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Subcategories:History/traditions: Moral Character
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  1. Robert Merrihew Adams (1988). Common Projects and Moral Virtue. Midwest Studies in Philosophy 13 (1):297-307.
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  2. Arun Agrawal (2010). Environment, Community, Government. In Ilana Feldman & Miriam Iris Ticktin (eds.), In the Name of Humanity: The Government of Threat and Care. Duke University Press
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  3. Kevin A. Aho (2012). Assessing the Role of Virtue Ethics in Psychology: A Commentary on the Work of Blaine Fowers, Frank Richardson, and Brent Slife. Journal of Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology 32 (1):43-49.
    Drawing on the work of Fowers, Richardson, and Slife, this commentary offers an overview and critical assessment of the theory and practice of virtue ethics in psychology. The commentary highlights the importance of a hermeneutic or relational understanding of selfhood and the value of interpreting human meanings within the context of a shared tradition. I conclude with some critical remarks that focus on reconciling the assumptions of naturalism with hermeneutic philosophy, the issue of conservatism in virtue ethics, and problems of (...)
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  4. Chiji Akoma & Sally Scholz (2009). Virtuous Bacchanalia. Clr James Journal 15 (1):206-227.
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  5. Mark Alfano (2016). Michael W. Austin, Ed. Virtues in Action: New Essays in Applied Virtue Ethics. Journal of Value Inquiry 50 (2):457-462.
    This ain’t your grandma’s virtue theory.In Michael Austin’s bold new collection, Virtues in Action: New Essays in Applied Virtue Ethics, gone are the pretentions of defining right action generically as what a virtuous person would do in the circumstances, while acting in and from character, provided that a virtuous person would end up in those circumstances. Instead, we find detailed explorations of specific virtues and vices related to specific fields of activity and problems, with attention (some of it careful – (...)
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  6. Mark Alfano (ed.) (2015). Current Controversies in Virtue. Routledge.
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  7. Susan K. Allard-Nelson (2004). An Aristotelian Approach to Ethical Theory--The Norms of Virtue. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
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  8. Anita L. Allen (2008). The Virtuous Spy. The Monist 91 (1):3-22.
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  9. Gordon W. Allport (1957). Becoming; Basic Considerations for a Psychology of Personality. Journal of Philosophy 54 (16):505-510.
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  10. Roman Altshuler (2016). Character, Will, and Agency. In Jonathan Webber & Alberto Masala (eds.), From Personality to Virtue: Essays on the Philosophy of Character. Oxford University Press 62-80.
    Character and the will are rarely discussed together. At most, philosophers working on the one mention the other in an eliminativist vein—if character is represented as something chosen, for example, it can be chalked up to the work of the will; if the will consists merely of a certain arrangement of mental states, it can be seen as little more than a manifestation of character. This mutual neglect appears perfectly justified. If both character and will are determinants of action, to (...)
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  11. Julian Amaya & Ximena Alvarez (2008). Formation of character and practical reasoning. Eidos: Revista de Filosofía de la Universidad Del Norte 8:10-65.
    This article states that practice and action are more important than intellectual knowledge and contemplation. If this thesis were false, one cannot understand why prudence and the prudent person are the supreme virtue and the model of the good life in Aristotle. The initial question is: how should the rationality of desire be understood, or what does reasoned desire mean? This implies two additional issues: what is the practical syllogism, and what is its relationship to correct reason? How are practical (...)
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  12. Judith Andre (2015). Worldly Virtue: Moral Ideals and Contemporary Life. Lexington Books.
    Worldly Virtue discusses individual virtues in new ways, drawing from faith traditions, feminist analyses, and social science. The book addresses traditional virtues like honesty and generosity and articulates new virtues like those required in aging.
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  13. Chrisoula Andreou (2007). Morality and Psychology. Philosophy Compass 2 (1):46–55.
    This article briefly discusses the connection between moral philosophy and moral psychology, and then explores three intriguing areas of inquiry that fall within the intersection of the two fields. The areas of inquiry considered focus on (1) debates concerning the nature of moral judgments and moral motivation; (2) debates concerning good and bad character traits and character-based explanations of actions; and (3) debates concerning the role of moral rules in guiding the morally wise agent.
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  14. Chrisoula Andreou (2006). Getting On in a Varied World. Social Theory and Practice 32 (1):61-73.
    The core argument in favor of the view that immorality is a natural defect for human beings, which has been developed by Foot, assumes that if justice and compassion have important functions in human survival and reproduction, then injustice and cruelty are natural defects in human beings. But this ignores possibilities and results that cannot reasonably be ignored. Multiple and mixed naturally sound types can and do occur in nature. Moreover, research in the life sciences suggests that at least some (...)
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  15. Julia Annas (2008). The Phenomenology of Virtue. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 7 (1):21-34.
    What is it like to be a good person? I examine and reject suggestions that this will involve having thoughts which have virtue or being a good person as part of their content, as well as suggestions that it might be the presence of feelings distinct from the virtuous person’s thoughts. Is there, then, anything after all to the phenomenology of virtue? I suggest that an answer is to be found in looking to Aristotle’s suggestion that virtuous activity is pleasant (...)
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  16. Julia Annas (2005). Virtue Ethics: What Kind of Naturalism? In Stephen Mark Gardiner (ed.), Virtue Ethics, Old and New. Cornell University Press 11--29.
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  17. Sara Antill (2013). Grit. Powerkids Press.
    Ingredients for success -- What is grit? -- Keep going! -- Setting goals -- Grit on the baseball field -- Finding solutions -- Finding grit in others -- Showing your grit -- Finding a balance -- My report card: grit.
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  18. M. J. Apthorp (1992). Nochmals the Authenticity of Odyssey 10.475–9. Classical Quarterly 42 (01):270-.
    It is gratifying to see the authenticity of Od. 10.475–9 defended anew by the late, Professor Alfred Heubeck; in 1974 I put forward a rather similar defence of the lines myself. However, Heubeck's correct conclusion – that the passage is genuine – stands in startling contrast to some gross exaggerations, in both the Italian and the English versions of his work, about the extent of the manuscript evidence against the passage.
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  19. Vilhjálmur Árnason (1994). Towards Authentic Conversations. Authenticity in the Patient-Professional Relationship. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 15 (3).
    The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the significance of the existential notion of authenticity for medical ethics. This is done by analyzing authenticity and examining its implications for the patient-professional relationship and for ethical decision-making in medical situations. It is argued that while authenticity implies important demand for individual responsibility, which has therapeutic significance, it perpetuates ideas which are antithetical both to authentic interaction between patients and professionals and to fruitful deliberation of moral dilemmas. In order to counteract (...)
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  20. R. Arnheim (2000). The Virtue of Endlessness. British Journal of Aesthetics 40 (2):225-227.
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  21. Nomy Arpaly (2011). Open-Mindedness as a Moral Virtue. American Philosophical Quarterly 48 (1):75.
    Open-mindedness appears to be a cognitive disposition: an open-minded person is disposed to gain, lose, and revise beliefs in a particular, reasonable way. It is also a moral virtue, for we blame, for example, the man who quickly comes to think a new neighbor untrustworthy because he drives the wrong car or wears the wrong clothes—for his closed-mindedness. How open–mindedness could be a moral virtue is a puzzle, though, because exercises of moral virtues are expressions of moral concern, whereas gaining, (...)
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  22. Nomy Arpaly (2004). Unprincipled Virtue. Journal of Ethics 8 (2):201-204.
    Nomy Arpaly rejects the model of rationality used by most ethicists and action theorists. Both observation and psychology indicate that people act rationally without deliberation, and act irrationally with deliberation. By questioning the notion that our own minds are comprehensible to us--and therefore questioning much of the current work of action theorists and ethicists--Arpaly attempts to develop a more realistic conception of moral agency.
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  23. Nomy Arpaly (1998). In Defense of Deep Virtue Ethics. Dissertation, Stanford University
    In this dissertation, I defend two main claims: the moral worth of actions depends on the agent's overall character rather than merely on the agent's concern for morality; and for an action to have moral worth it is not necessary for the agent to perform it out of concern for morality. My defense of both claims greatly relies on intuitions we have about people who do the right thing despite the fact that their moral beliefs, and hence their concern for (...)
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  24. J. Arthur, T. Harrison, D. Carr, K. Kristjánsson, I. Davidson, D. Hayes & J. Higgins, Knightly Virtues : Enhancing Virtue Literacy Through Stories : Research Report.
    There is a growing consensus in Britain on the importance of character, and on the belief that the virtues that contribute to good character are part of the solution to many of the challenges facing modern society. Parents, teachers and schools understand the need to teach basic moral virtues to pupils, such as honesty, self-control, fairness, and respect, while fostering behaviour associated with such virtues today. However, until recently, the materials required to help deliver this ambition have been missing in (...)
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  25. James Arthur, Kristján Kristjánsson, Hywel Thomas, Michael Holdsworth, Luca Badini Confalonieri & Tian Qiu, Virtuous Character for the Practice of Law : Research Report.
    The Jubilee Centre’s new report, Virtuous Character for the Practice of Law, sets about trying to examine the place of character and values in the legal profession in Britain. The report draws its findings from a UK focused survey of 966 lawyers and aspiring lawyers at varying stages of their careers. It is one of the largest pieces of research carried out in Britain focusing on issues of character and virtue within a specific industry sector.
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  26. Shalom Arush (2010). The Garden of Riches: A Practical Guide to Financial Success. Chut Shel Chessed.
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  27. Shalom Arush (2007). Sefer Be-Gan Ha-Osher: Madrikh Maʻaśi la-ʻashir Ha-Amiti. Mosdot "Ḥuṭ Shel Ḥesed".
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  28. Stephen T. Asma (2012). Against Fairness. The University of Chicago Press.
    Even Jesus had a favorite -- Saints and favorites -- Fairness, tribes, and nephews -- Classic cases of favoritism -- To thy own tribe be true: biological favoritism -- Moral gravity -- The biochemistry of favoritism -- Humans are wired for favoritism -- A healthy addiction -- Flexible favoritism -- Kin selection -- Rational or emotional motives -- Conflicting brain systems -- Facts and values -- In praise of exceptions -- Building the grid of impartiality -- Going off the grid (...)
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  29. N. Athanassoulis (2002). Review of Michael Slote, Morals From Motives. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2002 (3).
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  30. Margaret Atkins (2007). Vices, Virtues and Consequences: Essays in Moral and Political Philosophy. By Peter Phillips Simpson. Heythrop Journal 48 (4):649–650.
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  31. Adam Auch, Virtuous Argumentation and the Challenges of Hype. Ontario Society for the Study of Argumentation 10: Virtues of Argumentation.
    In this paper, I consider the virtue of proportionality in relation to reasoning in what I call ‘hype contexts’ . I conclude that a virtuous arguer is one that neither accepts nor rejects a claim based on its ubiquity alone, but who evaluates its importance with reference to the social context in which it is made.
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  32. Robert Audi (2014). Faith as Attitude, Trait, and Virtue. In Kevin Timpe & Craig Boyd (eds.), Virtues and Their Vices. Oxford University Press 327.
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  33. Robert Audi (1991). Responsible Action and Virtuous Character. Ethics 101 (2):304-321.
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  34. Mike Austin (ed.) (2013). Virtues in Action: New Essays in Applied Virtue Ethics. Palgrave Macmillan.
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  35. Neera Kapur Badhwar (ed.) (1993). Friendship: A Philosophical Reader. Cornell University Press.
    Introduction: The Nature and Signif1cance of Friendship Neera Kapur Badhwar Philosophers have long recognized that friendship plays a central role in a ...
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  36. Jason Baehr (2010). Epistemic malevolence. Metaphilosophy 41 (1):189-213.
    Abstract: Against the background of a great deal of structural symmetry between intellectual and moral virtue and vice, it is a surprising fact that what is arguably the central or paradigm moral vice—that is, moral malevolence or malevolence proper—has no obvious or well-known counterpart among the intellectual vices. The notion of "epistemic malevolence" makes no appearance on any standard list of intellectual vices; nor is it central to our ordinary ways of thinking about intellectual vice. In this essay, I argue (...)
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  37. Annette C. Baier (2007). Trust, Suffering, and the Aesculapian Virtues. In Rebecca L. Walker & P. J. Ivanhoe (eds.), Working Virtue: Virtue Ethics and Contemporary Moral Problems. Oxford University Press 136--153.
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  38. F. G. Bailey (1993). The Kingdom of Individuals: An Essay on Self-Respect and Social Obligation. Cornell University Press.
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  39. Jennifer Baker (2013). Virtue Ethics and Practical Guidance. Social Philosophy and Policy 30 (1-2):297-313.
    In this essay I argue that contemporary accounts of virtue ought to incorporate methods ancient virtue ethicists used in addressing an audience whose members were interested in improving their behavior. Ancient examples of these methods, I argue, model how to represent practical rationality in ethical arguments. They show us that when we argue for virtue we ought to address common claims, refer to moral reasoning as a stepwise process, and focus on norms when making recommendations. Our own ethical arguments will (...)
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  40. John Balguy (1728). The Foundation of Moral Goodness. Garland Pub..
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  41. Michael Barber (1998). Docility, Virtue of Virtues. International Philosophical Quarterly 38 (2):119-126.
    This article argues for docility as the virtues of all virtues-paradoxically it boasts on behalf of docility for its pre-eminence over all other virtues. To achieve this purpose, the article (1) situates the resurgence of virtue ethics in reference to ethical theory, (2) discusses the place of docility within virtue ethics, (3) examines the role of docility in the transition to ethical theory and within theory in general, and (4) concludes by addressing the paradoxical character of docility's pre-eminence and fending (...)
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  42. Adam Samuel Baron, The Virtue of the Wise: The Relationship Between Wisdom and Morality.
    In this paper, I mean to examine the relationship between wisdom and morality within the basic framework of neo-Aristotelian Virtue Ethics. Roughly speaking, I mean to question whether a ‘wiser’ person is, necessarily, a more ‘moral’ one. In contemporary Virtue Ethics, using the work of Rosalind Hursthouse as something of a standard view, I take her to conceive of a ‘moral’ person and a ‘perfectly virtuous’ person as roughly equivalent, or at least a ‘perfectly virtuous’ person as being a paragon (...)
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  43. Marcia Baron (1985). Varieties of Ethics of Virtue. American Philosophical Quarterly 22 (1):47 - 53.
    This paper distinguishes and evaluates six types of ethics of virtue, Taking the mark of an ethics of virtue to be the denial that it is a necessary condition of perfectly moral personhood that one be governed by a sense of what one morally ought to do. Appealing to charles taylor's notion of strong evaluation, I argue that all such ethics of virtue are inadequate because they fail to leave room for a distinction between valuing and desiring.
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  44. Marcia Wendy Baron (1982). Moral Agency and the Tenability of an Ethics of Virtue. Dissertation, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
    Since Kant, there has been tremendous uneasiness about the role that the sense of duty should play in moral agency. Doubt over the grounding of the moral ought has contributed to the unease, spawning a project to de-Kantianize ethics by ridding it of the moral ought and of the correlative conception of moral agency. ;The theory which emerges after such radical surgery has never been worked out, much less subjected to close scrutiny. My dissertation develops and assesses this de-Kantianized system (...)
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  45. Thomas Basboll (2004). Let He Who is Without Sin Articulate the First Virtue? Philosophy for Business 13.
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  46. Heather Battaly (2010). Epistemic Self-Indulgence. Metaphilosophy 41 (1):214-234.
    I argue in this essay that there is an epistemic analogue of moral self-indulgence. Section 1 analyzes Aristotle's notion of moral temperance, and its corresponding vices of self-indulgence and insensibility. Section 2 uses Aristotle's notion of moral self-indulgence as a model for epistemic self-indulgence. I argue that one is epistemically self-indulgent only if one either : (ESI1) desires, consumes, and enjoys appropriate and inappropriate epistemic objects; or (ESI2) desires, consumes, and enjoys epistemic objects at appropriate and inappropriate times; or (ESI3) (...)
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  47. Heather D. Battaly (ed.) (2010). Virtue and Vice, Moral and Epistemic. Wiley-Blackwell.
    Machine generated contents note: Notes on Contributors -- Introduction: Virtue and Vice: Heather Battaly -- 1. Virtue Ethics and Virtue Epistemology: Roger Crisp -- 2. Exemplarist Virtue Theory: Linda Zagzebski -- 3. Right Act, Virtuous Motive: Thomas Hurka -- 4. Agency Ascriptions in Ethics and Epistemology: Or, Navigating Intersections, Narrow and Broad: Guy Axtell -- 5. Virtues, Social Roles, and Contextualism: Sarah Wright -- 6. Virtue, Emotion, and Attention: Michael S. Brady -- 7. Feeling Without Thinking: Lessons from the Ancients (...)
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  48. Per Bauhn (2003). The Value of Courage. Nordic Academic Press.
    Combining in-depth analysis with strikingly apt examples of the role that courage plays in the life of human beings, this major contribution to moral philosophy argues that courage is necessary to personal achievement as well as to the common good of a civic community. Bauhn insists that courage is necessary for reinforcing people's understanding of themselves as autonomous agents, which is in turn necessary for countering widespread feelings of alienation and depression. He defines courage as the ability to confront fear, (...)
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  49. Anne Margaret Baxley (2014). Virtue, Self-Mastery, and the Autocracy of Practical Reason. In Lara Denis & Oliver Sensen (eds.), Kant’s Lectures on Ethics: A Critical Guide. Cambridge University Press 223-238.
    As analysis of Kant’s account of virtue in the Lectures on Ethics shows that Kant thinks of virtue as a form of moral self-mastery or self-command that represents a model of self-governance he compares to an autocracy. In light of the fact that the very concept of virtue presupposes struggle and conflict, Kant insists that virtue is distinct from holiness and that any ideal of moral perfection that overlooks the fact that morality is always difficult for us fails to provide (...)
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  50. Anne Margaret Baxley (2007). The Price of Virtue. Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 88 (4):403–423.
    Aristotle famously held that there is a crucial difference between the person who merely acts rightly and the person who is wholehearted in what she does. He captures this contrast by insisting on a distinction between continence and full virtue. One way of accounting for the important difference here is to suppose that, for the genuinely virtuous person, the requirements of virtue "silence" competing reasons for action. I argue that the silencing interpretation is not compelling. As Aristotle rightly saw, virtue (...)
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