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Summary Michel Foucault (1926–84) was a discipline-straddling French intellectual of the middle late twentieth century. Trained in philosophy and psychology, his early 'archaeological' work of the 1960s can be viewed as a form of history of ideas, while his later 'genelogical' work of the 1970s was markedly more political, although still focused on historical materials, and is often viewed as a form of sociology. His last work, in the 1980s, however, concerned with ancient thought, and notions of ethics and subjectivity, is more clearly philosophical, and indeed in this period Foucault explicitly his thought as philosophical, based on a definition of philosophy as being concerned today with the relationship of truth and politics.
Key works Foucault's first major work is Foucault 2006, his longest and most varied work, published first in 1961, a political-cum-intellectual history of the phenomenon of madness in European history. Thereafter, he moved in an increasingly theoretical direction, firstly in his monumental history of the development of the modern 'human sciences (Foucault 1970) and secondly in his most theoretical work, Foucault 1972, which is in effect a contribution to the philosophy of language. After the momentous political upheaval in France in 1968, Foucault's life and work underwent a pronounced political turn, leading to his history of imprisonment Foucault 1977, and the first volume of his history of sexuality, in which he expounds the beginnings of a new theory of social power 
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  1. Ross Abbinnett (1998). Truth and Social Science: From Hegel to Deconstruction. Sage Publications.
    The noble aim of sociologists to "tell the truth" has sometimes involved ignoble assumptions about human beings. In this major discussion of truth in the social science, Ross Abbinnett traces the debate on truth from the "objectifying powers" of Kant through more than 200 years of critique and reformulation to the unraveling of truth by Lyotard, Foucault, and Derrida. Truth and Social Science gives students an exciting and accessible guide to the main sociological treatments of truth and can also be (...)
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  2. Jerold J. Abrams (2004). Pragmatism, Artificial Intelligence, and Posthuman Bioethics: Shusterman, Rorty, Foucault. [REVIEW] Human Studies 27 (3):241-258.
    Michel Foucault's early works criticize the development of modern democratic institutions as creating a surveillance society, which functions to control bodies by making them feel watched and monitored full time. His later works attempt to recover private space by exploring subversive techniques of the body and language. Following Foucault, pragmatists like Richard Shusterman and Richard Rorty have also developed very rich approaches to this project, extending it deeper into the literary and somatic dimensions of self-stylizing. Yet, for a debate centered (...)
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  3. Jacques Adam & Dany Nobus (2002). The Meaning of the Return to the Lacanian Field: Lacan, Freud, Foucault. Analysis 11:91.
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  4. Janet Afary (2005). Foucault and the Iranian Revolution: Gender and the Seductions of Islamism. University of Chicago Press.
    In 1978, as the protests against the Shah of Iran reached their zenith, philosopher Michel Foucault was working as a special correspondent for Corriere della Sera and le Nouvel Observateur . During his little-known stint as a journalist, Foucault traveled to Iran, met with leaders like Ayatollah Khomeini, and wrote a series of articles on the revolution. Foucault and the Iranian Revolution is the first book-length analysis of these essays on Iran, the majority of which have never before appeared in (...)
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  5. Joseph Agassi (2005). Back to the Drawing Board. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 35 (4):509-518.
    Within ontology new theories are extremely rare. Hacking bravely claims to have one: "historical ontology" or "dynamic nominalism." Regrettably, he uses "nominalism" idiosyncratically, without explaining it or its qualifier. He does say what historical ontology is: it is "the presentation of the history of ontology in context." This idea is laudable, as it invites presenting idealism as once attractive but no longer so (due to changes in perception theory, for example). But this idea is a proposal, not a theory, muchless (...)
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  6. Odílio Alves Aguiar (2012). A recepçao biopolítica da obra de Hannah Arendt. Conjectura: Filosofia E Educação 17 (1):139-158.
    O presente artigo tem o objetivo de analisar a recepção da obra de Arendt a partir da categoria biopolítica. A categoria biopolítica instalou-se no centro do debate ético, político-filosófico contemporâneo, especialmente, após a requalificação de tal conceito dada por Foucault. Trata-se de mostrar que o termo biopolítica é anterior a Foucault, mas só com ele tal categoria adquiriu dimensão crítico-filosófica, considerando-o, no entanto, que é com Agamben que se dá a potencialização do debate acerca do tema biopolítica, exatamente, porque ele (...)
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  7. Andrew Aitken (2006). Thomas R. Flynn, Sartre, Foucault, and Historical Reason Volume Two: A Poststructuralist Mapping of History Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 26 (3):175-177.
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  8. Terry K. Aladjem (1995). Of Truth and Disagreement: Habermas, Foucault and Democratic Discourse. History of European Ideas 20 (4-6):909-914.
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  9. Terry K. Aladjem (1991). The Philosopher's Prism: Foucault, Feminism, and Critique. Political Theory 19 (2):277-291.
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  10. Linda Alcoff (1996). Dangerous Pleasures: Foucault and the Politics of Pedophilia. In Susan Hekman (ed.), Feminist Interpretations of Foucault. Pennsylvania State Press.
    This paper develops a critique of Foucault's treatment of child sexual abuse in relation to his theory of the relationship between discourse and experience.
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  11. Linda Alcoff (1993). Foucault as Epistemologist. Philosophical Forum 25 (2):95-124.
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  12. Linda Alcoff (1991). Michel Foucault's Archaeology of Scientific Reason, by Gary Gutting. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 51 (4):956-958.
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  13. Linda Martín Alcoff, Foucault's Philosophy of Science: Structures of Truth/Structures of Power.
    Michel Foucault’s formative years included the study not only of history and philosophy but also of psychology: two years after he took license in philosophy at the Sorbonne in 1948, he took another in psychology, and then obtained, in 1952, a Diplôme de Psycho Pathologie . From his earliest years at the Ecole Normale Superieur he had taken courses on general and social psychology with one of most influential psychologists of the time, Daniel Lagache, who was attempting to integrate psychoanalysis (...)
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  14. Frederick Luis Aldama (2008). Why the Humanities Matter: A Commonsense Approach. University of Texas Press.
    Introduction: a new humanism -- Self, identity, and ideas -- Revisiting Derrida, Lacan, and Foucault -- Derrida gets medieval -- Imaginary empires, real nations -- Edward said spaced out -- Modernity, what? -- Teachers, scholars, and the humanities today -- Translation matters -- Can music resist? -- The "cultural studies turn" in Brown studies -- Pulling up stakes in Latin/o American theoretical claims -- Fugitive thoughts on justice and happiness -- Why literature matters -- Interpretation, interdisciplinarity, and the people.
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  15. Anthony C. Alessandrini (2009). The Humanism Effect: Fanon, Foucault, and Ethics Without Subjects. Foucault Studies 7:64-80.
    This article addresses a tendency within postcolonial studies to place the work of Michel Foucault and Frantz Fanon in opposition. This has obscured the real, and potentially very productive, similarities between them. The most important of these links has to do with their shared critique of the sovereign subject of humanism: for Fanon and Foucault, this critique of the traditional humanist subject provides a way of opposing what they both see as the dangerous nostalgia for a lost moment of origin. (...)
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  16. Zulfiqar Ali, Ethics as Aesthetics : Michel Foucault's Genealogy of Ethics.
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  17. Zulfiqar Ali, Foucault�€™s Conception of Power: Questioning the Relevance of Marx.
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  18. Julie Allan (2005). Inclusion as an Ethical Project. In Shelley Tremain (ed.), Foucault and the Government of Disability. University of Michigan Press. 281--97.
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  19. Maxime Allard (2000). Philipp W. Rosemann, Understanding Scholastic Thought with Foucault Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 20 (6):432-433.
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  20. Amy Allen (2013). Feminism, Foucault, and the Critique of Reason: Re-Reading the History of Madness. Foucault Studies 16:15-31.
    This paper situates Lynne Huffer’s recent queer-feminist Foucaultian critique of reason within the context of earlier feminist debates about reason and critically assesses Huffer’s work from the point of view of its faithfulness to Foucault’s work and its implications for feminism. I argue that Huffer’s characterization of Enlightenment reason as despotic not only departs from Foucault’s account of the relationship between power and reason, it also leaves her stuck in the same double binds that plagued earlier feminist critiques of reason. (...)
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  21. Amy Allen (2011). Foucault and the Politics of Our Selves. History of the Human Sciences 24 (4):43-59.
    Exploring the apparent tension between Foucault’s analyses of technologies of domination – the ways in which the subject is constituted by power–knowledge relations – and of technologies of the self – the ways in which individuals constitute themselves through practices of freedom – this article endeavors to makes two points: first, the interpretive claim that Foucault’s own attempts to analyse both aspects of the politics of our selves are neither contradictory nor incoherent; and, second, the constructive claim that Foucault’s analysis (...)
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  22. Amy Allen (2010). The Entanglement of Power and Validity : Foucault and Critical Theory. In Timothy O'Leary & Christopher Falzon (eds.), Foucault and Philosophy. Wiley-Blackwell. 78--98.
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  23. Amy Allen (2009). Discourse, Power, and Subjectivation: The Foucault/Habermas Debate Reconsidered. Philosophical Forum 40 (1):1-28.
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  24. Amy Allen (2007). The Politics of Our Selves: Power, Autonomy, and Gender in Contemporary Critical Theory. Columbia University Press.
    Introduction : the politics of our selves -- Foucault, subjectivity, and the enlightenment : a critical reappraisal -- The impurity of practical reason : power and autonomy in Foucault -- Dependency, subordination, and recognition : Butler on subjection -- Empowering the lifeworld? autonomy and power in Habermas -- Contextualizing critical theory -- Engendering critical theory.
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  25. Amy Allen (2006). Review of Thomas Flynn, Sartre, Foucault and Historical Reason, Volume 2: A Poststructuralist Mapping of History. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2006 (2).
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  26. Amy Allen (2003). Foucault and Enlightenment: A Critical Reappraisal. Constellations 10 (2):180-198.
    In a late discussion of Kant’s essay, “Was ist Aufklärung?,” Foucault credits Kant with posing “the question of his own present” and positions himself as an inheritor of this Kantian legacy.1 Foucault has high praise for the critical tradition that emerges from Kant’s historical-political reflections on the Enlightenment and the French Revolution; Kant’s concern in these writings with “an ontology of the present, an ontology of ourselves” is, he says, characteristic of “a form of philosophy, from Hegel, through Nietzsche and (...)
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  27. Amy Allen (2002). Power, Subjectivity, and Agency: Between Arendt and Foucault. International Journal of Philosophical Studies 10 (2):131 – 149.
    The author argues for bringing the work of Michel Foucault and Hannah Arendt into dialogue with respect to the links between power, subjectivity, and agency.Although one might assume that Foucault and Arendt come from such radically different philosophical starting points that such a dialogue would be impossible, the author argues that there is actually a good deal of common ground to be found between these two thinkers. Moreover, the author suggests that Foucault's and Arendt's divergent views about the role that (...)
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  28. Amy Allen (2000). The Anti-Subjective Hypothesis: Michel Foucault and the Death of the Subject. Philosophical Forum 31 (2):113–130.
    The centerpiece of the first volume of Michel Foucault’s History of Sexuality is the analysis of what Foucault terms the “repressive hypothesis,” the nearly universal assumption on the part of twentieth-century Westerners that we are the heirs to a Victorian legacy of sexual repression. The supreme irony of this belief, according to Foucault, is that the whole time that we have been announcing and denouncing our repressed, Victorian sexuality, discourses about sexuality have actually proliferated. Paradoxically, as Victorian as we allegedly (...)
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  29. Amy Allen (1998). Foucault's Debt to Hegel. Philosophy Today 42 (1):71-78.
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  30. Barry Allen (2010). Foucault's Theory of Knowledge. In Timothy O'Leary & Christopher Falzon (eds.), Foucault and Philosophy. Wiley-Blackwell. 143--162.
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  31. Barry Allen (2005). Foucault's Nominalism. In Shelley Tremain (ed.), Foucault and the Government of Disability. University of Michigan Press. 93--107.
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  32. Barry Allen (1999). Feminist Interpretations of Michel Foucault Susan J. Hekman, Editor University Park, PA: Pennsylvania State University Press, 1996, Ix + 320 Pp. [REVIEW] Dialogue 38 (01):221-.
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  33. Barry Allen (1991). Government in Foucault. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 21 (4):421 - 439.
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  34. Felipe Quintão de Almeida & Alexandre Fernandez Vaz (2011). (Re)descrevendo Foucault: Com Rorty, contra Rorty. Trans/Form/Ação 34 (2):193-214.
    O artigo propõe uma interlocução entre o filósofo francês Michel Foucault e o filósofo norte-americano Richard Rorty. Apresenta a descrição que Rorty realizou do colega francês. Analisa essa leitura e oferece, a partir do próprio Foucault, uma interpretação alternativa, que aponta para algumas imprecisões cometidas por Rorty, em sua interpretação. Conclui com um comentário sobre a conversação proposta.
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  35. Ian Almond (2004). The Madness of Islam': Foucault's Occident and the Revolution in Iran. Radical Philosophy 128:12-22.
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  36. Alexandre Alves (2011). A crítica de ponta-cabeça: sobre a significação de Kant no pensamento de Foucault. Trans/Form/Ação 30 (1):25-40.
    Este artigo pretende avaliar a relação que Foucault estabelece com a modernidade, tendo como fio condutor seu vínculo com o pensamento de Kant. Aborda-se, num primeiro momento, a leitura que Foucault faz de Kant na época em que estava escrevendo As Palavras e as Coisas, observando uma tensão entre o projeto crítico e o antropologismo kantiano e, num segundo momento, interroga-se sua relação com Kant a partir de alguns de seus últimos textos, nos quais Foucault procura uma “ontologia do presente”.
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  37. Davis Moreira Alvim (2012). Foucault E o primado Das resistências. Cadernos de Ética E Filosofia Política 20:22-30.
    Is it possible to find resistance in the thought of Michel Foucault? Amid the diversity of his ideas, would he have left us clues to think the resisting act? By directing his intellectual production to power dispositfs, by invoking the figure of the "specific intellectual", and, also, in the later years of his life, then turning towards the constitution of subjectivities, Foucault provides us with unique ways to conceive and operate resistances. In this article we explore two directions of the (...)
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  38. Pierandrea Amato (2011). Ontologia E Storia: La Filosofia di Michel Foucault. Carocci.
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  39. John Ambrosio (2010). A Fearsome Trap: The Will to Know, the Obligation to Confess, and the Freudian Subject of Desire. Educational Philosophy and Theory 42 (7):728-741.
    The author examines the relation between Michel Foucault's corpus and Freudian psychoanalysis. He argues that Foucault had a complex and changing relationship to psychoanalysis for two primary reasons: his own psychopathology, personal experience, and expressed desire, and due to an ineluctable contradiction at the heart of psychoanalysis itself. The author examines the history of Foucault's personal and scholarly interest in psychology and psychiatry, tracing the emergence, development, and shift in his thought and work. He then argues that Foucault's critique of (...)
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  40. Razvan Amironesei (2011). La déprise de soi chez Michel Foucault comme pratique d'écriture et enjeu de l'identité subjective. Symposium: The Canadian Journal of Continental Philosophy 15 (1):146-169.
    Chez les commentateurs de l’oeuvre de Michel Foucault, le concept de sujet est communément analysé en termes de processus historiques de subjectivation. Contrairement à ce type d’analyse, l’enjeu de ce travail est de montrer l’émergence d’une problématique de la désubjectivation à partir de la notion foucaldienne de déprise de soi. Il s’agit de montrer d’abord que cette notion aménage à la fois la dispersion et l’effacement de l’auteur. Deuxièmement, la conceptualisation de la déprise sera traitée à travers l’analyse de pratiques (...)
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  41. Carolyn Anne Anderson (2005). Real and Ideal Spaces of Disability in American Stadiums and Arenas. In Shelley Tremain (ed.), Foucault and the Government of Disability. University of Michigan Press.
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  42. Russell Anderson & James Wong (2013). Truth and the 'Politics of Ourselves'. Southern Journal of Philosophy 51 (4):419-444.
    The authors take up Amy Allen's suggestion that while Foucault's work may be able to support a certain type of self-critique and self-development, it does not permit the kind of interpersonal relations that are necessary for the development of intersubjective meaning in struggles against imposed identities. The authors contend that for Foucault, relations of ‘truth’ play an important constitutive role in subjectivities, and that understanding the ‘politics of ourselves’ in the context of this truth shows not only an openness to (...)
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  43. Thomas C. Anderson (1998). Sartre, Foucault, and Historical Reason. Volume One. Review of Metaphysics 51 (3):678-680.
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  44. Pierre Anouilh & Emmanuel Puig (2005). Les relations internationales à l'épreuve du poststructuralisme: Foucault et le troisième “grand débat” épistémologique. In Sylvain Meyet, Marie-Cécile Naves & Thomas Ribemont (eds.), Travailler Avec Foucault: Retours Sur le Politique. Harmattan. 141--159.
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  45. Yann Appere (2005). De Platon à Foucault: La Philosophie au Cœur du Pouvoir. Frambar Editions.
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  46. Joyce Oldham Appleby (ed.) (1996). Knowledge and Postmodernism in Historical Perspective. Routledge.
    Knowledge and Postmodernism in Historical Perspective offers answers to the questions, what is postmodernism? and what exactly are the characteristics of the modernism that postmodernism supercedes? This comprehensive reader chronicles the western engagement with the nature of knowledge during the past four centuries while providing the historical context for the postmodernist thought of Jacques Derrida, Michel Foucault, Richard Rorty and Hayden White, and the challenges their ideas have posed to our conventional ways of thinking, writing and knowing. From the science (...)
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  47. Hannah Arendt, Herbert Marcuse, Michel Foucault, Mark Ourent, Gregory Pence, Robert Nozick, David Schweickart, Allen Wood, Gary Dymski, John Rawls, Richard Arneson, G. A. Cohen, Ann Ferguson, Gregory Kavka, Mary Hawkesworth, Jon Elster, Phillipe van Parijs, Andrew Levine & John Roemer (2001). Philosophy and the Problems of Work: A Reader. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
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  48. Mohammadreza Arghiani (2012). Diminishing I's: The Unnamable's Absent Subjecthood and the Disintegration of Meaning in the Face of Foucault's Panopticon. Philosophy and Literature 36 (2):465-475.
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  49. Ellen Armour (2010). Blinding Me with (Queer) Science: Religion, Sexuality, and (Post?) Modernity. [REVIEW] International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 68 (1):107-119.
    This essay brings to bear insights from continental philosophers Michel Foucault and Judith Butler on the science of (homo)sexuality and, more importantly, the desire to use such science to resolve contemporary conflicts over homosexuality’s acceptability. So-called queer science remains deeply beholden to modern notions of sex, gender, and sexuality, the author argues, a schematic that its premodern (Christian) roots further denaturalize. The philosophical insights drawn from this analysis are then applied to the controversy over homosexuality within global Christianity that often (...)
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  50. Aurelia Armstrong, Foucault and Feminism. Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
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