This category needs an editor. We encourage you to help if you are qualified.
Volunteer, or read more about what this involves.
Related categories
Siblings:
181 found
Search inside:
(import / add options)   Sort by:
1 — 50 / 181
  1. Don Adams (2009). Aquinas and Modern Contractualism. International Journal of Philosophical Studies 17 (4):509 – 530.
    When modern ethical contractualists defend their view against “teleology,” they typically have in mind utilitarian or consequentialist theories according to which valuable states of affairs are to be promoted. But if we look to older teleological theories e.g. that found in the philosophy of St. Thomas Aquinas we will find a kind of teleology that can be incorporated beneficially into contractualist ethics. In this paper I argue that Scanlon would be well served, on grounds to which he appeals, to make (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Robert Merrihew Adams (2001). Scanlon's Contractualism: Critical Notice of T. M. Scanlon, "What We Owe to Each Other". Philosophical Review 110 (4):563-586.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (9 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. David Alm (2008). Contractualism, Reciprocity, Compensation. Journal of Ethics and Social Philosophy 2 (3):1-23.
    Two generally recognized moral duties are to reciprocate benefits one has received from others and to compensate harms one has done to others. In this paper I want to show that it is not possible to give an adequate account of either duty – or at least one that corresponds to our actual practices – within a contractualist moral theory of the type developed by T. M. Scanlon (1982, 1998). This fact is interesting in its own right, as contractualism is (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Richard J. Arneson (2002). The End of Welfare as We Know It? Scanlon Versus Welfarist Consequentialism. Social Theory and Practice 28 (2):315-336.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Elizabeth Ashford, Contractualism. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Elizabeth Ashford (2003). The Demandingness of Scanlon's Contractualism. Ethics 113 (2):273-302.
    One of the reasons why Kantian contractualism has been seen as an appealing alternative to utilitarianism is that it seems to be able to avoid utilitarianism's extreme demandingness, while retaining a fully impartial moral point of view. I argue that in the current state of the world, contractualist obligations to help those in need are not significantly less demanding than utilitarian obligations. I also argue that while a plausible version of utilitarianism would be considerably less demanding if the state of (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Stephen W. Ball (1998). Critical Review of Rawls's Political Liberalism: A Utilitarian and Decision-Theoretical Analysis of the Main Arguments. Utilitas 10 (02):222-.
  8. Stephen W. Ball (1993). Maximin Justice, Sacrifice, and the Reciprocity Argument: A Pragmatic Reassessment of the Rawls/Nozick Debate. Utilitas 5 (02):157-.
    Theories of economic justice are characteristically based on abstract ethical concerns often unrelated to practical distributive results. Two decades ago, Rawls's theory of justice began as a reaction against the alleged ‘sacrifices’ condoned by utilitarian theory. One variant of this objection is that utilitarianism permits gross inequalities, severe deprivations of individual liberty, or even the enslavement of society's least well-off individuals. There are, however, more subtle forms of the objection. In Rawls, it is often waged without any claim that utilitarianism (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. R. Eric Barnes (2012). Contractualism and the Foundations of Morality. [REVIEW] Australasian Journal of Philosophy 90 (4):815-818.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Brian Barry (1996). Contractual Justice: A Modest Defence. Utilitas 8 (03):357-.
    As the author of Justice as Impartiality , I am not ashamed to admit that I was delighted by the liveliness of the discussion generated by it at the meeting on which this symposium is based. I am likewise grateful to the six authors for finding the book worthy of the careful attention that they have bestowed on it. Between them, the symposiasts take up many more points than I can cover in this response. I shall therefore focus on some (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Michele Bocchiola (forthcoming). Nicholas Southwood: Contractualism and the Foundations of Morality. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice:1-3.
    In the contemporary philosophical debate, there are two opposing contractualist views. On the one side, Hobbesian contractualisms take moral principles as side-constraints to redress the failures of the interaction among self-interested individuals. On the other, Kantian versions of the social contract ground morality on an impartial and moralized viewpoint. In his recent Contractualism and the Foundations of Morality, Nicholas Southwood proposes a third and novel form of contractualism, with the aim to overcome the “implausibly personal and partial characterization of the (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Jeffrey Brand‐Ballard (2004). Contractualism and Deontic Restrictions. Ethics 114 (2):269-300.
    In response to the charge that deontic ("argent-centered") restrictions are paradoxical, several recent writers suggest that such restrictions find support within T.M. Scanlon's contractualism. I suggest that this claim is only interesting if these restrictions are stronger than those supported by indirect consequentialism. I argue that contractualism cannot support restrictions any stronger than those supported by indirect consequentialism. The contractualists have mislocated the source of the paradox, which arises under any theory that defines right action in patient-focused terms. Consequentialism and (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. John Charvet (1998). Fundamental Equality. Utilitas 10 (03):337-.
    By fundamental equality is meant the idea of the equal worth of human beings understood as a constitutive principle of morality. The paper is concerned with how this principle may be justified. Attempts to justify it in an objectivist way by citing some quality of human beings in virtue of which they are supposed to be of equal worth are rejected. Such approaches in fact justify inequality to the extent that some people possess the quality to a greater degree than (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. Eugene Chislenko (2007). The Primacy of the Moral: An Interview with Thomas M. Scanlon. The Harvard Review of Philosophy 15 (1):92-101.
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. Michael Cholbi (2002). A Contractualist Account of Promising. Southern Journal of Philosophy 40 (4):475-91.
    T.M. Scanlon (1998) proposes that promise breaking is wrong because it shows manipulative disregard for the expectations for future behavior created by promising. I argue that this account of promissory obligation is mistaken in it own right, as well as being at odds with Scanlon's contractualism. I begin by placing Scanlon's account of promising within a tradition that treats the creation of expectations in promise recipients as central to promissory obligation. However, a counterexample to Scanlon's account, his case of the (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. David Copp & David Sobel (2000). What We Owe to Each Other, T. M. Scanlon, the Belknap Press of Harvard University Press, 1998, IX + 420 Pages. [REVIEW] Economics and Philosophy 16 (2):333-378.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. R. Crisp (2000). SCANLON, TM-What We Owe to Each Other. Philosophical Books 41 (4):235-246.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. Fred D'Agostino, John Thrasher & Gerald Gaus, Contemporary Approaches to the Social Contract. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
  19. Stephen Darwall (2006). Contractualism, Root and Branch: A Review Essay. Philosophy and Public Affairs 34 (2):193–214.
  20. Stephen L. Darwall (ed.) (2003). Contractarianism, Contractualism. Wiley-Blackwell.
    Contractualism/Contractarianism collects, for the first time, both major classical sources and central contemporary discussions of these important approaches to philosophical ethics. Edited and introduced by Stephen Darwall, these readings are essential for anyone interested in normative ethics.
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. Michael Davis (1992). The Moral Legislature: Contractualism Without an Archimedean Point. Ethics 102 (2):303-318.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. Peter de Marneffe (1994). Contractualism, Liberty, and Democracy. Ethics 104 (4):764-783.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. Aleksandar Dobrijevic (2011). Contractualism Vs. Contractarianism. Filozofija I Društvo 22 (3):27-44.
    The author insists that, within contemporary theory, common division of social contract tradition on “Hobbesian” and “Kantian” line of thought is entirely justified. Analyzing the theories of David Gauthier and Thomas Scanlon, he also indicates the important difference between “moral” and “political” dimension of the idea of social contract. Finally, he rejects recent attempts of identifying contractualism with constructivism.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. Mathieu Doucet (2013). Playing Dice with Morality: Weighted Lotteries and the Number Problem. Utilitas 25 (2):161-181.
    In this article I criticize the non-consequentialist Weighted Lottery (WL) solution to the choice between saving a smaller or a larger group of people. WL aims to avoid what non-consequentialists see as consequentialism's unfair aggregation by giving equal consideration to each individual's claim to be rescued. In so doing, I argue, WL runs into another common objection to consequentialism: it is excessively demanding. WL links the right action with the outcome of a fairly weighted lottery, which means that an agent (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. Gerald Dworkin (2002). Contractualism and the Normativity of Principles. Ethics 112 (3):471-482.
    This is a study of the question of whether moral principles, as justified by a contractualist scheme, such as Scanlon's, are binding on persons, i.e., give them reasons to act in accordance with such principles. I argue that for those agents who meet the motivational conditions that Scanlon lays down, i.e., those who seek to reach agreement with others on principles that are not rejectable, such principles are binding. But on those who do not meet the motivational condition the principles (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. Fred D’Agostino (forthcoming). Contractualism, Contemporary Approaches. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  27. David M. Estlund (2003). The Democracy/Contractualism Analogy. Philosophy and Public Affairs 31 (4):387–412.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (9 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. Brian Feltham (2005). Scanlon and Contractualism. Contemporary Political Theory 4 (2):209.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  29. Harry G. Frankfurt (2002). Reply to TM Scanlon. In Sarah Buss & Lee Overton (eds.), Contours of Agency: Essays on Themes From Harry Frankfurt. Mit Press, Bradford Books. 184--188.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  30. Samuel Freeman (1991). Contractualism, Moral Motivation, and Practical Reason. Journal of Philosophy 88 (6):281-303.
    A discussion of T M Scanlon's contractualism as a foundational account of the nature of morality. The article discusses how contractualism provides an account of moral truth and objectivity that is based in an idealization of moral reasoning. It then develops contractualism's account of moral motivation to show how it provides a way to understand obscure but central aspects of Kantian views: the claims that moral reasons are of a special kind, and that moral motives have a basis in practical (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  31. Samuel Freeman (1990). Reason and Agreement in Social Contract Views. Philosophy and Public Affairs 19 (2):122-157.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  32. Samuel Richard Freeman (2007). Justice and the Social Contract: Essays on Rawlsian Political Philosophy. Oxford University Press.
    John Rawls (1921-2002) was one of the 20th century's most important philosophers and continues to be among the most widely discussed of contemporary thinkers. His work, particularly A Theory of Justice, is integral to discussions of social and international justice, democracy, liberalism, welfare economics, and constitutional law, in departments of philosophy, politics, economics, law, public policy, and others. Samuel Freeman is one of Rawls's foremost interpreters. This volume contains nine of his essays on Rawls and Rawlsian justice, two of which (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  33. Tamra Frei (2009). The Redundancy Objection, and Why Scanlon is Not a Contractualist. Journal of Political Philosophy 17 (1):47-65.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  34. Barbara H. Fried (2012). Can Contractualism Save Us From Aggregation? Journal of Ethics 16 (1):39-66.
    This paper examines the efforts of contractualists to develop an alternative to aggregation to govern our duty not to harm (duty to rescue) others. I conclude that many of the moral principles articulated in the literature seem to reduce to aggregation by a different name. Those that do not are viable only as long as they are limited to a handful of oddball cases at the margins of social life. If extended to run-of-the-mill conduct that accounts for virtually all unintended (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  35. Robert Garner (2012). Much Ado About Nothing?: Barry, Justice and Animals. Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 15 (3):363-376.
    This article examines the extent to which Brian Barry?s contractarian political theory ? justice as impartiality ? is able to incorporate the interests of animals. Despite the initial optimism that Barry might provide a theory of justice that can provide substantial protection for the interests of animals, it is clear that he offers relatively little. Insofar as animals can be protected within justice as impartiality, they are not being protected as a result of their intrinsic value, but merely as one, (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  36. Gerald Gaus (2012). Justification, Choice and Promise: Three Devices of the Consent Tradition in a Diverse Society. Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 15 (2):109-127.
    The twin ideas at the heart of the social contract tradition are that persons are naturally free and equal, and that genuine political obligations must in some way be based on the consent of those obligated. The Lockean tradition has held that consent must be in the form of explicit choice; Kantian contractualism has insisted on consent as rational endorsement. In this paper I seek to bring the Kantian and Lockean contract traditions together. Kantian rational justification and actual choice are (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  37. David P. Gauthier (2006). Rousseau: The Sentiment of Existence. Cambridge University Press.
    The distinguished philosopher David Gauthier examines Rousseau's evolving notion of freedom, particularly in his later works, where he focuses on a single quest: Can freedom and the independent self be regained? Rousseau's first answer is given in Emile, where he seeks to create a self-sufficient individual, neither materially nor psychologically enslaved to others. His second answer comes in the Social Contract, where he seeks to create a citizen who identifies totally with his community, so that he experiences his dependence on (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  38. M. Gibb (2014). The Honor Code: How Moral Revolutions Happen, Contractualism and the Foundations of Morality, Partiality. Philosophical Quarterly 64 (254):174-179.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  39. Allan Gibbard (2008). Reconciling Our Aims: In Search of Bases for Ethics. Oxford University Press.
    In these three Tanner lectures, distinguished ethical theorist Allan Gibbard explores the nature of normative thought and the bases of ethics. In the first lecture he explores the role of intuitions in moral thinking and offers a way of thinking about the intuitive method of moral inquiry that both places this activity within the natural world and makes sense of it as an indispensable part of our lives as planners. In the second and third lectures he takes up the kind (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  40. Pablo Gilabert (2010). Kant and the Claims of the Poor. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 81 (2):382-418.
  41. Pablo Gilabert (2007). Contractualism and Poverty Relief. Social Theory and Practice 33 (2):277-310.
  42. Pablo Gilabert (2006). Global Justice, Democracy and Solidarity. Res Publica 12 (4):435-443.
  43. A. H. Goldman (2012). Contractualism and the Foundations of Morality, by Nicholas Southwood. Mind 121 (482):539-543.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  44. Joseph M. Grcic, Rawls and Rousseau on the Social Contract.
  45. Johan E. Gustafsson (forthcoming). Sequential Dominance and the Anti-Aggregation Principle. Philosophical Studies:1-9.
    According to the widely held anti-aggregation principle, it is wrong to save a larger number of people from minor harms rather than a smaller number from much more serious harms. This principle is a central part of many influential and anti-utilitarian ethical theories. According to the sequential-dominance principle, one does something wrong if one knowingly performs a sequence of acts whose outcome would be worse for everyone than the outcome of an alternative sequence of acts. The intuitive appeal of the (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  46. Everett W. Hall (1957). II. Justice as Fairness: A Modernized Version of the Social Contract. Journal of Philosophy 54 (22):662-670.
  47. Jean Hampton (1980). Contracts and Choices: Does Rawls Have a Social Contract Theory? Journal of Philosophy 77 (6):315-338.
  48. Christie Hartley (2009). An Inclusive Contractualism: Obligations to the Mentally Disabled. In Kimberley Brownlee & Adam Cureton (eds.), Disability and Disadvantage. Oxford University Press. 138--61.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  49. Carl G. Hedman (1987). Making the Social Contract Relevant. Social Theory and Practice 13 (3):327-360.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  50. Pamela Hieronymi (2011). Of Metaethics and Motivation: The Appeal of Contractualism. In R. Jay Wallace, Rahul Kumar & Samuel Richard Freeman (eds.), Reasons and Recognition: Essays on the Philosophy of T. M. Scanlon. Oxford University Press.
    In 1982, when T. M. Scanlon published “Contractualism and Utilitarianism,” he noted that, despite the widespread attention to Rawls’ A Theory of Justice, the appeal of contractualism as a moral theory had been under appreciated. In particular, the appeal of contractualism’s account of what he then called “moral motivation” had been under appreciated.1 It seems to me that, in the intervening quarter century, despite the widespread discussion of Scanlon’s work, the appeal of contractualism, in precisely this regard, has still been (...)
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
1 — 50 / 181