This category needs an editor. We encourage you to help if you are qualified.
Volunteer, or read more about what this involves.
Related categories
Subcategories:
569 found
Search inside:
(import / add options)   Sort by:
1 — 50 / 569
Material to categorize
  1. Isam Alawneh, Modeling of the Backscatter Behaviour of Typical Antipersonnel Mines by Computer Simulations and Expertimental Tests.
    The results from calculations of the backscattered electric fields from Antipersonnel landmines as a function of frequency may be called the fingerprints characteristics of the specific antipersonnel land mine. To model these mines, two numerical methods have been used, these methods are the FDTD and the MoM. The calculation of the signatures show significant characteristic signatures of the different types of mines as a function of frequency, the dielectric properties of the explosive, the geometrical shape, small changes in mine construction (...)
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Chiara Ambrosio, From Similarity to Homomorphism: Toward a Pragmatic Account of Representation in Art and Science, 1880-1914.
    The years 1880-1914 were a time of intense experimentation in the visual arts. Representative conventions became variable, and artists deliberately departed from a concept of depiction considered as physical resemblance or photographic similarity. Visual representations progressed toward a conceptualization of figures and objects that transcended perceptual data, and the rendering of pictorial objects turned into an experiment involving complex visualization processes. This paper explores the interplay between artistic and scientific representative practices between 1880 and 1914. I argue that science and (...)
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. G. W. R. Ardley (1965). Models and Analogies in Science. Philosophical Studies 14:231-232.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. P. Auger & C. Bougarel (1965). Models in Science. Diogenes 13 (52):1-13.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. William F. Barr (1971). A Syntactic and Semantic Analysis of Idealizations in Science. Philosophy of Science 38 (2):258-272.
    Various laws and theories in the natural and social sciences are presented with a view to discerning the syntactic and semantic characteristics of many idealizations in science. Three different kinds of idealizations are discussed: ideal conditions, ideal cases, and idealized theories. An ideal condition is a formula in which state variables occur, whose existential closure is false, and for which there is another formula that can be constructed out of the original formula such that the existential closure of the new (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. William Frank Barr (1969). A Philosophical Analysis of Idealizations in Science. Dissertation, The University of Rochester
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Jeffrey A. Barrett (2009). Scientific Representation. Journal of Philosophy 106 (11):634-639.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Michael Baur (1990). On the Aim of Scientific Theories in Relating to the World: A Defence of the Semantic Account. Dialogue 29 (03):323-.
  9. John Beatty (1987). On Behalf of the Semantic View. Biology and Philosophy 2 (1):17-23.
    responses to Sloep and Van der Steen, Biol. Philos. 1987 (2)33.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Yemima Ben-Menahem (1988). Models of Science: Fictions or Idealizations? Science in Context 2 (1).
    Remove from this list | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. William F. Brewer (2001). Models in Science and Mental Models in Scientists and Nonscientists. Mind and Society 2 (2):33-48.
    This paper examines the form of mental representation of scientific theories in scientists and nonscientists. It concludes that images and schemas are not the appropriate form of mental representation for scientific theories but that mental models and perceptual symbols do seem appropriate for representing physical/mechanical phenomena. These forms of mental representation are postulated to have an analogical relation with the world and it is this relationship that gives them strong explanatory power. It is argued that the construct of naïve theories (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Harold I. Brown (1979). A Functional Analysis of Scientific Theories. Journal for General Philosophy of Science / Zeitschrift für Allgemeine Wissenschaftstheorie 10 (1):119-140.
    Scientific theories are analyzed in terms of the role that they play in science rather than in terms of their logical structure. It is maintained that theories: provide descriptions of the fundamental features of their domains; on the basis of 1, explain non-fundamental features of their domains; provide a guide for further research in their domains. Any set of propositions that carries out these functions with respect to some domain counts as a theory. This view of theories is developed and (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. Fernando Flores Camacho & Leticia Gallegos Cazares (1998). Partial Possible Models: An Approach to Interpret Students' Physical Representation. Science Education 82 (1):15-29.
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. Walter Dean, Models and Recursivity.
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. Stephen M. Downes (2011). Scientific Models. Philosophy Compass 6 (11):757-764.
    This contribution provides an assessment of the epistemological role of scientific models. The prevalent view that all scientific models are representations of the world is rejected. This view points to a unified way of resolving epistemic issues for scientific models. The emerging consensus in philosophy of science that models have many different epistemic roles in science is presented and defended.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. Steffen Ducheyne (2012). Scientific Representations as Limiting Cases. Erkenntnis 76 (1):73-89.
    In this essay, I shall show that the so-called inferential (Suárez 2003 and 2004 ) and interpretational (Contessa 2007 ) accounts of scientific representation are respectively unsatisfactory and too weak to account for scientific representation ( pars destruens ). Along the way, I shall also argue that the pragmatic similarity (Giere 2004 and Giere 2010 ) and the partial isomorphism (da Costa and French 2003 and French 2003 ) accounts are unable to single out scientific representation. In the pars construens (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. Steffen Ducheyne (2005). Lessons From Galileo: The Pragmatic Model of Shared Characteristics of Scientific Representation. Philosophia Naturalis 42 (2):213-234.
    In this paper I will defend a new account of scientific representation. I will begin by looking at the benefits and drawbacks of two recent accounts on scientific representation: Hughes’ DDI account and Suárez’ inferential account. Next I use some of Galileo’s models in the Discorsi as a heuristic tool for a better account of scientific representation. Next I will present my model. The main idea of my account, which I refer to as the pragmatic model of shared characteristics (PMSC), (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. Bruce Edmonds, Bootstrapping Knowledge About Social Phenomena Using Simulation Models.
    Formidable difficulties face anyone trying to model social phenomena using a formal system, such as a computer program. The differences between formal systems and complex, multi-facetted and meaning-laden social systems are so fundamental that many will criticise any attempt to bridge this gap. Despite this, there are those who are so bullish about the project of social simulation that they appear to believe that simple computer models, that are also useful and reliable indicators of how aspects of society works, are (...)
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. Bruce Edmonds, The Use of Models.
    The use of MABS (Multi-Agent Based Simulations) is analysed as the modelling of distributed (usually social) systems using MAS as the model structure. It is argued that rarely is direct modelling of target systems attempted but rather an abstraction of the target systems is modelled and insights gained about the abstraction then applied back to the target systems. The MABS modelling process is divided into six steps: abstraction, design, inference, analysis, interpretation and application. Some types of MABS papers are characterised (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. James H. Fetzer (1999). The Role Of Models In Computer Science. The Monist 82 (1):20-36.
    Taking Brian Cantwell Smith’s study, “Limits of Correctness in Computers,” as its point of departure, this article explores the role of models in computer science. Smith identifies two kinds of models that play an important role, where specifications are models of problems and programs are models of possible solutions. Both presuppose the existence of conceptualizations as ways of conceiving the world “in certain delimited ways.” But high-level programming languages also function as models of virtual (or abstract) machines, while low-level programming (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. Steven French (2003). A Model‐Theoretic Account of Representation (or, I Don't Know Much About Art…but I Know It Involves Isomorphism). Philosophy of Science 70 (5):1472-1483.
    Discussions of representation in science tend to draw on examples from art. However, such examples need to be handled with care given a) the differences between works of art and scientific theories and b) the accommodation of these examples within certain philosophies of art. I shall examine the claim that isomorphism is neither necessary nor sufficient for representation and I shall argue that there exist accounts of representation in both art and science involving isomorphism which accommodate the apparent counterexamples and, (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. Mathias Frisch (2014). Models and Scientific Representations Or: Who is Afraid of Inconsistency? Synthese 191 (13):3027-3040.
    I argue that if we make explicit the role of the user of scientific representations not only in the application but also in the construction of a model or representation, then inconsistent modeling assumptions do not pose an insurmountable obstacle to our representational practices.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. Ronald Giere (2011). Representing with Physical Models. In Paul Humphreys & Cyrille Imbert (eds.), Models, Simulations, and Representations. Routledge
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. Ronald N. Giere (1994). The Cognitive Structure of Scientific Theories. Philosophy of Science 61 (2):276-296.
    This paper explores a new reason for preferring a model-theoretic approach to understanding the nature of scientific theories. Identifying the models in philosophers' model-theoretic accounts of theories with the concepts in cognitive scientists' accounts of categorization suggests a structure to families of models far richer than has commonly been assumed. Using classical mechanics as an example, it is argued that families of models may be "mapped" as an array with "horizontal" graded structures, multiply hierarchical "vertical" structures, and local "radial" structures. (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. Erik Götlind (1961). Two Views About the Function of Models in Empirical Theories. Theoria 27 (2):58-69.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. James Griesemer (1984). Presentations and the Status of Theories. PSA: Proceedings of the Biennial Meeting of the Philosophy of Science Association 1984:102 - 114.
    The concept of a presentation of a theory is often introduced in discussions of the "semantic view" of theories to characterize the way in which models for a theory are specified. Presentations are most often thought of as definitions of the kinds of systems represented in the models. It is argued that the concept of a presentation can be widened to permit consideration of the links between epistemologically motivated accounts of theory structure and some metaphysically motivated accounts of the growth (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  27. Philip P. Hallie (1971). Models, Burglary, and Philosophy. Philosophy and Rhetoric 4 (4):215 - 229.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. B. Hart, A. Pillay & S. Starchenko (1995). 1-Based Theories — the Main Gap for a -Models. Archive for Mathematical Logic 34 (5):285-300.
    We prove the Main Gap for the class of a -models (sufficiently saturated models) of an arbitrary stable 1-based theory T . We (i) prove a strong structure theorem for a -models, assuming NDOP, and (ii) roughly compute the number of a -models of T in any given cardinality. The analysis uses heavily group existence theorems in 1-based theories.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  29. Michael Heidelberger (2006). Applying Models in Fluid Dynamics. International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 20 (1):49 – 67.
    The following article treats the 'applicational turn' of modern fluid dynamics as it set in at the beginning of the 20th century with Ludwig Prandtl's concept of the boundary layer. It seeks to show that there is much more to applying a theory in a highly mathematical field like fluid dynamics than deriving a special case from a general explanatory theory under particular antecedent conditions. In Prandtl's case, the decisive move was to introduce a model that provided a physical/causal conception (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  30. HerfelWilliam (ed.) (1995). Theories and Models in Scientific Processes. Rodopi.
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  31. Paul Humphreys, The Truth of False Idealizations in Modeling.
    Modeling involves the use of false idealizations, yet there is typically a belief or hope that modeling somehow manages to deliver true information about the world. The paper discusses one possible way of reconciling truth and falsehood in modeling. The key trick is to relocate truth claims by reinterpreting an apparently false idealizing assumption in order to make clear what possibly true assertion is intended when using it. These include interpretations in terms of negligibility, applicability, tractability, early-step, and more. Elaborations (...)
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  32. Paul Humphreys & Cyrille Imbert (eds.) (2011). Models, Simulations, and Representations. Routledge.
    Although scientific models and simulations differ in numerous ways, they are similar in so far as they are posing essentially philosophical problems about the nature of representation. This collection is designed to bring together some of the best work on the nature of representation being done by both established senior philosophers of science and younger researchers. Most of the pieces, while appealing to existing traditions of scientific representation, explore new types of questions, such as: how understanding can be developed within (...)
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  33. Ralph Carl Kenat (1987). Physical Interpretation: Eddington, Idealization and the Origin of Stellar Structure Theory. Dissertation, University of Maryland, College Park
    This dissertation deals with several aspects of the physical interpretation of theories: the use of idealizations in scientific theorizing, the use of theories as conceptual devices and the problem of scientific realism. These issues are considered in the light of the semantic conception of theories and a case history. The case history concerns the development of models of stellar stucture from the earliest models to the "standard model" of Arthur Eddington. ;The semantic conception of theories makes it possible to give (...)
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  34. Colin Klein, Idealization in Cognitive Psychology: A Case Study.
    develops themes from the dissertation. I argue that two models of prosopagnosia are best understood as idealizing models, and as such are subject to importantly different methodological constraints from non-idealized theories of face recognition.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  35. Noretta Koertge, A Methodological Critique of the Semantic Conception of Theories.
    A new PhD slated to teach a beginning undergraduate course on scientific reasoning recently asked me to recommend topics. I launched into a description of my “baby-Popper-plus-statistics” class – give them enough deductive logic to understand the Duhemian problem, do the Galileo case study, use the notion of severe test to introduce a bit of probability theory, then segue to the problem of testing statistical hypotheses…. My interlocutor was looking impatient. “But I’m a strong adherent of the Semantic Conception of (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  36. Ronald Laymon (1987). Using Scott Domains to Explicate the Notions of Approximate and Idealized Data. Philosophy of Science 54 (2):194-221.
    This paper utilizes Scott domains (continuous lattices) to provide a mathematical model for the use of idealized and approximately true data in the testing of scientific theories. Key episodes from the history of science can be understood in terms of this model as attempts to demonstrate that theories are monotonic, that is, yield better predictions when fed better or more realistic data. However, as we show, monotonicity and truth of theories are independent notions. A formal description is given of the (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  37. Ronald Laymon (1980). Idealization, Explanation, and Confirmation. PSA: Proceedings of the Biennial Meeting of the Philosophy of Science Association 1980:336 - 350.
    The use of idealizations and approximations in scientific explanations poses a problem for traditional philosophical theories of confirmation since, strictly speaking, these sorts of statements are false. Furthermore, in several central cases in the history of science, theoretical predictions seen as confirmatory are not, in any usual sense, even approximately true. As a means of eliminating the puzzling nature of these cases, two theses are proposed. First, explanations consist of idealized deductive-nomological sketches plus what are called modal auxiliaries, i.e., arguments (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  38. Jean Leroux (2001). "Picture Theories" as Forerunners of the Semantic Approach to Scientific Theories. International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 15 (2):189 – 197.
  39. Elisabeth A. Lloyd (1988). The Semantic Approach and Its Application to Evolutionary Theory. PSA: Proceedings of the Biennial Meeting of the Philosophy of Science Association 1988:278 - 285.
    In this talk I do three things. First, I review what I take to be fruitful applications of the semantic view of theory structure to evolutionary theory. Second, I list and correct three common misunderstandings about the semantic view. Third, I evaluate the weaknesses and strengths of Horan's paper in this symposium. Specifically, I argue that the criticisms leveled against the semantic view by Horan are inappropriate because they incorporate some basic misconceptions about the semantic view itself.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  40. Michael Lynch & Ruth McNally, Encadenando a Un Monstruo : La Produccion de Representaciones En Un Campu Impuro.
    This paper analyses the topic of representation since the point of view of ethnomethodology and sociology of scientific knowledge. It starts out by discussing the “standard image of representation” and the constructivist proposition of that image. Then, a case of study is presented to suggest how practices for collecting and analyzing forensic evidence in criminal law, can contribute to understand representational adequacy. The aim of this paper is to think differently about representantion considering how it is produced, managed and deconstructed. (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  41. Robert Mellert (1973). Models and Metanoia. Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 47:142-152.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  42. Kathleen Okruhlik (2009). Scientific Representation. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 39 (4):671-694.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  43. Steven L. Peck (2008). The Hermeneutics of Ecological Simulation. Biology and Philosophy 23 (3):383-402.
    Computer simulation has become important in ecological modeling, but there have been few assessments on how complex simulation models differ from more traditional analytic models. In Part I of this paper, I review the challenges faced in complex ecological modeling and how models have been used to gain theoretical purchase for understanding natural systems. I compare the use of traditional analytic simulation models and point how that the two methods require different kinds of practical engagement. I examine a case study (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  44. Christopher Pincock (2014). How to Avoid Inconsistent Idealizations. Synthese 191 (13):2957-2972.
    Idealized scientific representations result from employing claims that we take to be false. It is not surprising, then, that idealizations are a prime example of allegedly inconsistent scientific representations. I argue that the claim that an idealization requires inconsistent beliefs is often incorrect and that it turns out that a more mathematical perspective allows us to understand how the idealization can be interpreted consistently. The main example discussed is the claim that models of ocean waves typically involve the false assumption (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  45. Karlis Podnieks (2012). Freges Puzzle From a Model-Based Point of View. The Reasoner 6 (1):5--6.
    Frege's puzzle about propositional attitude reports is considered. Proposed solution: Every utterance comes from the world model of the speaker, and sometimes it may contain references to (speaker's models of) other world models. More generally, every sentence comes from some kind of world model. It may be the world model of a (real or imagined) person, the world model represented in a novel, movie, scientific book, virtual reality, etc. In principle, even smaller informational units (stories, poems, newspaper articles, jokes, mathematical (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  46. Demetris P. Portides (2005). A Theory of Scientific Model Construction: The Conceptual Process of Abstraction and Concretisation. [REVIEW] Foundations of Science 10 (1):67-88.
    The process of abstraction and concretisation is a label used for an explicative theory of scientific model-construction. In scientific theorising this process enters at various levels. We could identify two principal levels of abstraction that are useful to our understanding of theory-application. The first level is that of selecting a small number of variables and parameters abstracted from the universe of discourse and used to characterise the general laws of a theory. In classical mechanics, for example, we select position and (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  47. Marian Przełęcki (1974). On Model Theoretic Approach to Empirical Interpretation of Scientific Theories. Synthese 26 (3-4):401 - 406.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  48. Stathos Psillos, 102 Book Reviews. [REVIEW]
    idea of a mechanical balance, described the volume of exchange of various aggregated commodities, weighted by their price, balanced against the quantity of money in the economy, weighted by the money’ s rate of circulation. Another family of models addressed issues about the gold standard and bimetallism by thinking of quantities of gold and silver as liquids in different connected reservoirs representing, alternatively, bullion and minted coin, and the way the liquids/metal/currency in one reservoir will ¯ ow into others if (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  49. Alexander Razin (2006). Models of Moral Activity. Philosophy Now 54:16-17.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  50. A. Ritterbusch (1981). Komparative Aussagemuster in Bezug Zu Komplementären Und Enkaptischen Modellen der Morphologie. Acta Biotheoretica 30 (1):49-66.
    The unity of organisms can be viewed in terms of the concepts of enkapsis and complementarity. A model (or a type) represents those properties (of elements, structure, and system) which renders cases - the organisms under consideration — comparable. Comparability is established by operations (or metamorphoses) which relate a case to a model. Therefore, the model and the operations must be enumerated together, if a certain morphology is to be established and applied. Two models, which in some way are related, (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
1 — 50 / 569