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  1. Jonathan E. Adler (1995). Book Review:Moral Imagination: Implications of Cognitive Science for Ethics. Mark Johnson. [REVIEW] Ethics 105 (2):401-.
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  2. John K. Alexander (2005). Metaphors, Moral Imagination and the Healthy Business Organisation. Philosophy of Management 5 (3):43-53.
    In this paper I outline an approach to managerial decision making that incorporates the important role that metaphors and moral imagination play in our moral reasoning coupled with an organisational moral concept I call the Health of the Organisation. I have used this concept in my managerial (and philosophical) career to interpret and evaluate potential, and actual, courses of action. I have concluded that this concept fits in nicely with Mark Johnson’s analysis of the metaphor of morality is health, which (...)
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  3. Wayne Allen (2002). Hannah Arendt and the Political Imagination. International Philosophical Quarterly 42 (3):349-369.
    If we understand Arendt’s work on totalitarianism as the beginning of her philosophizing, then we can better appreciate her concern with human nature and better judge her Existenz philosophy. Certifying Arendt as an existentialist allows those who would label her to recast her ideas into the language of modernity and thereby abolish the nature that stalks modem theorizing. Eliminating nature as a reckoning also obliterates history as an anchor and offers modems unlimited will for shaping the future. But Arendt is (...)
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  4. Michael J. Almeida (2008). The Enlargement of Life: Moral Imagination at Work – John Kekes. Philosophical Quarterly 58 (231):374–377.
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  5. Leland Anderson (2008). A "More Excellent Way": Moral Imagination & The Art Of Judging. Notre Dame Journal of Law, Ethics and Public Policy 22 (2):399-424.
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  6. David Baggett (2004). Magic, Muggles and the Moral Imagination. In David Baggett, Shawn E. Klein & William Irwin (eds.), Harry Potter and Philosophy: If Aristotle Ran Hogwarts. Chicago: Open Court. 158--172.
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  7. Olivia Bailey (forthcoming). Empathy, Care, and Understanding in Adam Smith’s Theory of Moral Sentiments. The Adam Smith Review.
  8. Jennifer Ann Bates (2010). Hegel and Shakespeare on Moral Imagination. State University of New York Press.
    A Hegelian reading of good and bad luck -- In Shakespearean drama (phen. of spirit, King Lear, Othello, Hamlet, a Midsummer night's dream) -- Tearing the fabric: Hegel's Antigone, Shakespeare's Coriolanus, and kinship-state conflict (phen. of spirit c. 6, Judith Butler's Antigone, Coriolanus) -- Aufhebung and anti-aufhebung: geist and ghosts in Hamlet (phen. of spirit, Hamlet) -- The problem of genius in King Lear: Hegel on the feeling soul and the tragedy of wonder (anthropology and psychology in the encyclopaedia, Philosophy (...)
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  9. T. O. Beidelman (forthcoming). Moral Imagination in Kaguru Modes Of. Thought.
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  10. Michael Beran (1998). Lincoln, Macbeth, and the Moral Imagination. Humanitas 11 (2):4-21.
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  11. James Bernauer & Michael Mahon (2006). Michel Foucault's Ethical Imagination. In Gary Gutting (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Foucault. Cambridge University Press.
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  12. Peg Birmingham (2011). Arendt and Hobbes: Glory, Sacrificial Violence, and the Political Imagination. Research in Phenomenology 41 (1):1-22.
    The dominant narrative today of modern political power, inspired by Foucault, is one that traces the move from the spectacle of the scaffold to the disciplining of bodies whereby the modern political subject, animated by a fundamental fear and the will to live, is promised security in exchange for obedience and productivity. In this essay, I call into question this narrative, arguing that that the modern political imagination, rooted in Hobbes, is animated not by fear but instead by the desire (...)
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  13. Elisabeth Boetzkes Gedge (2004). Collective Moral Imagination: Making Decisions for Persons With Dementia. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 29 (4):435-450.
    Much debate concerning ‘precedent autonomy’ – that is, the authority of former, competent selves to govern the welfare of later, non-competent selves – has assumed a radical discontinuity between selves, and has overlooked the ‘bridging’ role of intimate proxy decision-makers. I consider a recent proposal by Lynn et al. (1999) that presents a provocative alternative, foregrounding an imagined dialogue between the formerly competent patient and her/his trusted others. I consider what standards must be met for such dialogues to have moral (...)
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  14. L. Ryan Musgrave Bonomo (2010). Addams's Philosophy of Art : Feminist Aesthetics and Moral Imagination at Hull House. In Maurice Hamington (ed.), Feminist Interpretations of Jane Addams. Pennsylvania State University Press.
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  15. L. Bretherton (2005). Book Review: Theopolitical Imagination: Discovering the Liturgy as a Political Act in an Age of Global Consumerism. [REVIEW] Studies in Christian Ethics 18 (3):141-144.
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  16. Rhona Brown, Leslie A. Chilton, Timothy Erwin, Evan Gottlieb, Christopher D. Johnson, Heather King, James Noggle, Adam Rounce & Adrianne Wadewitz (2014). Beyond Sense and Sensibility: Moral Formation and the Literary Imagination From Johnson to Wordsworth. Bucknell University Press.
    Drawing on philosophical thought from the eighteenth century as well as conceptual frameworks developed in the twenty-first century, the essays in Beyond Sense and Sensibility examine moral formation as represented in or implicitly produced by literary works of late eighteenth-century British authors.
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  17. Stratford Caldecott (2005). Nurturing the Moral Imagination. The Chesterton Review 31 (3/4):267-272.
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  18. Cheshire Calhoun (2002). Artless Integrity: Moral Imagination, Agency, and Stories Susan E. Babbitt Lanham, MD: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, 2001, Xix + 199 Pp., $60.00, $17.95 Paper. [REVIEW] Dialogue 41 (02):417-.
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  19. Timothy Chappell (2011). How to deliberate well about acting badly: Why moral imagination is a better resource than moral theory. Think 10 (29):71-82.
    Tim the terrorist: We have Tim the terrorist in custody, and we know that he knows where the bomb is that his group have secretly planted somewhere in central London, and we know that if we torture him hard enough he will reliably tell us where it is in time for us to defuse it, and we know that there is no other way of getting him to tell us, and we know that if we don't defuse it the bomb (...)
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  20. Wayne Christensen & John Sutton (2012). Reflections on Emotions, Imagination, and Moral Reasoning Toward an Integrated, Multidisciplinary Approach to Moral Cognition. In Robyn Langdon & Catriona Mackenzie (eds.), Emotions, Imagination, and Moral Reasoning. Psychology Press. 327-347.
    B eginning with the problem of integrating diverse disciplinary perspectives on moral cognition, we argue that the various disciplines have an interest in developing a common conceptual framework for moral cognition research. We discuss issues arising in the other chapters in this volume that might serve as focal points for future investigation and as the basis for the eventual development of such a framework. These include the role of theory in binding together diverse phenomena and the role of philosophy in (...)
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  21. Joanne B. Ciulla (1998). Imagination, Fantasy, Wishful Thinking and Truth. The Ruffin Series of the Society for Business Ethics 1998:99-107.
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  22. André Clair (2003). Justice, imagination et symbole. Revue Philosophique De Louvain 101 (3):413-433.
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  23. Bridget Clarke (2006). Imagination and Politics in Iris Murdoch's Moral Philosophy. Philosophical Papers 35 (3):387-411.
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  24. Mark Coeckelbergh & Jessica Mesman (2007). With Hope and Imagination: Imaginative Moral Decision-Making in Neonatal Intensive Care Units. [REVIEW] Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 10 (1):3 - 21.
    Although the role of imagination in moral reasoning is often neglected, recent literature, mostly of pragmatist signature, points to imagination as one of its central elements. In this article we develop some of their arguments by looking at the moral role of imagination in practice, in particular the practice of neonatal intensive care. Drawing on empirical research, we analyze a decision-making process in various stages: delivery, staff meeting, and reflection afterwards. We show how imagination aids medical practitioners demarcating moral categories, (...)
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  25. Mark Coeckelbergh & Ger Wackers (2007). Imagination, Distributed Responsibility and Vulnerable Technological Systems: The Case of Snorre A. Science and Engineering Ethics 13 (2):235-248.
    An influential approach to engineering ethics is based on codes of ethics and the application of moral principles by individual practitioners. However, to better understand the ethical problems of complex technological systems and the moral reasoning involved in such contexts, we need other tools as well. In this article, we consider the role of imagination and develop a concept of distributed responsibility in order to capture a broader range of human abilities and dimensions of moral responsibility. We show that in (...)
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  26. Jane Collier (2006). The Art of Moral Imagination: Ethics in the Practice of Architecture. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 66 (2/3):307 - 317.
    This paper addresses questions of ethics in the professional practice of architecture. It begins by discussing possible relationships between ethics and aesthetics. It then theorises ethics within concepts of 'practice', and argues for the importance of the context in architecture where narrative can be used to learn and to integrate past and present experience. Narrative reflection also takes in the future, and in the case of architecture there is a positive but not yet well accepted move (particularly within the 'academy') (...)
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  27. Mark Collier (2010). Hume's Theory of Moral Imagination. History of Philosophy Quarterly 27 (3):255-273.
    David Hume endorses three claims that are difficult to reconcile: (1) sympathy with those in distress is sufficient to produce compassion towards their plight, (2) adopting the general point of view often requires us to sympathize with the pain and suffering of distant strangers, but (3) our care and concern is limited to those in our close circle. Hume manages to resolve this tension, however, by distinguishing two types of sympathy. We feel compassion towards those around us because associative sympathy (...)
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  28. R. G. Collingwood (1935). The Historical Imagination. An Inaugural Lecture Delivered Before the University of Oxford on 28 October 1935. Clarendon Press.
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  29. Raymond De Vries (2005). Framing Neuroethics: A Sociological Assessment of the Neuroethical Imagination. American Journal of Bioethics 5 (2):25 – 27.
  30. R. A. Duff (1984). Realism and Imagination in Ethics By Sabina Lovibond Oxford: Basil Blackwell, 1983,238 Pp., £15.00. [REVIEW] Philosophy 59 (230):541-.
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  31. Sara Ebenreck (1996). Opening Pandora's Box: The Role of Imagination in Environmental Ethics. Environmental Ethics 18 (1):3-18.
    While the activity of imagination is present in much writing about environmental ethics, little direct attention has been given to clarifying its role. Both its significant presence and provocative theoretical work showing the central role of imagination in ethics suggest a need for discussion of its contributions. Environmental ethicists especially should attend to imagination because of the pervasive influence of metaphorical constructs of nature and because imaginative work is required to even partially envision the perspective of a nonhuman being. Without (...)
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  32. C. Elliott & B. Elliott (1991). From the Patient's Point of View: Medical Ethics and the Moral Imagination. Journal of Medical Ethics 17 (4):173-178.
    This paper concerns the difficulties of imagining the subjective point of view of another human being, and the relevance of these difficulties to medical decisions. It explores especially the difficulties of imagining the experience of the mentally impaired, and examines several standards for decision-making: the 'prior expressed wishes standard', the 'substituted judgement standard', and the 'best interests standard'.
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  33. D. Evans (2001). Imagination and Medical Education. Medical Humanities 27 (1):30-34.
    Rival and apparently exclusive views have been canvassed about the instrumental use of the humanities in medical education. The novel is seen as offering exemplifications of moral principles on the one hand, whilst on the other such an approach is said to miss the essence of reading a novel by misrepresenting the engagment of the reader. The use of the humanities in medicine as a stimulus to reflective practice is presented as a preferable account which recognises that there is truth (...)
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  34. Gregory M. Fahy (2006). John Dewey and Moral Imagination: Pragmatism in Ethics (Review). Journal of Speculative Philosophy 20 (1):71-73.
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  35. Ingrid Vendrell Ferran (2011). Can Literature Be Moral Philosophy? A Sceptical View on the Ethics of Literary Empathy. In Sebastian Hüsch (ed.), Philosopy and Literature and the Crisis of Metaphysics.
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  36. Colin Fisher & Shishir Malde (2011). Moral Imagination or Heuristic Toolbox? Events and the Risk Assessment of Structured Financial Products in the Financial Bubble. Business Ethics 20 (2):148-158.
    The paper uses the example of the failure of bankers and financial managers to understand the risks of dealing in structured financial products, before the financial collapse, to investigate how people respond to crises. It focuses on whether crises cause people to challenge their habitual frames by the application of moral imagination. It is proposed that the structure of financial products and their markets triggered the use of heuristics that contributed to the underestimation of risks. It is further proposed that (...)
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  37. Elisabeth Boetzkes Gedge (2004). Collective Moral Imagination: Making Decisions for Persons with Dementia. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 29 (4):435 – 450.
    Much debate concerning 'precedent autonomy' - that is, the authority of former, competent selves to govern the welfare of later, non-competent selves - has assumed a radical discontinuity between selves, and has overlooked the 'bridging' role of intimate proxy decision-makers. I consider a recent proposal by Lynn et al. (1999) that presents a provocative alternative, foregrounding an imagined dialogue between the formerly competent patient and her/his trusted others. I consider what standards must be met for such dialogues to have moral (...)
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  38. Martin Gibert & Morgane Paris (2010). L’imagination et les biais de l’empathie. Les Ateliers de l'Éthique / the Ethics Forum 5 (1):50-65.
    L'empathie est un mode émotionnel qui associe le point de vue d'autrui à des sensations physiologiques. Ce phénomène a tendance à être plus important envers certaines personnes qu'envers d'autres. Or, il existe parfois de bonnes raisons morales de promouvoir une empathie plus égalitaire. Notre hypothèse de psychologie morale est qu'il est possible d'utiliser l'imagination, et en particulier sa dimension volontaire et sa transparence aux émotions, pour corriger certains biais empathiques.
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  39. R. Gillon (1997). Imagination, Literature, Medical Ethics and Medical Practice. Journal of Medical Ethics 23 (1):3-4.
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  40. Michael Gorman (2005). Intellectual Property Rights, Moral Imagination, and Access to Life-Enhancing Drugs. Business Ethics Quarterly 15 (4):595-613.
    Although the idea of intellectual property (IP) rights—proprietary rights to what one invents, writes, paints, composes or creates—is firmlyembedded in Western thinking, these rights are now being challenged across the globe in a number of areas. This paper will focus on one of these challenges: government-sanctioned copying of patented drugs without permission or license of the patent owner in the name of national security, in health emergencies, or life-threatening epidemics. After discussing standard rights-based and utilitarian arguments defending intellectual property we (...)
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  41. Michael E. Gorman (2005). Heuristics, Moral Imagination, and the Future of Technology. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 28 (4):551-551.
    Successful application of heuristics depends on how a problem is represented, mentally. Moral imagination is a good technique for reflecting on, and sharing, mental representations of ethical dilemmas, including those involving emerging technologies. Future research on moral heuristics should use more ecologically valid problems and combine quantitative and qualitative methods.
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  42. Michael Gorman, Patricia Werhane & Nathan Swami (2009). Moral Imagination, Trading Zones, and the Role of the Ethicist in Nanotechnology. NanoEthics 3 (3):185-195.
    The societal and ethical impacts of emerging technological and business systems cannot entirely be foreseen; therefore, management of these innovations will require at least some ethicists to work closely with researchers. This is particularly critical in the development of new systems because the maximum degrees of freedom for changing technological direction occurs at or just after the point of breakthrough; that is also the point where the long-term implications are hardest to visualize. Recent work on shared expertise in Science & (...)
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  43. Karen Green (1997). The Passions and the Imagination in Wollstonecraft's Theory of Moral Judgement. Utilitas 9 (03):271-.
    According to Wollstonecraft . This suggests that for her ethical judgement is based on reason, and so she is an ethical cognitivist. This impression is upheld by the fact that she clearly believes in the existence of ethical truth and has little sympathy with subjectivism. At the same time, she places a great deal of importance on the role of the emotions in ethical judgement. This raises the question how the emotions can be relevant if ethics consists in a realm (...)
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  44. Charles L. Griswold Jr (2006). Imagination : Morals, Science, Arts. In Knud Haakonssen (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Adam Smith. Cambridge University Press.
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  45. Vigen Guroian (2005). Rallying the Really Human Things: Moral Imagination in Politics Literature & Everyday Lif. Intercollegiate Studies Institute.
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  46. Maurice Hamington (2010). The Will to Care: Performance, Expectation, and Imagination. Hypatia 25 (3):675 - 695.
    This article addresses the world's contemporary crisis of care, despite the abundance of information about distant others, by exploring motivations for caring and the rok of imagination. The ethical significance of caring is found in performance. Applying Victor Vroom's expectancy theory, caring performances are viewed as extensions of rational expectations regarding the efficacy of actions. The imagination creates these positive or negative expectations regarding the ability to effectively care. William James s notion of the will to believe offers a unique (...)
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  47. R. J. Hankinson (1990). Perception and Evaluation: Aristotle on the Moral Imagination. Dialogue 29 (01):41-.
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  48. R. J. Hankinson & Marguerite Deslauriers (1990). Aristotle on Imagination and Action: Introduction. Dialogue 29 (01):3-.
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  49. Patricia Hannam (2009). Philosophy with Teenagers: Nurturing a Moral Imagination for the 21st Century. Network Continuum.
    This book explains how P4C can facilitate young people's exploration of key ethical concerns of our time, such as sustainability, justice and intercultural and ...
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  50. Timothy J. Hargrave (2012). Discerning Possibilities for Action: A Typology of Approaches to Moral Imagination. Business and Society Review 117 (3):307-328.
    The existing literature on moral imagination proposes that actors can best respond to ethical dilemmas by tailoring their actions to the practical demands of the situation. It has done little to develop this insight, however. To address this gap, I used institutional theory to identify six ideal type approaches to moral imagination. I proposed that in addressing ethical dilemmas, the morally imaginative actor takes account of two situational factors: first, the social construction of the unmet ethical claim or obligation which (...)
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