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  1. Mark Alfino & G. Randolph Mayes (2001). Rationality and the Right to Privacy. In Daniel Bonevac (ed.), Today's Moral Issues. Mayfield Publishing.
    When tennis fan Jane Bronstein attended the 1995 U.S. Open she probably knew there was a remote chance her image would end up on television screens around the world. But she surely did not know she was at risk of becoming the object of worldwide attention on the David Letterman Show. As it happened, Letterman spotted an unflattering clip from the U.S. Open showing a heavyset Bronstein with peach juice dripping down her chin. Not only did he show the footage (...)
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  2. Georgia Apostolopoulou (2007). Toward a Hermeneutic Anthropology of Human Rights. The Proceedings of the Twenty-First World Congress of Philosophy 3:151-156.
    The hermeneutic anthropology of human rights is a possible anthropology before human rights. It does not aim at a deductive demonstration of the validity of human rights, but it delivers a hermeneutic justification of them by taking into account the a priori link of self-understanding with living body. Three aspects are most relevant in this case: a) The human person not only exists, but also has a value which is recognized within the shared world of persons. The embodied presence of (...)
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  3. Daniel A. Bonevac (ed.) (2001). Today's Moral Issues: Classic and Contemporary Perspectives. Mcgraw Hill.
    Designed for contemporary moral problems courses, Bonevac's Today's Moral Issues is unique in providing theoretical readings related to the contemporary issues readings that follow; students connect theory and practice, thereby making the theory interesting and relevant. In addition to providing readings on contemporary topics, the book lends historical perspective to current moral issues with its unique inclusion of classic selections by philosophers such as Aristotle, Mill, Kant, and Locke.
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  4. J. T. Eberl, E. D. Kinney & M. J. Williams (2012). Foundation For A Natural Right To Health Care. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 36 (6):537-557.
    Discussions concerning whether there is a natural right to health care may occur in various forms, resulting in policy recommendations for how to implement any such right in a given society. But health care policies may be judged by international standards including the United Nations’ Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR). The rights enumerated in the UDHR are grounded in traditions of moral theory, a philosophical analysis of which is necessary in order to adjudicate the value of specific policies designed (...)
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  5. Alejandra Mancilla (forthcoming). The Environmental Turn in Territorial Rights. [REVIEW] Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy.
    Recent theories of territorial rights could be characterized by their growing attention to environmental concerns and resource rights (understood as the rights of jurisdiction and/or ownership over natural resources). Here I examine two: Avery Kolers’s theory of ethnogeographical plenitude, and Cara Nine’s theory of legitimate political authority over people and resources. While Kolers is a pioneer in demanding ecological sustainability as a minimum requirement for any viable theory of territorial rights – building a bridge between environmental and political philosophy – (...)
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  6. Manuel Toscano (2012). Language Rights as Collective Rights: Some Conceptual Considerations on Language Rights. Res Publica 27:109-118.
    Stephen May (2011) holds that language rights have been insufficiently recognized, or just rejected as problematic, in human rights theory and practice. Defending the “human rights approach to language rights”, he claims that language rights should be accorded the status of fundamental human rights, recognized as such by states and international organizations. This article argues that the notion of language rights is far from clear. According to May, one key reason for rejecting the claim that language rights should be considered (...)
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Corporate Rights
  1. David T. Risser (1996). The Social Dimension of Moral Responsibility: Taking Organizations Seriously. Journal of Social Philosophy 27 (1):189-207.
    This article provides a justification for holding complex organizations morally responsible and shows how this moral dimension is implicit in the concept of power. Several objections to organizational moral responsibility are addressed, and a new view of complex organizations as agents which are morally responsible, but do not possess moral rights, is defended.
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Environmental Rights
  1. Timo Airaksinen (1988). Original Populations and Environmental Rights. Journal of Applied Philosophy 5 (1):37-47.
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  2. Bertram Bandman (1982). Do Future Generations Have the Right to Breathe Clean Air? A Note. Political Theory 10 (1):95-102.
  3. Ken A. Bryson (2008). Negotiating Environmental Rights. Ethics, Place and Environment 11 (3):351 – 366.
    Environmental ethics arises as the output of a trade-off between our rights and nature's right to life. This negotiation secures the possibility of achieving sustainable developments, if it is conducted fairly. The rights of persons are delimited by their origin, as are the rights of the other. A person is the output of relationships taking place at three levels: (1) a material self; (2) a social self; and (3) a private or internal self. Pollution and war serve as an epitaph (...)
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  4. H. Sterling Burnett (2010). Rights, Pollution, and Public Policy. In Christi Favor, Gerald F. Gaus & Julian Lamont (eds.), Essays on Philosophy, Politics & Economics: Integration & Common Research Projects. Stanford Economics and Finance.
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  5. John H. Knox, Diagonal Environmental Rights.
    Environmental rights are diagonal if they are held by individuals or groups against the governments of states other than their own. The potential importance of such rights is obvious: governments' actions often affect the environment beyond their jurisdiction, and those who live in and rely upon the environment affected would like to be able to exercise rights against the governments causing them harm. Although international law has not adopted a comprehensive, uniform approach to such rights, human rights law and international (...)
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  6. Chris Miller (2003). Environmental Rights in a Welfare State? A Comment on DeMerieux. Oxford Journal of Legal Studies 23 (1):111-125.
    The derivation of a category of ‘environmental rights’ (as argued in this journal by Margaret DeMerieux) from certain cases heard in the European Court of Human Rights is examined. Opposing the majority judicial opinion of that court, there is emerging a dissenting view which is reluctant to extend a rights perspective to those nuisances which can, in theory, be avoided by relocation of the family home. This critique is then extended to Marcic v Thames Water Utilities in which the claimant (...)
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Natural Rights
  1. Susan Leigh Anderson (1995). Natural Rights and the Individualism Versus Collectivism Debate. Journal of Value Inquiry 29 (3):307-316.
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  2. Jeremy Bentham, Critique of the Doctrine of Inalienable, Natural Rights.
    The Declaration of Rights -- I mean the paper published under that name by the French National Assembly in 1791 -- assumes for its subject-matter a field of disquisition as unbounded in point of extent as it is important in its nature. But the more ample the extent given to any proposition or string of propositions, the more difficult it is to keep the import of it confined without deviation, within the bounds of truth and reason. If in the smallest (...)
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  3. Christopher Bertram, Natural Rights to Migration?
    It is often claimed that states enjoy, as a consequence of their sovereign status, the right to control the passage of outsiders through their territory and that they have a discretion to admit or to refuse to admit outsiders, whether those outsiders be tourists, business travelers, would-be economic migrants, or even refugees. Or, to be more exact, such limitations on that right to control are derived from the agreement of states to treaties and conventions, agreement which they could have withheld (...)
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  4. Larry Biesenthal (1978). Natural Rights and Natural Assets. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 8 (2):153-171.
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  5. Ralph Mason Blake (1925). On Natural Rights. International Journal of Ethics 36 (1):86-96.
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  6. Joseph M. Boyle Jr (1981). Natural Law and Natural Rights. New Scholasticism 55 (2):245-247.
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  7. John Christman (1986). Can Ownership Be Justified by Natural Rights? Philosophy and Public Affairs 15 (2):156-177.
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  8. Jonathan Crowe, Explaining Natural Rights: Ontological Freedom and the Foundations of Political Discourse.
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  9. Derrick Darby (1999). Are Worlds Without Natural Rights Morally Impoverished? Southern Journal of Philosophy 37 (3):397-417.
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  10. Douglas J. den Uyl & Douglas B. Rasmussen (2001). Ethical Individualism, Natural Law, and the Primacy of Natural Rights. Social Philosophy and Policy 18 (1):34-69.
    Whether or not Strauss's observation is historically accurate, it does suggest two sets of questions for philosophical examination. (1) Is Strauss correct to view natural duties and natural rights as the same type of ethical concept? Do they serve the same function? Do they work on the same level, and are they necessarily in competition with each other? (2) Does saying that the individual human being is the center of the moral world require that one reject the idea of a (...)
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  11. H. Dendy (1895). Book Review:Natural Rights. David G. Ritchie. [REVIEW] Ethics 5 (4):521-.
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  12. Robert Paul Finch (1975). Defining 'Natural Rights': A Problem and Solution Considered. Southern Journal of Philosophy 13 (3):287-295.
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  13. John Finnis (1980/1979). Natural Law and Natural Rights. Oxford University Press.
    This new edition includes a substantial postscript by the author, in which he responds to thirty years of discussion, criticism and further work in the field to ...
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  14. Samuel Gregg (2009). Metaphysics and Modernity: Natural Law and Natural Rights in Gershom Carmichael and Francis Hutcheson. Journal of Scottish Philosophy 7 (1):87-102.
    This paper argues that the founding fathers of the tradition of Scottish Enlightenment natural jurisprudence, Gersholm Carmichael (1672–1729) and Francis Hutcheson (1694–1746), articulated a view of rights that is pertinent to the contemporary dominance of the language of rights. Maintaining a metaphysical foundation for rights while drawing upon the early-modern Protestant natural law tradition, their conception of rights is more significantly indebted to the pre-modern scholastic natural law tradition than often realized. This is illustrated by exploring some of the background (...)
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  15. Arthur Leon Harding (1955). Natural Law and Natural Rights. Dallas, Southern Methodist University Press.
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  16. James A. Harris (2003). :Natural Rights on the Threshold of the Scottish Enlightenment: The Writings of Gershom Carmichael. Journal of Scottish Philosophy 1 (2):175-179.
  17. H. L. A. Hart (1955). Are There Any Natural Rights? Philosophical Review 64 (2):175-191.
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  18. John Hasnas (2005). Toward a Theory of Empirical Natural Rights. Social Philosophy and Policy 22 (1):111-147.
    Natural rights theorists such as John Locke and Robert Nozick provide arguments for limited government that are grounded on the individual's possession of natural rights to life, liberty, and property. Resting on natural rights, such arguments can be no more persuasive than the underlying arguments for the existence of such rights, which are notoriously weak. In this article, John Hasnas offers an alternative conception of natural rights, “empirical natural rights,” that are not beset by the objections typically raised against traditional (...)
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  19. Thomas Hurka (1989). Sumner on Natural Rights. Dialogue 28 (01):117-.
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  20. Peter Ingram (1981). Natural Rights: A Reappraisal. [REVIEW] Journal of Value Inquiry 15 (1):3-18.
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  21. J. J. Jenkins (1967). Locke and Natural Rights. Philosophy 42 (160):149 - 154.
  22. John Kilcullen, Medieval Theories of Natural Rights.
    From the 12 th century onwards, medieval canon lawyers and, from the early 14 th century, theologians and philosophers began to use ius to mean a right, and developed a theory of natural rights, the predecessor of modern theories of human rights. The main applications of this theory were in respect of property and government.
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  23. Richard Kraut (1996). Are There Natural Rights in Aristotle? Review of Metaphysics 49 (4):755 - 774.
  24. H. D. Lewis (1938). Some Observations on Natural Rights and the General Will (II.). Mind 47 (185):18-44.
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  25. H. D. Lewis (1937). Some Observations on Natural Rights and the General Will (I). Mind 46 (184):437-453.
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  26. Jon W. Lowry (1975). Natural Rights. Southwestern Journal of Philosophy 6 (2):109-122.
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  27. Neil Luebke (1970). Hart on Natural Rights. Southwestern Journal of Philosophy 1 (3):32-37.
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  28. Korey D. Maas (2011). Natural Science, Natural Rights, and Natural Law : Abortion in Historical Perspective. In Robert C. Baker & Roland Cap Ehlke (eds.), Natural Law: A Lutheran Reappraisal. Concordia Pub. House.
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  29. Tibor R. Machan (1990). Natural Rights Liberalism. Philosophy and Theology 4 (3):253-265.
    Classical Iiberalism has at least two distinct strains. Its natural rights version requires extensive use of moral concepts. Some denigrate this tradition on grounds that it has been made obsolete by empiricist epistemology and materialist metaphysics. Since that tradition requires knowledge of moral truth and since empiricism precludes this, the tradition is hopeless. Since it also requires a teleological explanation of human action, and since mechanism precludes this, the hopelessness of the tradition is compounded. I argue that neither the empiricist (...)
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  30. Eric Mack (2012). Lysander Spooner: Nineteenth-Century America's Last Natural Rights Theorist. Social Philosophy and Policy 29 (2):139-176.
    The main purpose of this essay is to articulate the ideas of the last powerful advocate of natural rights in nineteenth-century America. That last powerful advocate was the Massachusetts-born radical libertarian Lysander Spooner (1808-1887). Besides his powerful antebellum attacks on slavery, Spooner developed forceful arguments on behalf of a strongly individualistic conception of natural law and private property rights and against coercive moralism, coercive paternalism, and state authority and legislation. This essay focuses on the theoretical core of Spoonera doctrine that (...)
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  31. Eric Mack (2007). Scanlon as Natural Rights Theorist. Politics, Philosophy and Economics 6 (1):45-73.
    This article examines the character of Scanlon’s contractualism as presented in What We Owe to Each Other . I offer a range of reasons for thinking of Scanlon’s contractualism as a species of natural rights theorizing. I argue that to affirm the principle that actions are wrongful if and only if they are disallowed by principles that people could not reasonably reject is equivalent to affirming a natural right (of an admittedly non-standard sort) against being subject to such reasonably disallowed (...)
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  32. Eric Mack (1980). Locke's Arguments for Natural Rights. Southwestern Journal of Philosophy 11 (1):51-60.
  33. Virpi Mäkinen (2010). Self-Preservation and Natural Rights in Late Medieval and Early Modern Political Thought. In , The Nature of Rights: Moral and Political Aspects of Rights in Late Medieval and Early Modern Philosophy. The Philosophical Society of Finland.
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  34. Peter J. Markie (1978). Mack on Promises and Natural Rights. Ethics 88 (3):263-265.
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  35. Thomas Mautner (1981). Natural Rights in Locke. Philosophical Topics 12 (3):73-77.
  36. A. S. McGrade (1996). Aristotle's Place in the History of Natural Rights. Review of Metaphysics 49 (4):803 - 829.
  37. George H. Mead (1915). Natural Rights and the Theory of the Political Institution. Journal of Philosophy, Psychology and Scientific Methods 12 (6):141-155.
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