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  1. Norman Abeles (2011). Ethics and the Interrogation of Prisoners: An Update. Ethics and Behavior 20 (3):243-249.
    The issue of interrogation of detainees has received much attention in the psychological literature and by the media. Some estimate that more than 300 articles have been published in psychological journals on this topic. This article reiterates the content of the Presidential Task Force on Psychological Ethics and National Security and provides a brief history and background. This is followed by a section on the torture of prisoners and the role of psychologists. It includes discussion of resolutions passed by American (...)
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  2. Richard Adams (2013). Moral Autonomy in Australian Legislation and Military Doctrine. Ethics and Global Politics 6 (3).
    "Australian legislation and military doctrine stipulate that soldiers ‘subjugate their will’ to" "government, and fight in any war the government declares. Neither legislation nor doctrine enables the conscience of soldiers. Together, provisions of legislation and doctrine seem to take soldiers for granted. And, rather than strengthening the military instrument, the convention of legislation and doctrine seems to weaken the democratic foundations upon which the military may be shaped as a force for justice. Denied liberty of their conscience, soldiers are denied (...)
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  3. Yuejin Ai (2005). Jun Shi Si Xiang Zong Heng Tan. Nan Kai da Xue Chu Ban She.
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  4. Andrew Alexandra (2012). Private Military and Security Companies and the Liberal Conception of Violence. Criminal Justice Ethics 31 (3):158-174.
    Abstract The institution of war is the broad framework of rules, norms, and organizations dedicated to the prevention, prosecution, and resolution of violent conflict between political entities. Important parts of that institution consist of the accountability arrangements that hold between armed forces, the political leaders who oversee and direct the use of those forces, and the people in whose name the leaders act and from whose ranks the members of the armed forces are drawn. Like other parts of the institution, (...)
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  5. Andrew Alexandra, Deane-Peter Baker & Marina Caparini (eds.) (2008). Private Military and Security Companies: Ethics, Policies and Civil-Military Relations. Routledge.
  6. Fritz Allhoff (2010). Physicians at War. International Journal of Applied Philosophy 24 (1):101-114.
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  7. Fritz Allhoff (2009). The War on Terror and the Ethics of Exceptionalism. Journal of Military Ethics 8 (4):265-288.
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  8. Fritz Allhoff (2008). Physicians at War: The Dual-Loyalties Challenge. Journal of Military Ethics 7 (4):320-322.
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  9. Miguel Alzola (2011). The Ethics of Business in Wartime. Journal of Business Ethics 99 (S1):61-71.
    The orthodox account of the morality of war holds that the responsibility for resorting to war rests on the state’s political authorities and the responsibility for how the war is waged rests only on the state’s army and, thus, business firms have no special obligations in wartime. The purpose of this article is to reconsider the ethical responsibilities of business firms in wartime. I defend the claim that a plausible standard of liability in war must integrate the degree of the (...)
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  10. George Andreopoulos & Shawna Brandle (2012). Revisiting the Role of Private Military and Security Companies. Criminal Justice Ethics 31 (3):138-157.
    Abstract This essay addresses the role of private military and security companies (PMSCs) in security governance. In this context, it offers a historical overview of some of the main developments in the evolution of private warfare and critically discusses some of the key challenges confronting the quest for holding PMSCs accountable in accordance with international human rights and humanitarian norms.
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  11. Topolski Anya (2013). Relationality: An Ethical Response to the Tensions of Network Enabled Operations in the Kunduz Airstrikes. Journal of Military Ethics 2.
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  12. Ruben Apressyan (2002). Obedience and Responsibility in Different Types of Military Ethics. Professional Ethics 10 (2/3/4):231-244.
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  13. Ronald C. Arkin (2010). The Case for Ethical Autonomy in Unmanned Systems. Journal of Military Ethics 9 (4):332-341.
    The underlying thesis of the research in ethical autonomy for lethal autonomous unmanned systems is that they will potentially be capable of performing more ethically on the battlefield than are human soldiers. In this article this hypothesis is supported by ongoing and foreseen technological advances and perhaps equally important by an assessment of the fundamental ability of human warfighters in today's battlespace. If this goal of better-than-human performance is achieved, even if still imperfect, it can result in a reduction in (...)
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  14. Raymond Aron (1986). Clausewitz, Philosopher of War. Simon & Schuster.
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  15. Hilliard Aronovitch (2001). Good Soldiers, a Traditional Approach. Journal of Applied Philosophy 18 (1):13–23.
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  16. John Arquilla (2013). Twenty Years of Cyberwar. Journal of Military Ethics 12 (1):80-87.
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  17. Sidney Axinn (2009). A Moral Military. Temple University Press.
    In this new edition of the classic book on the moral conduct of war, Sidney Axinn provides a full-length treatment of the military conventions from a ...
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  18. Cristina Badescu (2008). Humanitarian Intervention: Ideas in Action. Journal of Military Ethics 7 (1):76-78.
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  19. Pavel Baev (2006). Thucydides' Three Security Dilemmas in Post-Soviet Strife. Journal of Military Ethics 5 (4):334-352.
    Attempting to apply the logic of conflict analysis developed by Thucydides to the chaotic spasms and clashes triggered by the collapse of the Soviet Union might appear inappropriate to many classical scholars, and entirely artificial to most Eurasian security experts. However, the two strategic landscapes, though separated by a period of some 2400 years, share a number of common features, and the ideas of the ancient strategic analyst may prove helpful for discovering structure in the chaotic violence of more recent (...)
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  20. Cecilia Bailliet (2007). 'War in the Home': An Exposition of Protection Issues Pertaining to the Use of House Raids in Counterinsurgency Operations. Journal of Military Ethics 6 (3):173-197.
    House raids represent the genre of military acts which fall within the grey zone of war and peace ? counterinsurgency, post-conflict operations, or phase IV operations (a.k.a. Operations Other Than War) ? in which the Geneva Conventions and their Protocols may reveal protection gaps. This article reviews accounts of the execution of house raids contained in the military literature and compares them to the testimony of soldiers and observers recorded in the media. It assesses the relevant provisions of humanitarian law (...)
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  21. Deane-Peter Baker (2012). Making Good Better: A Proposal for Teaching Ethics at the Service Academies. Journal of Military Ethics 11 (3):208-222.
    Abstract This paper addresses the teaching of mandatory ethics courses in a military context, with particular reference to the Service Academies of the United States Armed Forces. In seeking to optimize the core ethics course's potential to develop Midshipmen and Cadets' moral reasoning skills I suggest a model that employs case-based scenarios, woven together into a metanarrative, in place of the traditional historical case study and in a manner that gives students deliberate, guided practice in ethical decision-making. The described model (...)
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  22. Deane-peter Baker (2006). Defending the Common Life: National-Defence After Rodin. Journal of Applied Philosophy 23 (3):259–275.
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  23. Deane-Peter Baker & James Pattison (2011). The Principled Case for Employing Private Military and Security Companies in Interventions for Human Rights Purposes. Journal of Applied Philosophy 29 (1):1-18.
    The possibility of using private military and security companies to bolster the capacity to undertake intervention for human rights purposes (humanitarian intervention and peacekeeping) has been increasingly debated. The focus of such discussions has, however, largely been on practical issues and the contingent problems posed by private force. By contrast, this article considers the principled case for privatising humanitarian intervention. It focuses on two central issues. First, does outsourcing humanitarian intervention to private military and security companies pose some fundamental, deeper (...)
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  24. David M. Barnes (2013). Should Private Security Companies Be Employed for Counterinsurgency Operations? Journal of Military Ethics 12 (3):201-224.
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  25. Edward Barrett (2010). Executive Summary and Command Brief. Journal of Military Ethics 9 (4):424-431.
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  26. Edward T. Barrett (2013). Warfare in a New Domain: The Ethics of Military Cyber-Operations. Journal of Military Ethics 12 (1):4-17.
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  27. LtCol Edward Barrett (2010). Executive Summary and Command Brief. Journal of Military Ethics 9 (4):424-431.
    We conclude this special issue with the Executive Summary and Command Brief from the McCain Conference, ?New Warriors/New Weapons: The Ethical Ramifications of Emerging Military Technologies?, as formulated by the conference convener, the Stockdale Center for Ethical Leadership at the US Naval Academy, and as prepared for the: Chief of Naval Operations and the Commandant, US Marine Corps (Ed).
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  28. Paul T. Bartone (2010). Preventing Prisoner Abuse: Leadership Lessons of Abu Ghraib. Ethics and Behavior 20 (2):161 – 173.
    The abuse of prisoners by U.S. soldiers at Abu Ghraib had far-reaching consequences, leading many people around the world to question the legitimacy of U.S. goals and activities in Iraq. Drawing on extensive unclassified reports from multiple investigations that followed Abu Ghraib, this article considers both psychological and social-situational factors that contributed to ethical failures there. This analysis suggests that leaders need to be more attuned to the developmental stage of subordinates and take appropriate steps to reinforce ethical behaviors. From (...)
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  29. Rasmus Beckmann (2011). Clausewitz Trifft Luhmann: Eine Systemtheoretische Interpretation von Clausewitz' Handlungstheorie. Vs Verlag.
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  30. Endre Begby (2003). Liberty, Statehood and Sovereignty: Walzer on Mill on Non-Intervention. Journal of Military Ethics 2 (1):46-62.
    The purpose of this paper is to critically assess Michael Walzer's use of John Stuart Mill's text 'A Few Words on Non-Intervention' in his seminal work Just and Unjust Wars. Although point by point, I think Walzer's reading of Mill is largely sound, I will argue that the specific narrative into which Walzer orders these points places a highly tendentious spin on the original text. More precisely, Walzer's way of articulating the negative aspects of Mill's argument--the general presumption against intervention--obscures (...)
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  31. Alex Bellamy (2008). The Ethics of Terror Bombing: Beyond Supreme Emergency. Journal of Military Ethics 7 (1):41-65.
    Recent years have seen a revival of interest in Michael Walzer's doctrine of ?supreme emergency?. Simply put, the doctrine holds that, when a state confronts an opponent who threatens annihilation, it can be morally legitimate to violate one of the cardinal rules of the war convention ? the principle of non-combatant immunity. Walzer cites the case of Britain's decision to bomb German cities in 1940 as a case in point. Although the theory of supreme emergency has been scrutinised, the historical (...)
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  32. Alex J. Bellamy (2009). When is It Right to Fight? International Law and Jus Ad Bellum. Journal of Military Ethics 8 (3):231-245.
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  33. Alex J. Bellamy (2007). Editor's Introduction. Journal of Military Ethics 6 (2):89-90.
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  34. Alex J. Bellamy (2004). Motives, Outcomes, Intent and the Legitimacy of Humanitarian Intervention. Journal of Military Ethics 3 (3):216-232.
    During the 1990s, international society increasingly recognised that states who abuse their citizens in the most egregious ways ought to lose their sovereign inviolability and be subject to humanitarian intervention. The emergence of this norm has given renewed significance to the debate concerning what it is about humanitarian intervention that makes it legitimate. The most popular view is that it is humanitarian motivations that legitimise intervention. Others insist that humanitarian outcomes are more important that an actor's motivations, pointing for instance (...)
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  35. Alex Bellamy & Paul Williams (2006). The UN Security Council and the Question of Humanitarian Intervention in Darfur. Journal of Military Ethics 5 (2):144-160.
    This article explores the different moral and legal arguments used by protagonists in the debate about whether or not to conduct a humanitarian intervention in Darfur. The first section briefly outlines four moral and legal positions on whether there is (and should be) a right and/or duty of humanitarian intervention: communitarianism, restrictionist and counter-restrictionist legal positivism and liberal cosmopolitanism. The second section then provides an overview of the Security Council's debate about responding to Darfur's crisis, showing how its policy was (...)
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  36. Eyal Ben-Ari (2009). Between Violence and Restraint : Human Rights, Humanitarian Considerations, and the Israeli Military in the Al-Aqsa Intifada. In Ted van Baarda & Désirée Verweij (eds.), The Moral Dimension of Asymmetrical Warfare: Counter-Terrorism, Democratic Values and Military Ethics. Martinus Nijhoff.
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  37. S. R. Benatar (1993). Medical Ethics in Times of War and Insurrection: Rights and Duties. [REVIEW] Journal of Medical Humanities 14 (3):137-147.
    The military might of the modern era poses devastating threats to humankind. Wars result from struggles for material or ideological power. In this context the probability of flouting agreements made during peaceful times is great. The rights of victims and the rights of medical personnel are vulnerable to State and military momentum in the quest for sovereignty. Scholars, scientists and physicians enjoy little enough influence during times of peace and we should be sanguine about their influence during war. But we (...)
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  38. Yitzhak Benbaji (2010). Dehumanization, Lesser Evil and the Supreme Emergency Exemption. Diametros 23:5-21.
    Many believe that if the indiscriminate bombings of German cities at the beginning of World War II were necessary for preventing unlimited spread of Nazism, then the bombings were justified. For, the outcome, in which innocent Germans living in Nazi Germany are killed, was not as bad as the outcome in which the Nazis inflict ethnic cleansing and enslavement on a massive scale. Recently, however, Daniel Statman has advanced a powerful case against this type of justification. I aim in this (...)
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  39. David Benest (2009). British Leaders and Irregular Warfare. In Ted van Baarda & Désirée Verweij (eds.), The Moral Dimension of Asymmetrical Warfare: Counter-Terrorism, Democratic Values and Military Ethics. Martinus Nijhoff.
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  40. Paul T. Berghaus & Nathan L. Cartagena (2014). Developing Good Soldiers: The Problem of Fragmentation Within the Army. Journal of Military Ethics 12 (4):287-303.
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  41. Jean Bethke Elshtain (2007). Terrorism, Regime Change, and Just War: Reflections on Michael Walzer. Journal of Military Ethics 6 (2):131-137.
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  42. Joseph Betz (2002). Kerrey and Calley. International Journal of Applied Philosophy 16 (2):139-152.
    Lieutenant Bob Kerrey, later Governor and Senator Kerrey, revealed in the spring of 2001 that he was being accused by a former military subordinate that he had ordered a massacre during the Vietnamese War. Kerrey denied most parts of the charge. If guilty, however, he would be a war criminal of roughly the same kind that a court martial found Lieutenant Rusty Calley to be. I examine the available evidence and argue that a court martial would probably find Kerrey guilty (...)
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  43. Lt Col Wayne Beyer (2013). Military Ethics: An Introduction with Case Studies. Journal of Military Ethics 12 (1):88-89.
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  44. Wayne Beyer (2013). Military Ethics: An Introduction with Case Studies. Journal of Military Ethics 12 (1):88-89.
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  45. Camillo Bica (2007). Opposing a War and/or Supporting the Warrior: The Moral Obligations of Citizens in an Immoral War. Journal of Social Philosophy 38 (4):627–643.
  46. Jamie Bisher (2007). White Terror: Cossack Warlords of the Trans-Siberian. Journal of Military Ethics 6 (3):253.
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  47. Roland Bleiker (2008). Review of America Town: Building the Outposts of Empire by Mark L. Gillem. [REVIEW] Journal of Military Ethics 7 (2):160-161.
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  48. Daniel Blocq (2006). The Fog of UN Peacekeeping: Ethical Issues Regarding the Use of Force to Protect Civilians in UN Operations. Journal of Military Ethics 5 (3):201-213.
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  49. Richard Blucher (2003). Jonathan Shay's Achilles in Vietnam and Odysseus in America. Journal of Military Ethics 2 (2):160-167.
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  50. Lene Bomann-Larsen (2004). Licence to Kill? The Question of Just Vs. Unjust Combatants. Journal of Military Ethics 3 (2):142-160.
    This paper questions the moral foundations of the equal war-right to kill in international law. Although there seems to be a moral difference between fighting a just and unjust war, this need not reflect on our moral assessment of soldiers, since unjust combatants can be non-culpable by virtue of excuse. Under the aspect of immunity from blame, an equal war-right to kill is upheld, and belligerent equality restored among innocents. It must therefore be proven that innocent threats can be justifiably (...)
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