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  1. Reʼ Agushevits & Uven (2010). Ancient Greek Philosophy From Thales to the Pythagoreans. Ktav.
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  2. Reuven Agushewitz (2010). Ancient Greek Philosophy From Thales to the Pythagoreans. Ktav.
  3. D. J. Allan (1951). Philosophical Surveys I: A Survey of Work Dealing with Greek Philosophy From Thales to the Age of Cicero, 1945-1949, Part II. [REVIEW] Philosophical Quarterly 1 (2):165-170.
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  4. D. J. Allan (1950). Philosophical Surveys, I: A Survey of Work Dealing with Greek Philosophy From Thales to the Age of Cicero, 1945-49. Philosophical Quarterly 1 (1):61-72.
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  5. Reginald E. Allen (1966). Greek Philosophy, Thales to Aristotle. New York, Free Press.
  6. Anaximander & Arthur Fairbanks (1898). Anaximander Fragments and Commentary (The First Philosophers of Greece). K. Paul, Trench, Trubner.
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  7. Anaximenes & Arthur Fairbanks (1898). Anaximenes Fragments and Commentary (From The First Philosophers of Greece). K. Paul, Trench, Trubner.
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  8. Adriano Ardovino (2012). Interpretazioni Fenomenologiche di Eraclito. Quodlibet.
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  9. Elizabeth Asmis (1981). What is Anaximander's Apeiron ? Journal of the History of Philosophy 19 (3):279-297.
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  10. Harold W. Attridge (1976). First-Century Cynicism in the Epistles of Heraclitus. Published by Scholars Press for the Harvard Theological Review.
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  11. Jonathan Barnes (1980). Heraclitus From the Deep End D. Holwerda: Sprünge in Die Tie Fen Heraklits. Pp. X + 138. Groningen: Bouma's Boekhuis, 1978. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 30 (01):45-46.
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  12. Peter J. Bart (1932). God in Greek Philosophy to the Time of Thales. New Scholasticism 6 (2):161-165.
  13. M. G. J. Beets (1986). The Coherence of Reality: Experiments in Philosophical Interpretation: Heraclitus, Parmenides, Plato. Eburon.
  14. Andrew Benjamin (2005). Spacing as the Shared: Heraclitus, Pindar, Agamben. In Andrew Norris (ed.), Politics, Metaphysics, and Death: Essays on Giorgio Agamben's Homo Sacer. Duke University Press.
  15. Jean Bernhardt (1982). The Art and Thought of Heraclitus. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Philosophy 20 (4):425-427.
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  16. Gábor Betegh (2007). On the Physical Aspect of Heraclitus' Psychology. Phronesis 52 (1):3-32.
    The paper first discusses the metaphysical framework that allows the soul's integration into the physical world. A close examination of B36, supported by the comparative evidence of some other early theories of the soul, suggests that the word psuchê could function as both a mass term and a count noun for Heraclitus. There is a stuff in the world, alongside other physical elements, that manifests mental functions. Humans, and possibly other beings, show mental functions in so far as they have (...)
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  17. István M. Bodnaár (1992). Anaximander on the Stability of the Earth. Phronesis 37 (3):336 - 342.
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  18. István M. Bodnár (1988). Anaximander's Rings. Classical Quarterly 38 (01):49-.
    Anaximander is the first philosopher whose theory of the heavens is preserved in broad outlines. According to the sources the celestial bodies are huge rings of compressed air around the earth, each visible only where it is perforated by a tubular vent through which the fire contained in it can shine. Greatest and farthest of them is the sun, next comes the moon and under them there is the ring of the stars. It is a common practice to put and (...)
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  19. C. M. Bowra (1941). Xenophanes, Fragment 3. Classical Quarterly 35 (3-4):119-.
    Athenaeus, xii. 526 a, quotes three elegiac couplets of Xenophanes on the luxurious ways which the men of Colophon learned from the Lydians. Since the lines lack theological or metaphysical interest, they have not received so much attention as other fragments of Xenophanes, and few attempts have been made to unravel their exact meaning. But it is rash to hurry over anything written by Xenophanes, and these lines are in their way as interesting as anything else that he wrote. For (...)
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  20. Eva T. H. Brann (2011). The Logos of Heraclitus: The First Philosopher of the West on its Most Interesting Term. Paul Dry Books.
    Eva Brann delves into Heraclitus's famously cryptic saying, "all things come to be in accordance with this Logos.".
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  21. Wolfgang Brokmeier (1994). Der Andere Anfang im Ersten oder das Finden des Eigenen im Fremden der Frühe: Heidegger und Anaximander. Heidegger Studies 10:111-126.
  22. George Bosworth Burch (1949). Anaximander, the First Metaphysician. Review of Metaphysics 3 (2):137 - 160.
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  23. John Burnet (1968). Greek Philosophy: Thales to Plato. New York, St. Martin's P..
    PREFACE: THE preparation of this volume was undertaken some years ago, but was interrupted by my work on the Lexicon Platonicum which has proved a more ...
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  24. Helen Morris Cartwright (1965). Heraclitus and the Bath Water. Philosophical Review 74 (4):466-485.
  25. Alessandro Chiappelli (1888). XXXIII. Zu Pythagoras Und Anaximenes. Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 1 (4):582-594.
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  26. Theodor Christidis & Demetrius Athanassakis (2007). A Critique of F. M. Cornford's View About the Cosmological Scheme of Anaximander. Philosophical Inquiry 29 (3-4):5-8.
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  27. Gordon Haddon Clark (1957). Thales to Dewey. Boston, Houghton Mifflin.
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  28. Michael Clarke (1995). The Wisdom of Thales and the Problem of the Word IEPOΣ. Classical Quarterly 45 (02):296-.
    Those who write about early Greek literature often assume that each item in the ancient vocabulary answers to a single concept in the world-view of its users. It seems reasonable to hope that the body of ideas represented by a particular Greek word will frame one's discussion better than any question that could be asked in English: so that a cautious scholar might prefer to discuss the phenomenon called αδς, for example, than to plunge into a study of Greek ideas (...)
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  29. C. Joachim Classen (1982). Heraclitus, Parmenides and the Beginning of Philosophy and Science. A Phenomenological Study. Philosophy and History 15 (2):109-110.
  30. C. Joachim Classen (1977). Anaximander and Anaximenes: The Earliest Greek Theories of Change? Phronesis 22 (2):89 - 102.
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  31. Felix M. Cleve (1964). The 'Apeiron' of Anaximander. New Scholasticism 38 (2):262-264.
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  32. Felix M. Cleve (1962). Anaximander and the Origins of Greek Cosmology. [REVIEW] New Scholasticism 36 (1):109-111.
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  33. Edward Clodd (1897/1972). Pioneers of Evolution From Thales to Huxley. Freeport, N.Y.,Books for Libraries Press.
  34. Frederick C. Copleston (1951). Greek Philosophy, Volume I, Thales to Plato. By C. J. De Vogel Ph.D., (Leiden: E. J. Brill. 1950. Pp. X + 318.). Philosophy 26 (97):187-.
  35. Jean-François Corre (2013). Proportions du ciel d'Anaximandre. Phronesis 58 (1):1-16.
    The doxography for Anaximander’s account of the rings of the sky gives proportions for them that are discrepant. So a widely accepted hypothesis proposes that, since the circles of the celestial bodies are compared to wheels, we should add the thickness of their ‘rims’ to the measurements for the celestial rings. This paper proposes an entirely different hypothesis which avoids this awkward expedient by suggesting that there is a ‘geometrical’ reading of the numerical data. The discrepancies can then be explained (...)
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  36. Dirk L. Couprie, Anaximander. Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
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  37. Patricia Kenig Curd (1991). Knowledge and Unity in Heraclitus. The Monist 74 (4):531-549.
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  38. R. M. Dancy (1989). Thales, Anaximander, and Infinity. Apeiron 22 (3):149 - 190.
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  39. Karin De Boer (1997). Giving Due: Heidegger's Interpretation of the Anaximander Fragment. Research in Phenomenology 27 (1):150-166.
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  40. Theodore de Laguna (1922). The Interpretation of Heraclitus. Philosophical Review 31 (6):598-601.
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  41. Theodore de Laguna (1921). The Importance of Heraclitus. Philosophical Review 30 (3):238-254.
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  42. D. R. Dicks (1959). Thales. Classical Quarterly 9 (3-4):294-.
    The Greeks attributed to Thales a great many discoveries and achievements. Few, if any, of these can be said to rest on thoroughly reliable testimony, most of them being the ascriptions of commentators and compilers who lived anything from 700 to 1,000 years after his death—a period of time equivalent to that between William the Conqueror and the present day. Inevitably there ilso accumulated round the name of Thales, as round that of Pythagoras , a number of anecdotes of varying (...)
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  43. D. R. Dicks (1956). Strabo and the Kimata. Classical Quarterly 6 (3-4):243-.
    In a recent paper I discussed the origin of the concept of the climata in Greek geography, and adduced reasons for attributing the formulation and elaboration of the concept to Hipparchus . The above passage in Strabo was naturally mentioned in the course of the argument, and I drew attention in a footnote to the unsatisfactory nature of the account given by him of the climata. I now propose to examine the passage in more detail.
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  44. H. Diels (1897). XI. Ueber Anaximanders Kosmos. Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 10 (1-4):228-237.
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  45. Roman Dilcher (1995). Studies in Heraclitus. Olms.
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  46. Roman Dilcher (1994). On the Wording of Heraclitus, Fragment 126. Classical Quarterly 44 (01):276-.
    Heraclitus B 126 D.-K. occurs in a scholion on Tzetzes' commentary on the Iliad. According to the first edition by G. Hermann on which all editors of Heraclitus have based their text, it reads as follows: τ ψυχρ θρεται, θερμν ψχεται, γρν αανεται, καραλον νοτζεται.
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  47. Klaus Döring (1980). First-Century Cynicism in the Epistles of Heraclitus. Journal of the History of Philosophy 18 (3):339-342.
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  48. A. E. Douglas (1966). Manfred Fuhrmann: Untersuchungen zur Textgeschichte der pseudo-aristotelischen Alexander-Rhetorik (der Τ χνη des Anaximenes von Lampsakos). (Akad. d. Wiss. in Mainz, Abh. d. Geistes- u. Sozialwiss. Kl. 1964. 7.) Pp. 209; 3 plates. Wiesbaden: Steiner, 1905. Paper, DM. 20.80. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 16 (3):406-407.
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  49. James Wayne Dye (1974). Heraclitus and the Future of Process Philosophy. Tulane Studies in Philosophy 23:13-31.
  50. Alfred Einstein (1937). Democritus and Heraclitus: A Duet in Major and Minor. Journal of the Warburg Institute 1 (2):177-179.
1 — 50 / 212