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Subcategories:History/traditions: Moral Character
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  1. Arun Agrawal (2010). Environment, Community, Government. In Ilana Feldman & Miriam Iris Ticktin (eds.), In the Name of Humanity: The Government of Threat and Care. Duke University Press.
  2. Chrisoula Andreou (2007). Morality and Psychology. Philosophy Compass 2 (1):46–55.
    This article briefly discusses the connection between moral philosophy and moral psychology, and then explores three intriguing areas of inquiry that fall within the intersection of the two fields. The areas of inquiry considered focus on (1) debates concerning the nature of moral judgments and moral motivation; (2) debates concerning good and bad character traits and character-based explanations of actions; and (3) debates concerning the role of moral rules in guiding the morally wise agent.
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  3. Chrisoula Andreou (2006). Getting On in a Varied World. Social Theory and Practice 32 (1):61-73.
    The core argument in favor of the view that immorality is a natural defect for human beings, which has been developed by Foot, assumes that if justice and compassion have important functions in human survival and reproduction, then injustice and cruelty are natural defects in human beings. But this ignores possibilities and results that cannot reasonably be ignored. Multiple and mixed naturally sound types can and do occur in nature. Moreover, research in the life sciences suggests that at least some (...)
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  4. Sara Antill (2013). Grit. Powerkids Press.
    Ingredients for success -- What is grit? -- Keep going! -- Setting goals -- Grit on the baseball field -- Finding solutions -- Finding grit in others -- Showing your grit -- Finding a balance -- My report card: grit.
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  5. Shalom Arush (2010). The Garden of Riches: A Practical Guide to Financial Success. Chut Shel Chessed.
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  6. Shalom Arush (2007). Sefer Be-Gan Ha-Osher: Madrikh Maʻaśi la-ʻashir Ha-Amiti. Mosdot "Ḥuṭ Shel Ḥesed".
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  7. Stephen T. Asma (2012). Against Fairness. The University of Chicago Press.
    Even Jesus had a favorite -- Saints and favorites -- Fairness, tribes, and nephews -- Classic cases of favoritism -- To thy own tribe be true: biological favoritism -- Moral gravity -- The biochemistry of favoritism -- Humans are wired for favoritism -- A healthy addiction -- Flexible favoritism -- Kin selection -- Rational or emotional motives -- Conflicting brain systems -- Facts and values -- In praise of exceptions -- Building the grid of impartiality -- Going off the grid (...)
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  8. Neera Kapur Badhwar (ed.) (1993). Friendship: A Philosophical Reader. Cornell University Press.
    Introduction: The Nature and Signif1cance of Friendship Neera Kapur Badhwar Philosophers have long recognized that friendship plays a central role in a ...
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  9. Jason Baehr (2010). Epistemic malevolence. Metaphilosophy 41 (1):189-213.
    Abstract: Against the background of a great deal of structural symmetry between intellectual and moral virtue and vice, it is a surprising fact that what is arguably the central or paradigm moral vice—that is, moral malevolence or malevolence proper—has no obvious or well-known counterpart among the intellectual vices. The notion of "epistemic malevolence" makes no appearance on any standard list of intellectual vices; nor is it central to our ordinary ways of thinking about intellectual vice. In this essay, I argue (...)
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  10. Annette C. Baier (2007). Trust, Suffering, and the Aesculapian Virtues. In Rebecca L. Walker & P. J. Ivanhoe (eds.), Working Virtue: Virtue Ethics and Contemporary Moral Problems. Oxford University Press. 136--153.
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  11. F. G. Bailey (1993). The Kingdom of Individuals: An Essay on Self-Respect and Social Obligation. Cornell University Press.
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  12. John Balguy (1728/1976). The Foundation of Moral Goodness. Garland Pub..
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  13. Heather Battaly (2010). Epistemic Self-Indulgence. Metaphilosophy 41 (1):214-234.
    I argue in this essay that there is an epistemic analogue of moral self-indulgence. Section 1 analyzes Aristotle's notion of moral temperance, and its corresponding vices of self-indulgence and insensibility. Section 2 uses Aristotle's notion of moral self-indulgence as a model for epistemic self-indulgence. I argue that one is epistemically self-indulgent only if one either : (ESI1) desires, consumes, and enjoys appropriate and inappropriate epistemic objects; or (ESI2) desires, consumes, and enjoys epistemic objects at appropriate and inappropriate times; or (ESI3) (...)
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  14. Heather Battaly (2010). Introduction: Virtue and Vice. Metaphilosophy 41 (1):1-21.
    Abstract: This introduction to the collection Virtue and Vice, Moral and Epistemic addresses three main questions: (1) What is a virtue theory in ethics or epistemology? (2) What is a virtue? and (3) What is a vice? (1) It suggests that a virtue theory takes the virtues and vices of agents to be more fundamental than evaluations of acts or beliefs, and defines right acts or justified beliefs in terms of the virtues. (2) It argues that there are two important (...)
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  15. Heather D. Battaly (ed.) (2010). Virtue and Vice, Moral and Epistemic. Wiley-Blackwell.
    Machine generated contents note: Notes on Contributors -- Introduction: Virtue and Vice: Heather Battaly -- 1. Virtue Ethics and Virtue Epistemology: Roger Crisp -- 2. Exemplarist Virtue Theory: Linda Zagzebski -- 3. Right Act, Virtuous Motive: Thomas Hurka -- 4. Agency Ascriptions in Ethics and Epistemology: Or, Navigating Intersections, Narrow and Broad: Guy Axtell -- 5. Virtues, Social Roles, and Contextualism: Sarah Wright -- 6. Virtue, Emotion, and Attention: Michael S. Brady -- 7. Feeling Without Thinking: Lessons from the Ancients (...)
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  16. Per Bauhn (2003). The Value of Courage. Nordic Academic Press.
    Combining in-depth analysis with strikingly apt examples of the role that courage plays in the life of human beings, this major contribution to moral philosophy argues that courage is necessary to personal achievement as well as to the common good of a civic community. Bauhn insists that courage is necessary for reinforcing people's understanding of themselves as autonomous agents, which is in turn necessary for countering widespread feelings of alienation and depression. He defines courage as the ability to confront fear, (...)
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  17. Anne Margaret Baxley (2005). The Practical Significance of Taste in Kant's Critique of Judgment: Love of Natural Beauty as a Mark of Moral Character. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 63 (1):33–45.
  18. Richard Allan Beck (2012). Unclean. Lutterworth Press.
    Introduction: Mercy and sacrifice -- pt. 1. Unclean. Darwin and disgust -- Contamination and contagion -- pt. 2. Purity. Morality and metaphors -- Divinity and dumbfounding -- pt. 3. Hospitality. Love and boundaries -- Monsters and scapegoats -- Contempt and heresy -- Hospitality and embrace -- pt. 4. Mortality. Body and death -- Sex and privy -- Need and incarnation -- Conclusion: Elimination and regulation.
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  19. Derrick A. Bell (2002). Ethical Ambition: Living a Life of Meaning and Worth. Distributed by Holtzbrinck Publishers.
    From the New York Times bestselling author Derrick Bell, a profound meditation on achieving success with integrity. As one of the country's most influential law professors, Derrick Bell has spent a lifetime helping students struggling to maintain a sense of integrity in the face of an overwhelming pressure to succeed at any price. Frequently asked how he managed to be so extraordinarily successful while never giving up the fight for justice and equality, Bell decided to spend his seventieth year writing (...)
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  20. Macalester Bell (2011). Globalist Attitudes and the Fittingness Objection. Philosophical Quarterly 61 (244):449-472.
    Some attitudes typically take whole persons as their objects. Shame, contempt, disgust and admiration have this feature, as do many tokens of love and hate. Objectors complain that these ‘globalist attitudes’ can never fit their targets and thus can never be all-things-considered appropriate. Those who dismiss all globalist attitudes in this way are misguided. The fittingness objection depends on an inaccurate view of the person-assessments at the heart of the globalist attitudes. Once we understand the nature of globalist attitudes and (...)
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  21. M. Bergmann, M. Murray & M. Rae (eds.) (2010). Divine Evil?, the Moral Character of the God of Abraham. Oxford Up.
    This volume brings together eleven original essays representing the views of both critics and defenders of the character of God as portrayed in these texts.
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  22. João Biehl (2010). Medication is Me Now? : Human Values and Political Life in the Wake of Global AIDS Treatment. In Ilana Feldman & Miriam Iris Ticktin (eds.), In the Name of Humanity: The Government of Threat and Care. Duke University Press.
  23. Lawrence Blum (2007). Racial Virtues. In Rebecca L. Walker & P. J. Ivanhoe (eds.), Working Virtue: Virtue Ethics and Contemporary Moral Problems. Oxford University Press.
  24. Lawrence A. Blum (1980). Friendship, Altruism, and Morality. Routledge & Kegan Paul.
    Good,No Highlights,No Markup,all pages are intact, Slight Shelfwear,may have the corners slightly dented, may have slight color changes/slightly damaged spine.
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  25. Jeffrey Blustein (2007). Doctoring and Self-Forgiveness. In Rebecca L. Walker & P. J. Ivanhoe (eds.), Working Virtue: Virtue Ethics and Contemporary Moral Problems. Oxford University Press. 87--112.
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  26. Leonardo Boff (2008). Homem: Satã Ou Anjo Bom? Editora Record.
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  27. Albert Borgmann (2007). Science and Virtue: An Essay on the Impact of the Scientific Mentality on Moral Character. Review of Metaphysics 61 (2):405-407.
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  28. Marshell Carl Bradley & Philip Blosser (eds.) (1989). Of Friendship: Philosophic Selections on a Perennial Concern. Longwood Academic.
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  29. Michael S. Brady (2010). Virtue, Emotion, and Attention. Metaphilosophy 41 (1):115-131.
    The perceptual model of emotions maintains that emotions involve, or are at least analogous to, perceptions of value. On this account, emotions purport to tell us about the evaluative realm, in much the same way that sensory perceptions inform us about the sensible world. An important development of this position, prominent in recent work by Peter Goldie amongst others, concerns the essential role that virtuous habits of attention play in enabling us to gain perceptual and evaluative knowledge. I think that (...)
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  30. N. Brender (2001). Kant's Conception of Moral Character: The "Critical" Link of Morality, Anthropology, and Reflective Judgment. Philosophical Review 110 (3):440-443.
  31. Todd Calder (2003). The Apparent Banality of Evil: The Relationship Between Evil Acts and Evil Character. Journal of Social Philosophy 34 (3):364–376.
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  32. Archibald Campbell (1733/1994). An Enquiry Into the Original of Moral Virtue. Routledge/Thoemmes Press.
    This is the third selection of major works on the Scottish Enlightenment and includes the same combination of hard-to-find and popular works as in the two previous collections. Contents: An Essay on the Natural Equality of Men [1793] William Lawrence Brown, New introduction by Dr. William Scott 308 pp An Enquiry into the Origin of Moral Virtue [1733] Archibald Campbell 586 pp The Philosophical Works [1765] William Dudgeon, New introduction by David Berman 300 pp Institutes of Moral Philosophy For the (...)
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  33. John Casey (1990). Pagan Virtue: An Essay in Ethics. Oxford University Press.
    The study of the virtues has largely dropped out of modern philosophy, yet it was the predominant tradition in ethics fom the ancient Greeks until Kant. Traditionally the study of the virtues was also the study of what constituted a successful and happy life. Drawing on such diverse sources as Aristotle, Augustine, Aquinas, Shakespeare, Hume, Jane Austen, Hegel, Nietzsche, and Sartre, Casey here argues that the classical virtues of courage, temperance, practical wisdom, and justice centrally define the good for humans, (...)
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  34. Matthew Cashen & Larry May (2004). The Happy Immoralist: Reply to Cahn. Journal of Social Philosophy 35 (1):16–17.
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  35. Pierre Caye (2008). Morale Et Chaos: Principes d'Un Agir Sans Fondement. Cerf.
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  36. Yangguo Cheng & Shiyou Zhan (eds.) (2008). Rong Ru Guan Yu He Xie Wen Hua Yan Jiu. Ren Min Chu Ban She.
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  37. André Comte-Sponville (2002). A Short Treatise on the Great Virtues: The Uses of Philosophy in Everyday Life. Heinemann.
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  38. André Comte-Sponville (2001). A Small Treatise on the Great Virtues: The Uses of Philosophy in Everyday Life. Metropolitan Books.
    An utterly original exploration of the timeless human virtues and how they apply to the way we live now, from a bold and dynamic French writer. In this graceful, incisive book, writer-philosopher André Comte-Sponville reexamines the classic human virtues to help us under-stand "what we should do, who we should be, and how we should live." In the process, he gives us an entirely new perspective on the value, the relevance, and even the charm of the Western ethical tradition. Drawing (...)
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  39. Amy Coplan (2010). Feeling Without Thinking: Lessons From the Ancients on Emotion and Virtue-Acquisition. Metaphilosophy 41 (1):132-151.
    By briefly sketching some important ancient accounts of the connections between psychology and moral education, I hope to illuminate the significance of the contemporary debate on the nature of emotion and to reveal its stakes. I begin the essay with a brief discussion of intellectualism in Socrates and the Stoics, and Plato's and Posidonius's respective attacks against it. Next, I examine the two current leading philosophical accounts of emotion: the cognitive theory and the noncognitive theory. I maintain that the noncognitive (...)
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  40. Timothy M. Costelloe (2001). Review: Munzel, Kant's Conception of Moral Character: The "Critical" Link of Morality, Anthropology, and Reflective Judgment. Journal of the History of Philosophy 39 (3):445-446.
  41. John Cottingham (1998). Philosophy and the Good Life: Reason and the Passions in Greek, Cartesian, and Psychoanalytic Ethics. Cambridge University Press.
    Can philosophy enable us to lead better lives through a systematic understanding of our human nature? John Cottingham's thought-provoking study examines three major philosophical approaches to this problem. Starting with the attempts of Classical philosophers to cope with the recalcitrant forces of the passions, he moves on to examine the moral psychology of Descartes, and concludes by analyzing the insights of modern psychoanalytic theory into the human predicament. His study provides a fresh and challenging perspective on moral philosophy and psychology (...)
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  42. Roger Crisp (ed.) (1996). How Should One Live?: Essays on the Virtues. Oxford University Press.
    The last few years have seen a remarkable revival of interest in the virtues, which have regained their central role in moral philosophy. This thought-provoking new collection is a much-needed survey of virtue ethics and virtue theory. The specially commissioned articles by an international team of philosophers represent the state of the art in this subject and will set the agenda for future work in the area. The contributors--including Lawrence Blum, John Cottingham, Julia Driver, Rosalind Hursthouse, Terence Irwin, Susan Moller (...)
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  43. Garrett Cullity (1995). Moral Character and the Iteration Problem. Utilitas 7 (02):289-.
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  44. Vincenzo Cuomo (ed.) (2011). Carattere E Stile. Aracne.
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  45. Hugh Mercer Curtler (2009). Provoking Thought. Fap Books/Florida Academic Press.
    Reading good books -- After virtue, what? -- All's fair in war and politics -- Captain relative, be gone! -- Dumbing down the kids -- What became of God? -- The philosopher meets John Madden -- What's on TV tonight? -- Flotsam and Jetsam.
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  46. Meir Dan-Cohen (2006). Comments. Morality and the Logic of Caring / Christine M. Korsgaard ; a Thoughtful and Reasonable Stability / Michael E. Bratman ; Socializing Harry. [REVIEW] In Harry G. Frankfurt (ed.), Taking Ourselves Seriously & Getting It Right. Stanford University Press.
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  47. J. Dancy (ed.) (1997). Reading Parfit. Blackwell.
  48. Julia Driver (2001). Uneasy Virtue. Cambridge University Press.
    The predominant view of moral virtue can be traced back to Aristotle. He believed that moral virtue must involve intellectual excellence. To have moral virtue one must have practical wisdom - the ability to deliberate well and to see what is morally relevant in a given context. Julia Driver challenges this classical theory of virtue, arguing that it fails to take into account virtues which do seem to involve ignorance or epistemic defect. Some 'virtues of ignorance' are counterexamples to accounts (...)
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  49. Diane Durston (2006). Wabi Sabi: The Art of Everyday Life. Storey Pub..
    With “slow living” as the newest incarnation of the simplicity movement, the search for fresh inspiration on ways to live a more authentic life is as pressing as ever. Turning to Eastern traditions, people are discovering the Japanese concept of wabi sabi. The perfect antidote to today’s frenzied, consumer-oriented culture, wabi sabi encourages slowing down, living modestly, and appreciating the natural and imperfect aspect of material culture. While defying definition, wabi sabi is best expressed in brief, evocative bites. In The (...)
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  50. Didier Fassin (2010). Inequality of Lives, Hierarchies of Humanity : Moral Commitments and Ethical Dilemmas of Humanitarianism. In Ilana Feldman & Miriam Iris Ticktin (eds.), In the Name of Humanity: The Government of Threat and Care. Duke University Press.
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1 — 50 / 1104