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  1. Chris Armstrong (2009). Global Egalitarianism. Philosophy Compass 4 (1):155-171.
    To whom is egalitarian justice owed? Our fellow citizens, or all of humankind? If the latter, what form might a global brand of egalitarianism take? This paper examines some recent debates about the justification, and content, of global egalitarian justice. It provides an account of some keenly argued controversies about the scope of egalitarian justice, between those who would restrict it to the level of the state and those who would extend it more widely. It also notes the cross-cutting distinction (...)
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  2. Christian Barry & Gerhard Øverland (2012). The Feasible Alternatives Thesis: Kicking Away the Livelihoods of the Global Poor. Politics, Philosophy and Economics 11 (1):97-119.
    Many assert that affluent countries have contributed in the past to poverty in developing countries through wars of aggression and conquest, colonialism and its legacies, the imposition of puppet leaders, and support for brutal dictators and venal elites. Thomas Pogge has recently argued that there is an additional and, arguably, even more consequential way in which the affluent continue to contribute to poverty in the developing world. He argues that when people cooperate in instituting and upholding institutional arrangements that foreseeably (...)
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  3. Gillian Brock (2009). Global Justice. Oxford University Press.
    OUP writes: Gillian Brock develops a viable cosmopolitan model of global justice that takes seriously the equal moral worth of persons, yet leaves scope for defensible forms of nationalism and for other legitimate identifications and affiliations people have. Brock addresses two prominent kinds of skeptic about global justice: those who doubt its feasibility and those who believe that cosmopolitanism interferes illegitimately with the defensible scope of nationalism by undermining goods of national importance, such as authentic democracy or national self-determination. The (...)
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  4. Thom Brooks (2011). Rethinking Remedial Responsibilities. Ethics and Global Politics 4 (3).
    How should we determine which nations have a responsibility to remedy suffering elsewhere? The problem is pressing because, following David Miller, ‘[it] is morally intolerable if (remediable) suffering and deprivation are allowed to continue . . . where they exist we are morally bound to hold somebody (some person or collective agent) responsible for relieving them’. Miller offers a connection theory of remedial responsibilities in response to this problem, a theory he has been developing over the last decade. This theory (...)
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  5. Simon Caney (2011). Humanity, Associations and Global Justice: A Defence of Humanity-Centred Cosmopolitan Egalitarianism. The Monist 94 (4):506-534.
    This paper defends an egalitarian conception of global justice against two kinds of criticism. Many who defend egalitarian principles of justice do so on the basis that all humans are part of a common 'association' of some kind. In this paper I defend the humanity-centred approach which holds that persons should be included within the scope of distributive justice simply because they are fellow human beings. The paper has four substantive sections - the first addresses Andrea Sangiovanni's reciprocity-based argument for (...)
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  6. Simon Caney (2005). Cosmopolitanism, Democracy and Distributive Justice. Canadian Journal of Philosophy (sup1):29-63.
  7. Ada S. Jaarsma (2010). Habermas' Kierkegaard and the Nature of the Secular. Constellations 17 (2):271-292.
  8. Charles Jones (2010). Human Rights and Moral Cosmopolitanism. Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 13 (1):115-135.
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  9. Pauline Kleingeld (2003). Kant’s Cosmopolitan Patriotism. Kant-Studien 94 (3):299-316.
    Patriotism and cosmopolitanism are often presumed to be mutually exclusive, but Immanuel Kant defends both. Although he is best known for his moral and political cosmopolitanism, in several texts he defends the claim that we have a duty of patriotism, claiming that cosmopolitans ought to be patriotic. In this paper, I examine Kant’s different accounts of the duty of patriotism. I argue that Kant’s defense of nationalist patriotism fails, but that his argument for a duty of civic patriotism succeeds.
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  10. Holly Lawford-Smith (2012). The Motivation Question: Arguments From Justice, and From Humanity. British Journal of Political Science 42:661-678.
    There are many interesting questions to ask about cosmopolitan arguments. Is it true that the sphere of moral concern is global? Which sets of actions would realize the outcomes of global justice that cosmopolitans seek? Are those sets of actions feasible, and when we compare them against each other, which is the most feasible? The question I want to focus on in this paper is a question of the latter kind, but I want to take a slightly unique approach to (...)
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  11. Holly Lawford-Smith (2011). Cosmopolitan Global Justice: Brock Vs. The Feasibility Sceptic. Global Justice Theory Practice Rhetoric (4).
  12. Gabriel Palmer-Fernández (2009). Public Policy : Moving Toward Moral Cosmopolitanism. In John-Stewart Gordon (ed.), Morality and Justice: Reading Boylan's a Just Society. Lexington Books.
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  13. Roland Pierik (2004). Thomas Pogge: World Poverty and Human Rights: Cosmopolitan Responsibilities and Reforms. [REVIEW] The Leiden Journal of International Law 17 (3):631-635.
  14. David A. Reidy (2010). Human Rights and Liberal Toleration. Canadian Journal of Law and Jurisprudence 23 (2):287-317.
    Offers, by way of systematic reconstruction of Rawls's Law of Peoples, a principled view of human rights and liberal toleration.
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  15. David A. Reidy (2008). Human Rights: Institutions and Agendas. Public Affairs Quarterly 22 (4):409-433.
    Distinguishes and shows how one can coherently affirm distinct human rights agendas rooted in distinct conceptions of human rights, each with its own normative aim and institutional and discursive field of application.
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  16. Leif Wenar, Why Rawls is Not a Cosmopolitan Egalitarian.
    In John Rawls’s The Law of Peoples we find unfamiliar concepts, surprising pronouncements, and what appear from a familiar Rawlsian perspective to be elementary errors in reasoning.1 Even Rawls’s most sensitive and sympathetic interpreters have registered unusually deep misgivings about the book.2 Most perplexing of all is the general character of the view that Rawls sets out to justify. For in this book Rawls, the twentieth century’s leading liberal egalitarian, advances a theory which shows no direct concern for individuals and (...)
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