watering down the extent to which we seek to prevent climate change), (2) ‘responsibility reallocation’ (reassigning responsibilities to other duty bearers), (3) ‘burden shifting I’ (allowing duty bearers to implement policies which impose unjust burdens on others, (4) 'burden shifting II’ (allowing some to (...)
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  8. Naima Chahboun (2015). Nonideal Theory and Compliance—A Clarification. European Journal of Political Theory 14 (2):229-245.
    This paper examines the various ways in which nonideal theory responds to noncompliance with ideal principles of justice. Taking Rawls’ definition of nonideal theory as my point of departure, I propose an understanding of this concept as comprising two subparts: Complementary nonideal theory responds to deliberate and avoidable noncompliance and consists mainly of theories of civil disobedience, rebellion, and retribution. Substitutive nonideal theory responds to nondeliberate and unavoidable noncompliance and consists mainly of theories of transition and caretaking. I further argue (...)
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  9. Claudio Corradetti (2013). Philosophical Issues in Transitional Justice Theory: A (Provisional) Balance. Politica E Societa' (2):185-220.
  10. Speranta Dumitru (2014). From Birthright Citizenship to Open Borders? Some Doubts. Ethical Perspectives 21 (4):608-614.
    This paper argues that by overestimating the importance of citizenship rights, the ethics of immigration turns away from the more serious problem of closed borders. Precisely, this contribution is a threefold critique of Carens’ idea that "justice requires that democratic states grant citizenship at birth to the descendants of settled immigrants" (Carens, 2013: 20). Firstly, I argue that by making 'justice' dependent on states and their attributes (birthright citizenship), this idea strengthens methodological nationalism which views humanity as naturally divided into (...)
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  11. Hugo El Kholi (ed.) (2013). Global Justice and Practice-Dependence. Sciences Po Press.
    The practice-dependence approach offers a new way of theorizing about human rights and distributive justice that promises to settle some of the ongoing disputes about their justification, content, and scope. In sharp contrast with naturalistic theories, which conceive of human rights as an abstract moral ideal, practice-dependence theories regard human rights as a public political doctrine constructed to play a specific regulatory role in contemporary world politics. They maintain accordingly that the content of those rights should be determined in light (...)
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  12. Jakob Elster (2011). How Outlandish Can Imaginary Cases Be? Journal of Applied Philosophy 28 (3):241-258.
    It is common in moral philosophy to test the validity of moral principles by proposing counter-examples in the form of cases where the application of the principle does not give the conclusion we intuitively find valid. These cases are often imaginary and sometimes rather ‘outlandish’, involving ray guns, non-existent creatures, etc. I discuss whether we can test moral principles with the help of outlandish cases, or if only realistic cases are admissible. I consider two types of argument against outlandish cases: (...)
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  13. Saba Fatima (2014). Liberalism and the Muslim American Predicament. Social Theory and Practice 40 (4):591-608.
    The underlying objective of this project is to examine the ways in which the exclusionary status of Muslim-Americans remains unchallenged within John Rawls’ version of political liberalism. Toward this end, I argue that the stipulation of genuine belief in what is reasonably accessible to others in our society is an unreasonable expectation from minorities, given our awareness of how we are perceived by others. Second, using the work of Lisa Schwartzman, I show that Rawls’ reliance on abstraction of closed society (...)
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  14. Thomas Fossen (2012). Taking Stances, Contesting Commitments: Political Legitimacy and the Pragmatic Turn. Journal of Political Philosophy 21 (1):426-450.
  15. Gerald Gaus (2013). On Theorizing About Public Reason. European Journal of Analytic Philosophy 9 (1):64-85.
    This essay responds to the thoughtful essays on the Order of Public Reason (OPR) by Elvio Baccarini, Giulia Bistagnino and Nenad Miscevic. All three essays interrogate OPR’s understanding of moral theory - “meta” matters about the nature of morality, reasons and modeling within moral theories. I first turn to the general understanding of the moral enterprise underlying OPR, explaining why it takes a view at odds with the contemporary mainstream in moral philosophy. I then explain the idea of moral truth (...)
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  16. Sudhir Hazareesingh & Karma Nabulsi (2008). Using Archival Sources to Theorize About Politics. In David Leopold & Marc Stears (eds.), Political Theory: Methods and Approaches. Oxford University Press
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  17. Iwao Hirose (2008). Why Be Formal? In David Leopold & Marc Stears (eds.), Political Theory: Methods and Approaches. Oxford University Press
  18. Axel Honneth & Marco Solinas (2010). Capitalismo e riconoscimento (pdf: introduzione, prefazione, capitolo I). Firenze University Press.
    Capitalismo e riconoscimento" presenta, in cinque saggi per la prima volta raccolti insieme e tradotti in italiano, una densa e pregnante analisi di taluni cruciali processi socio-strutturali, morali e normativi delle società capitalistiche contemporanee dalla prospettiva delle dinamiche del reciproco riconoscimento e del disrispetto concernenti la sfera del lavoro. Particolare attenzione è dedicata ai paradossali rovesciamenti delle istanze di autorealizzazione, autonomia e responsabilità personale registratisi negli ultimi decenni nel quadro di un mercato del lavoro sempre più deregolato.
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  19. Aaron James (2013). Why Practices? Raisons Politiques 51:43-62.
    The practice-based method of justification requires sensitivity to social practices. This raises difficult questions: Must the practices in question be established or at least realistic? How “constructive” can we be in our interpretation of their form or aims? This paper suggests that our answers to these questions can vary with our explanatory purposes. Requirements of realism and sociological accuracy are relatively thin given purely intellectual aims of moral understanding, thicker given the aim of addressing humanity, and thicker still given the (...)
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  20. Robert Jubb (forthcoming). Playing Kant at the Court of King Arthur. Political Studies.
    This article contrasts the sense in which those whom Bernard Williams called ‘political realists’ and John Rawls are committed to the idea that political philosophy has to be distinctively political. Distinguishing the realist critique of political moralism from debates over ideal and non-ideal theory, it is argued that Rawls is more realist than many realists realise, and that realists can learn more about how to make a distinctively political vision of how our life together should be organised from his theorising, (...)
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  21. Robert Jubb (2014). Recover It From the Facts as We Know Them. Journal of Moral Philosophy 13 (1):77-99.
    In Andrea Sangiovanni’s words, practice-dependent theorists hold that “[t]he content, scope, and justification of a conception of [a given value] depends on the structure and form of the practices that the conception is intended to govern”. They have tended to present this as methodologically innovative, but here I point to the similarities between the methodological commitments of contemporary practice-dependent theorists and others, particularly P. F. Strawson in his Freedom and Resentment and Bernard Williams in general. I suggest that by looking (...)
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  22. Robert Jubb & Enzo Rossi (2015). Political Norms and Moral Values. Journal of Philosophical Research 40:455-458.
    This is a response to Erman and Moller's response to our reply to their 'Political Legitimacy in the Real Normative World', both also in this journal.
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  23. Robert Jubb & Enzo Rossi (2015). Why Moralists Should Be Afraid of Political Values. Journal of Philosophical Research 40:465-468.
    In this rejoinder to Erman and Möller’s reply to our “Political Norms and Moral Values” we clarify the sense in which there can be specifically political values, and expound the practice-dependent notion of legitimacy adopted by our preferred version of political realism.
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  24. David Haekwon Kim (2015). José Mariátegui's East-South Decolonial Experiment. Comparative and Continental Philosophy 7 (2):157-179.
    Common notions of comparative philosophy tend to be strongly configured by the East-West axis. This essay suggests ways of seeing Latin American liberation philosophy as a form of comparative philosophy and an important Latin American thinker as being relevant for East-West political philosophy. The essay focuses on the Peruvian activist and intellectual, José Mariátegui, who is widely regarded to have been a leading Marxist, liberatory, and decolonial figure in 20th century Latin America. Like many “Third World” intellectuals of the interwar (...)
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  25. Donald S. Klinefelter (1990). How is Applied Philosophy to Be Applied? Journal of Social Philosophy 21 (1):16-26.
  26. Carl Knight (2012). Unit-Ideas Unleashed: A Reinterpretation and Reassessment of Lovejovian Methodology in the History of Ideas. Journal of the Philosophy of History 6 (2):195-217.
    This article argues for an unconventional interpretation of Arthur O. Lovejoy’s distinctive approach to method in the history of ideas. It is maintained that the value of the central concept of the ‘unit-idea’ has been misunderstood by friends and foes alike. The commonality of unit-ideas at different times and places is often defined in terms of familial resemblance. But such an approach must necessarily define unit-ideas as being something other than the smallest conceptual unit. It is therefore in tension with (...)
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  27. Colin Koopman, The Aims of Political Philosophy in John Rawls, Bernard Williams, and Richard Rorty.
    What ought a political philosophy seek to achieve? How should political philosophy address itself to its subject matter? What is the relation between political philosophy and other forms of reflective inquiry? In answering these metaphilosophical questions, political philosophy has long been dominated by a roughly utopian self-image. According to this conception, the aim of political philosophy is the rigorous development of theoretical ideals of justice, state, and law. I show that leading political philosophers of the twentieth century, most notably John (...)
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  28. Günther Küchenhoff (1973). Geometrical Spirit and Natural Right. Inquiry Into the Methods of Political Philosophy in the Seventeenth and Eighteenth Centuries. Philosophy and History 6 (2):162-165.
  29. David Leopold (2008). Dialectical Approaches. In David Leopold & Marc Stears (eds.), Political Theory: Methods and Approaches. Oxford University Press
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  30. David Leopold & Marc Stears (2008). Introduction. In David Leopold & Marc Stears (eds.), Political Theory: Methods and Approaches. Oxford University Press
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  31. David Leopold & Marc Stears (eds.) (2008). Political Theory: Methods and Approaches. Oxford University Press.
    Both individually and as a collection, these essays will promote understanding and provoke further debate amongst students and established scholars alike.
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  32. Annabelle Lever (2014). Book Review: A Response to James Rule. Journal of Law, Culture, and Humanities 10 (1).
    James Rule is puzzled by the ‘idiosyncratic’ approach that I take to the philosophical study of privacy. As evidence for this idiosyncracy, he cites my relative indifference to the distinction between consequentialist and deontological perspectives on privacy although these differences are proof of ‘intricate, yet enormously consequential intellectual tensions’. My choice of philosophical topics is ‘unsystematic’ and more a reflection of my own ‘intellectual hobby-horses’ than a ‘well-worked-out view of what students most need to know’. Finally, Rule concludes, because ‘the (...)
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  33. Annabelle Lever (2011). On Privacy. Routledge.
    This book explores the Janus-faced features of privacy, and looks at their implications for the control of personal information, for sexual and reproductive freedom, and for democratic politics. It asks what, if anything, is wrong with asking women to get licenses in order to have children, given that pregnancy and childbirth can seriously damage your health. It considers whether employers should be able to monitor the friendships and financial affairs of employees, and whether we are entitled to know whenever someone (...)
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  34. Yoram Levy (2005). The Situational Context on the Nature of Political Philosophy. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 8 (5):535-556.
    Rationalism in political philosophy is the view that politics should be governed by moral principles and that those principles can and should be justified independently of the situations and circumstances that make up political reality. This traditional view of political philosophy implies that the meaning of right political action is determined by moral principles the rational authority of which derives from abstract philosophical reasoning, not from the situations and circumstances that are the substance of political reality. In this essay I (...)
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  35. Christian List & Laura Valentini (2016). The Methodology of Political Theory. In Herman Cappelen, Tamar Szabó Gendler & John Hawthorne (eds.), Oxford Handbook of Philosophical Methodology. Oxford University Press
    This article examines the methodology of a core branch of contemporary political theory or philosophy: “analytic” political theory. After distinguishing political theory from related fields, such as political science, moral philosophy, and legal theory, the article discusses the analysis of political concepts. It then turns to the notions of principles and theories, as distinct from concepts, and reviews the methods of assessing such principles and theories, for the purpose of justifying or criticizing them. Finally, it looks at a recent debate (...)
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  36. Steven Lukes (2003). Methodological Individualism. In Derek Matravers & Jonathan E. Pike (eds.), Debates in Contemporary Political Philosophy: An Anthology. Routledge, in Association with the Open University
  37. Lois McNay (2008). Recognition as Fact and Norm : The Method of Critique. In David Leopold & Marc Stears (eds.), Political Theory: Methods and Approaches. Oxford University Press
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  38. Saladin Meckled-Garcia (2013). The Practice-Dependence Red Herring and Better Reasons for Restricting the Scope of Justice. Raisons Politiques 51:97-120.
    In this paper, I make three points. The first is that there is indeed a distinctive approach to moral methodology, different from standard moral reasoning, that can be described as “practice-dependence”. I argue that its distinctness lies in recommending an aptness claim , namely that moral principles for regulating social practices must be principles for better fulfilling the point of those practices, a point discoverable in shared understandings of the practice. Participants treat domestic political societies as having a different point (...)
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  39. David Miller (2008). Political Philosophy for Earthlings. In David Leopold & Marc Stears (eds.), Political Theory: Methods and Approaches. Oxford University Press 29--48.
  40. Adam Morton (2001). Psychology for Cooperators. In Christopher W. Morris & Arthur Ripstein (eds.), Practical Rationality and Preference: Essays for David Gauthier. Cambridge University Press 153.
    I discuss what learned and innate routines of self and other attribution agents need to possess if they are to enter into cooperative arrangements as described game theoretically. I conclude that these are not so different from belief desire psychology as described by philosophers of mind.
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  41. Ryan Muldoon (2015). Expanding the Justificatory Framework of Mill's Experiments in Living. Utilitas 27 (2):179-194.
    In On Liberty, Mill introduced the concept of . I will provide an account of what Mill saw to be the basic problem he was addressing – the extensive pressure to fit in with the crowd, and how this bred mediocrity. I connect this to worries about public reason models of justification. I argue that a generalized version of Mill's argument offers us a better path to political justification stemming from experimentation. Rather than grounding political justification on shared political reasons, (...)
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  42. Alan Nelson (1986). Explanation and Justification in Political Philosophy. Ethics 97 (1):154-176.
  43. Kai Nielsen (1994). Methods of Ethics:Wide Reflective Equilibrium and a Kind of Consequentialism. Journal of Social Philosophy 25 (2):57-72.
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  44. Marcus Ohlström, Marco Solinas & Olivier Voirol (2011). On Nancy Fraser and Axel Honneth's Redistribution or Recognition? A Political-Philosophical Exchange. Iris 3 (5):205-221.
  45. Janosh Prinz & Enzo Rossi (forthcoming). Political Realism as Ideology Critique. Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy.
    This paper outlines an account of political realism as a form of ideology critique. Our focus is a defence of the normative edge of this critical-theoretic project against the common charge that there is a problematic trade-off between a theory’s groundedness in facts about the political status quo and its ability to consistently envisage radical departures from the status quo. To overcome that problem we combine insights from three distant corners of the philosophical landscape: theories of legitimacy by Bernard Williams (...)
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  46. Enzo Rossi (2016). Can Realism Move Beyond a Methodenstreit? [REVIEW] Political Theory 44 (3):410-420.
    Is there more to the recent surge in political realism than just a debate on how best to continue doing what political theorists are already doing? I use two recent books, by Michael Freeden and Matt Sleat, as a testing ground for realism’s claims about its import on the discipline. I argue that both book take realism beyond the Methodenstreit, though each in a different direction: Freeden’s takes us in the realm of meta-metatheory, Sleat’s is a genuine exercise in grounding (...)
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  47. Enzo Rossi (2016). Review of Raymond Geuss, Reality and Its Dreams. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Review.
    In this review I try and show the ways in which Geuss’ new work may advance the (radical) realist programme. The main contribution in the new essays, as I see it, is the emphasis on the counterintuitively transformative potential of a realist approach, as opposed to the false promise of highly moralised approaches. I also highlight some open questions about Geuss’ realism, primarily to do with his contextualism and with the role of feasibility constraints.
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  48. Jürgen Sirsch (2012). Die Relevanz idealer Theorie bei der Beurteilung praktischer Probleme. Zeitschrift Für Politische Theorie 3 (1).
    The paper discusses the adequate role of ideal theory for the discussion of practical problems. Therefore, I will reconstruct the Rawlsian understanding of the ideal-theoretical method and confront it with the critiques of Raymond Geuss and Amartya Sen. While Geuss is sceptical, whether ideal theory provides an appropriately critical perspective, Sen doubts the practical usefulness of ideal-theoretical models. It will be shown, that Rawlsian ideal theory can deal with these criticisms and that it is a useful tool for solving practical (...)
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  49. Marco Solinas (2010). Review of Bert van den Brink and David Owen (eds.), Recognition and Power. Axel Honneth and the Tradition of Critical Social Theory. [REVIEW] Iride: Filosofia e Discussione Pubblica (59):223-224.
  50. Marco Solinas (2009). Review of Hauke Brunkhorst, Habermas. [REVIEW] Iride: Filosofia e Discussione Pubblica (56):253-254.
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