This category needs an editor. We encourage you to help if you are qualified.
Volunteer, or read more about what this involves.
Related categories
Subcategories:
354 found
Search inside:
(import / add options)   Sort by:
1 — 50 / 354
Material to categorize
  1. Elizabeth Anderson (2008). Emotions in Kant's Later Moral Philosophy: Honour and the Phenomenology of Moral Value. In Monika Betzler (ed.), Kant's Ethics of Virtues. Walter De Gruyter.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Maria Antonaccio (2001). Picturing the Soul: Moral Psychology and the Recovery of the Emotions. [REVIEW] Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 4 (2):127-141.
    This paper draws from the resources of Iris Murdoch''s moral philosophy to analyze the ethical status of the emotions at two related levels of reflection. Methodologically, it argues that a recovery of the emotions requires a revised notion of moral theory which affirms the basic orientation of consciousness to some notion of value or the good. Such a theory challenges many of the rationalist premises which in the past have led moral theory to reject the role of emotions in ethics. (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. David Armstrong (2008). Be Angry and Sin Not" : Philodemus Versus the Stoics on Natural Bites and Natural Emotions. In John T. Fitzgerald (ed.), Passions and Moral Progress in Greco-Roman Thought. Routledge. 79--121.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Filippo Aureli & Colleen M. Schaffner (2001). Empathy as a Special Case of Emotional Mediation of Social Behavior. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 25 (1):23-24.
    Empathy can be viewed as an intervening variable to explain complex webs of causation between multiple factors and the resulting responses. The mediating role of emotion, implicit in the concept of an intervening variable, can be at the basis of the flexibility of empathic responses. Knowledge of the underlying neurophysiological mechanisms is needed for empathy to be considered as a biologically functional intervening variable.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Macalester Bell (2005). A Woman's Scorn: Toward a Feminist Defense of Contempt as a Moral Emotion. Hypatia 20 (4):80-93.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (14 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. A. Ben-ze'ev (1992). Emotional and Moral Evaluations. Metaphilosophy 23 (3):214-29.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Aaron Ben-Ze'ev (1997). Emotions and Morality. Journal of Value Inquiry 31 (2):195-212.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Knut Berner (2001). Local Anaesthesia, the Increase of the Evil Through Emotional Impoverishment. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 4 (2):161-169.
    Evil should be characterised as a specific constellation, which results from destructive connections between individual activities and systemic influences. The article shows some important aspects of the structure of evil and prefers the terms of wickedness and obscene coincidences to describe its own character. Therefore, also the division between rationality and affectivity appears as inadequate, because evil has on the one side an intrinsic attractiveness for individuals and is on the other side in modern societies more and more a product (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Richard Bett (2008). The Stoic Life: Emotions, Duties, and Fate. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 76 (2):504–506.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Richard Bett (2002). Review: Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation. [REVIEW] Mind 111 (443):714-718.
  11. Douglas Birkhead (1997). Book Review: The Role of Emotions in Moral Decisions: A Book Review by Douglas Birkhead. [REVIEW] Journal of Mass Media Ethics 12 (1):57 – 59.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Augusto Blasi (1999). Emotions and Moral Motivation. Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 29 (1):1–19.
    One question in moral psychology concerns the role of emotions to motivate moral action. This question has recently become more urgent, because it is now clearer that cognitive developmental theories cannot offer a complete explanation of moral functioning. This paper suggests that emotion, as is typically understood in psychology, cannot be seen as the basis for an acceptable explanation of moral behaviour and motivation. However, it is argued that it is possible to understand emotions as embedded in agentic processes, and (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. John Bolender (2003). The Genealogy of the Moral Modules. Minds and Machines 13 (2):233-255.
    This paper defends a cognitive theory of those emotional reactions which motivate and constrain moral judgment. On this theory, moral emotions result from mental faculties specialized for automatically producing feelings of approval or disapproval in response to mental representations of various social situations and actions. These faculties are modules in Fodor's sense, since they are informationally encapsulated, specialized, and contain innate information about social situations. The paper also tries to shed light on which moral modules there are, which of these (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (12 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. Michael S. Brady (2010). Virtue, Emotion, and Attention. Metaphilosophy 41 (1):115-131.
    The perceptual model of emotions maintains that emotions involve, or are at least analogous to, perceptions of value. On this account, emotions purport to tell us about the evaluative realm, in much the same way that sensory perceptions inform us about the sensible world. An important development of this position, prominent in recent work by Peter Goldie amongst others, concerns the essential role that virtuous habits of attention play in enabling us to gain perceptual and evaluative knowledge. I think that (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. Tad Brennan (2005). The Stoic Life: Emotions, Duties, and Fate. Oxford University Press.
    Tad Brennan explains how to live the Stoic life--and why we might want to. Stoicism has been one of the main currents of thought in Western civilization for two thousand years: Brennan offers a fascinating guide through the ethical ideas of the original Stoic philosophers, and shows how valuable these ideas remain today, both intellectually and in practice. He writes in a lively informal style which will bring Stoicism to life for readers who are new to ancient philosophy. The Stoic (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. Rupert Brown, Jesse Allpress, Roger Giner Sorolla, Julien Deonna & Fabrice Teroni (2014). Two Faces of Shame: Moral Shame and Image Shame Differently Predict Positive and Negative Responses to Ingroup Wrongdoing. Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin 40 (10):1270-1284.
    This article proposes distinctions between guilt and two forms of shame: Guilt arises from a violated norm and is characterized by a focus on specific behavior; shame can be characterized by a threatened social image (Image Shame) or a threatened moral essence (Moral Shame). Applying this analysis to group-based emotions, three correlational studies are reported, set in the context of atrocities committed by (British) ingroup members during the Iraq war (Ns = 147, 256, 399). Results showed that the two forms (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. Garry Bryant (1987). Ten-Fifty P. I.: Emotion and the Photographer's Role. Journal of Mass Media Ethics 2 (2):32 – 39.
    The emotional traumas news photographers experience are not often discussed outside the newsroom. Here professional newspaper photographer Garry Bryant offers a personal testimonial on the effects his job has had on him, as well as on the public. The excitement and drama of shooting spot news at accidents and disasters have caused a certain dulling of the senses, but on the other hand have heightened Bryant's awareness of the importance of his work. A variety of Bryant's favorite photos illustrate this (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. Sylvia Burrow (2009). Bodily Limits to Autonomy : Emotion, Attitude, and Self-Defense. In Sue Campbell, Letitia Meynell & Susan Sherwin (eds.), Embodiment and Agency. Pennsylvania State University Press.
    My aim is to show that the development of self-defense skills functions as a means of overcoming bodily encoded limits to autonomy. Through this discussion, I hope to broaden our understanding of the embodied nature of autonomy by illuminating the connection between bodily training and responses such as self-confidence, self-trust, and self-esteem. My paper aims toward these goals in two steps. First, it shows that self-defense training is valuable for women because it provides a security that one can avoid or (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. Brian E. Butler (2002). The Necessity of Understanding Thumos, and the Misuse of Emotion in Modern Political Theory, The Review of Communication, Vol. The Review of Communication 2 (2).
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. David Carr (2009). Virtue, Mixed Emotions and Moral Ambivalence. Philosophy 84 (1):31-46.
    Aristotelian virtue ethics invests emotions and feelings with much moral significance. However, the moral and other conflicts that inevitably beset human life often give rise to states of emotional division and ambivalence with problematic implications for any understanding of virtue as complete psychic unity of character and conduct. For one thing, any admission that the virtuous are prey to conflicting passions and desires may seem to threaten the crucial virtue ethical distinction between the virtuous and the continent. One recent attempt (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. David Carr (2002). Feelings in Moral Conflict and the Hazards of Emotional Intelligence. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 5 (1):3-21.
    From some perspectives, it seems obvious that emotions and feelings must be both reasonable and morally significant: from others, it may seem as obvious that they cannot be. This paper seeks to advance discussion of ethical implications of the currently contested issue of the relationship of reason to feeling and emotion via reflection upon various examples of affectively charged moral dilemma. This discussion also proceeds by way of critical consideration of recent empirical enquiry into these issues in the literature of (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. Noël Carroll (2010). Movies, the Moral Emotions, and Sympathy. Midwest Studies in Philosophy 34 (1):1-19.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. David Cartwright (1987). Kant's View of the Moral Significance of Kindhearted Emotions and the Moral Insignificance of Kant's View. Journal of Value Inquiry 21 (4):291-304.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. Chrystine E. Cassin (1968). Emotions and Evaluations. Personalist 49:563-571.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. William Charlton (2008). Emotional Life in Three Dimensions. Journal of Applied Philosophy 25 (4):291-300.
    abstract I first summarise Martha Nussbaum's theory of emotion and place it against its historical background. Borrowing distinctions from Plato I then argue that the emotions discussed in Hiding From Humanity affect us primarily as social beings, not as individuals, and suggest modifying and educating them by social means.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. Christine Clavien & Rebekka A. Klein (2010). Eager for Fairness or for Revenge? Psychological Altruism in Economics. Economics and Philosophy 26 (03):267-290.
    To understand the human capacity for psychological altruism, one requires a proper understanding of how people actually think and feel. This paper addresses the possible relevance of recent findings in experimental economics and neuroeconomics to the philosophical controversy over altruism and egoism. After briefly sketching and contextualizing the controversy, we survey and discuss the results of various studies on behaviourally altruistic helping and punishing behaviour, which provide stimulating clues for the debate over psychological altruism. On closer analysis, these studies prove (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  27. Mark Coeckelbergh (2010). Moral Appearances: Emotions, Robots, and Human Morality. [REVIEW] Ethics and Information Technology 12 (3):235-241.
    Can we build ‘moral robots’? If morality depends on emotions, the answer seems negative. Current robots do not meet standard necessary conditions for having emotions: they lack consciousness, mental states, and feelings. Moreover, it is not even clear how we might ever establish whether robots satisfy these conditions. Thus, at most, robots could be programmed to follow rules, but it would seem that such ‘psychopathic’ robots would be dangerous since they would lack full moral agency. However, I will argue that (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (10 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. Patrick Coleman (2011). Anger, Gratitude, and the Enlightenment Writer. OUP Oxford.
    Anger, Gratitude, and the Enlightenment Writer examines how writers as diverse as Rousseau, Diderot, Marivaux, and Challe discuss the social appropriateness of anger and gratitude in regulating social life. Emotions are social transactions, with rules identifying when and where it is appropriate to express one's feelings and, especially in the case of anger and gratitude, who is allowed or expected to put them on display. Defining the kinds of slight or favor that demand an angry or a grateful response became (...)
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  29. Giovanna Colombetti & Steve Torrance (2009). Emotion and Ethics: An Inter-(En)Active Approach. [REVIEW] Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 8 (4):505-526.
    In this paper, we start exploring the affective and ethical dimension of what De Jaegher and Di Paolo (Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences, 6:485–507, 2007 ) have called ‘participatory sense-making’. In the first part, we distinguish various ways in which we are, and feel, affectively inter-connected in interpersonal encounters. In the second part, we discuss the ethical character of this affective inter-connectedness, as well as the implications that taking an ‘inter-(en)active approach’ has for ethical theory itself.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  30. Shane Connelly, Whitney Helton-Fauth & Michael D. Mumford (2004). A Managerial in-Basket Study of the Impact of Trait Emotions on Ethical Choice. Journal of Business Ethics 51 (3):245-267.
    This paper explores the relationship of various trait emotions to the ethical choices of 189 college students who completed a managerial decision-making task as part of an in-basket exercise in a laboratory setting. Prior research regarding emotion influences on ethical decision-making and linkages between emotions and cognition informed hypotheses about how different types of emotions impact ethical choices. Findings supported our expectations that positive and negative emotions classified as active would be more strongly related to interpersonally-directed ethical choices than to (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  31. John M. Cooper (2005). The Emotional Life of the Wise. Southern Journal of Philosophy 43 (S1):176-218.
    The ancient Stoics notoriously argued, with thoroughness and force, that all ordinary “emotions” (passions, mental affections: in Greek, pãyh) are thoroughly bad states of mind, not to be indulged in by anyone, under any circumstances: anger, resentment, gloating; pity, sympathy, grief; delight, glee, pleasure; impassioned love (i.e. ¶rvw), agitated desires of any kind, fear; disappointment, regret, all sorts of sorrow; hatred, contempt, schadenfreude. Early on in the history of Stoicism, however, apparently in order to avoid the objection that human nature (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  32. Amy Coplan (2010). Feeling Without Thinking: Lessons From the Ancients on Emotion and Virtue-Acquisition. Metaphilosophy 41 (1):132-151.
    By briefly sketching some important ancient accounts of the connections between psychology and moral education, I hope to illuminate the significance of the contemporary debate on the nature of emotion and to reveal its stakes. I begin the essay with a brief discussion of intellectualism in Socrates and the Stoics, and Plato's and Posidonius's respective attacks against it. Next, I examine the two current leading philosophical accounts of emotion: the cognitive theory and the noncognitive theory. I maintain that the noncognitive (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  33. Justin D'arms (2004). Bennett Helm, Emotional Reason: Deliberation, Motivation, and the Nature of Value (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2001), Pp. X + 261. Utilitas 16 (3):343-345.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  34. Justin D'Arms & Daniel Jacobson (2000). The Moralistic Fallacy: On the "Appropriateness" of Emotions. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 61 (1):65-90.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  35. Justin D'Arms & Daniel Jacobson (1994). Expressivism, Morality, and the Emotions. Ethics 104 (4):739-763.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  36. John Deigh (1998). Valuing Emotions. Philosophical Review 107 (4):617-620.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  37. Julien Deonna, Fabrice Teroni & Raffaele Rodogno (2011). In Defense of Shame. Oxford University Press.
    Is shame social? Is it superficial? Is it a morally problematic emotion? Researchers in disciplines as different as psychology, philosophy, and anthropology have thought so. But what is the nature of shame and why are claims regarding its social nature and moral standing interesting and important? Do they tell us anything worthwhile about the value of shame and its potential legal and political applications? -/- In this book, Julien Deonna, Raffaele Rodogno, and Fabrice Teroni propose an original philosophical account of (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  38. Satish P. Deshpande & Jacob Joseph (2009). Impact of Emotional Intelligence, Ethical Climate, and Behavior of Peers on Ethical Behavior of Nurses. Journal of Business Ethics 85 (3):403 - 410.
    This study examines factors impacting ethical behavior of 103 hospital nurses. The level of emotional intelligence and ethical behavior of peers had a significant impact on ethical behavior of nurses. Independence climate had a significant impact on ethical behavior of nurses. Other ethical climate types such as professional, caring, rules, instrumental, and efficiency did not impact ethical behavior of respondents. Implications of this study for researchers and practitioners are discussed.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  39. Robin S. Dillon (1997). Self-Respect: Moral, Emotional, Political. Ethics 107 (2):226-249.
  40. Joseph A. Diorio (1984). Do Altruistic Emotions Have Intrinsic Value? Journal of Value Inquiry 18 (1):57-61.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  41. W. Scott Dunbar (2005). Emotional Engagement in Professional Ethics. Science and Engineering Ethics 11 (4):535-551.
    Recent results from two different studies show evidence of strong emotional engagement in moral dilemmas that require personal involvement or ethical problems that involve significant inter-personal issues. This empirical evidence for a connection between emotional engagement and moral or ethical choices is interesting because it is related to a fundamental survival mechanism rooted in human evolution. The results lead one to question when and how emotional engagement might occur in a professional ethical situation. However, the studies employed static dilemmas or (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  42. Francis Dunlop (1984). The Education of the Emotions. Journal of Philosophy of Education 18 (2):245–255.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  43. Arthur J. Dyck & Carlos Padilla (2009). The Empathic Emotions and Self-Love in Bishop Joseph Butler and the Neurosciences. Journal of Religious Ethics 37 (4):577-612.
    In Joseph Butler, we have an account of human beings as moral beings that is, as this essay demonstrates, being supported by the recently emerging findings of the neurosciences. This applies particularly to Butler's portrayal of our empathic emotions. Butler discovered their moral significance for motivating and guiding moral decisions and actions before the neurosciences did. Butler has, in essence, added a sixth sense to our five senses: this is the moral sense by means of which we perceive what we (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  44. D. Evans & Pierre Cruse (eds.) (2004). Emotion, Evolution, and Rationality. Oxford University Press.
    For thousands of years, many Western thinkers have assumed that emotions are, at best, harmless luxuries, and at worst outright obstacles to intelligent action. In the past decade, however, scientists and philosophers have begun to challenge this 'negative view of emotion'. Neuroscientists, psychologists and researchers in artificial intelligence now agree that emotions are vital to intelligent action. Evolutionary considerations have played a vital role in this shift to a more positive view of emotion. -/- This book brings together some of (...)
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  45. Pablo Fernandez-Berrocal & Natalio Extremera (2005). About Emotional Intelligence and Moral Decisions. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 28 (4):548-549.
    This commentary explores the use of interaction between moral heuristics and emotional intelligence (EI). The main insight presented is that the quality of moral decisions is very sensitive to emotions, and hence this may lead us to a better understanding of the role of emotional abilities in moral choices. In doing so, we consider how individual differences (specifically, EI) are related to moral decisions. We summarize evidence bearing on some of the ways in which EI might moderate framing effects in (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  46. Cordelia Fine (2006). Is the Emotional Dog Wagging its Rational Tail, or Chasing It? Philosophical Explorations 9 (1):83 – 98.
    According to Haidt's (2001) social intuitionist model (SIM), an individual's moral judgment normally arises from automatic 'moral intuitions'. Private moral reasoning - when it occurs - is biased and post hoc, serving to justify the moral judgment determined by the individual's intuitions. It is argued here, however, that moral reasoning is not inevitably subserviant to moral intuitions in the formation of moral judgments. Social cognitive research shows that moral reasoning may sometimes disrupt the automatic process of judgment formation described by (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  47. Per Fjelstad, Restraint and Emotion in Cicero's.
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  48. Philippa Foot (1958). Moral Beliefs. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 59:83 - 104.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  49. William W. Fortenbaugh (2008). Aristotle and Theophrastus on the Emotions. In John T. Fitzgerald (ed.), Passions and Moral Progress in Greco-Roman Thought. Routledge.
  50. William W. Fortenbaugh (2002). Aristotle on Emotion: A Contribution to Philosophical Psychology, Rhetoric, Poetics, Politics, and Ethics. Duckworth.
1 — 50 / 354