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  1. Gry Ardal (2010). Self and Other in Trust and Distrust. Judging About Trustworthiness. In Arne Grøn & Claudia Welz (eds.), Trust, Sociality, Selfhood. Mohr Siebeck.
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  2. David W. Barnes (2005). Imwinkelried's Argument for Normative Ethical Testimony. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 33 (2):234-241.
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  3. Lawrence C. Becker (2000). Social Trust and Human Communities. [REVIEW] Dialogue 39 (01):173-.
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  4. Mark Bernstein (2002). Marginal Cases and Moral Relevance. Journal of Social Philosophy 33 (4):523–539.
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  5. S. Bok (forthcoming). Trust but Verify. Journal of Medical Ethics:2012-101207.
  6. Friedel Bolle & Jessica Kaehler (2006). Coleman's Hypothesis on Trusting Behaviour and a Remark on Meta‐Studies. Journal of Economic Methodology 13 (4):469-483.
    Coleman (1990) describes ?calculative trust?. He states that, in order to trust, the value of trust has to be larger than the value of mistrust. So if subjects have (not personally but on average) rational expectations about the trustworthiness of their transaction partners, we should expect the frequency of trust to increase with the average net profitability of trust. In a meta?study of trust experiments, Coleman's Hypothesis could not be confirmed while, in our own experiment with a wider parameter range, (...)
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  7. Luc Bovens (2008). Apologies. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 108 (1pt3):219-239.
    There is a cognitive, an affective, a conative, and an attitudinal component to a genuine apology. In discussing these components, I address the following questions. Might apologies be due for non-culpable actions? Might apologies be due for choices in moral dilemmas? What is the link between sympathy, remorse and making amends? Is it meaningful for resilient akratics to apologize? How much moral renewal is required when one apologizes? Why should apologies be offered in a humble manner? And is there some (...)
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  8. J. H. Burns (1993). Nature and Natural Authority in Bentham. Utilitas 5 (02):209-.
  9. Judith Butler (2008). Sexual Difference as a Question of Ethics. Chiasmi International 10:333-347.
  10. Craig B. Caldwell, Brian Pfanschmidt & Burdeane Orris (2009). The Effects of Deontological and Teleological Ethical Systems of Immediate Supervisors on Employee Trust. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society 20:1-11.
    This research seeks to extend the literature of trust by examining whether the amount of trust that employees have in their supervisors is contingent upon the ethical system of belief utilized by their immediate supervisors. To help answer this question, it is hypothesized that employees have a greater degree of trust in immediate supervisors practicing the deontological ethical system of belief than in those practicing the teleological ethical system of belief. This study begins the search for the moral frameworks that (...)
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  11. Claudia Card (1972). On Mercy. Philosophical Review 81 (2):182-207.
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  12. Mark Coeckelbergh (2012). Can We Trust Robots? Ethics and Information Technology 14 (1):53-60.
    Can we trust robots? Responding to the literature on trust and e-trust, this paper asks if the question of trust is applicable to robots, discusses different approaches to trust, and analyses some preconditions for trust. In the course of the paper a phenomenological-social approach to trust is articulated, which provides a way of thinking about trust that puts less emphasis on individual choice and control than the contractarian-individualist approach. In addition, the argument is made that while robots are neither human (...)
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  13. Zac Cogley (2012). Trust and the Trickster Problem. Analytic Philosophy 53 (1):30-47.
    In this paper, I articulate and defend a conception of trust that solves what I call “the trickster problem.” The problem results from the fact that many accounts of trust treat it similar to, or identical with, relying on someone’s good will. But a trickster could rely on your good will to get you to go along with his scheme, without trusting you to do so. Recent philosophical accounts of trust aim to characterize what it is for one person to (...)
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  14. J. D. Conway (1961). Modern Moral Problems. Notre Dame, Ind.,Fides Publishers.
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  15. Shane D. Courtland (2007). Brian Barry, Why Social Justice Matters (Cambridge: Polity Press, 2005), Pp. VII + 311. Utilitas 19 (4):522-524.
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  16. J. de Wispelaere (2000). Andrew Mason (Ed.), Ideals on Equality. Utilitas 12 (2):243-247.
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  17. Tom Dougherty (2013). No Way Around Consent: A Reply to Rubenfeld on 'Rape-by-Deception'. Yale Jaw Journal Online 123:321-333.
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  18. Tom Dougherty (2013). Sex Lies and Consent. Ethics 123 (4):717-744.
    How wrong is it to deceive someone into sex by lying, say, about one's profession? The answer is seriously wrong when the liar's actual profession would be a deal breaker for the victim of the deception: this deception vitiates the victim's sexual consent, and it is seriously wrong to have sex with someone while lacking his or her consent.
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  19. Thomas Douglas (2013). Human Enhancement and Supra-Personal Moral Status. Philosophical Studies 162 (3):473-497.
    Several authors have speculated that (1) the pharmaceutical, genetic or other technological enhancement of human mental capacities could result in the creation of beings with greater moral status than persons, and (2) the creation of such beings would harm ordinary, unenhanced humans, perhaps by reducing their immunity to permissible harm. These claims have been taken to ground moral objections to the unrestrained pursuit of human enhancement. In recent work, Allen Buchanan responds to these objections by questioning both (1) and (2). (...)
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  20. Thomas Douglas (2010). Intertemporal Disagreement and Empirical Slippery Slope Arguments. Utilitas 22 (2):184-197.
    One prevalent type of slippery slope argument has the following form: (1) by doing some initial act now, we will bring it about that we subsequently do some more extreme version of this act, and (2) we should not bring it about that we do this further act, therefore (3) we should not do the initial act. Such arguments are frequently regarded as mistaken, often on the grounds that they rely on speculative or insufficiently strong empirical premises. In this article (...)
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  21. Keith Dowding (2001). Rational Choice and Trust. Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 4 (4):207-220.
  22. Heather Dyke (2003). Introduction. In , Time and Ethics: Essays at the Intersection. Kluwer Academic Publishers. 1--7.
    Ethics seeks answers to questions about the moral status of human actions and human lives. What should I do, and what should I not do? What sort of life should I lead? Actions and lives are temporal things. Actions are performed at certain times, are informed by past events and have consequences for the future. Lives have temporal extension, and are experienced from a sequence of temporal perspectives. Thus, one would think that answers to ethical questions should take account some (...)
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  23. Cécile Fabre (2010). Distributive Justice and Freedom: Cohen on Money and Labour. Utilitas 22 (4):393-412.
    In his recent Rescuing Justice and Equality, G. A. Cohen mounts a sustained critique of coerced labour, against the background of a radical egalitarian conception of distributive justice. In this article, I argue that Cohenian egalitarians are committed to holding the talented under a moral duty to choose socially useful work for the sake of the less fortunate. As I also show, Cohen's arguments against coerced labour fail, particularly in the light of his commitment to coercive taxation. In the course (...)
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  24. Cécile Fabre (2009). Against Body Exceptionalism: A Reply to Eyal. Utilitas 21 (2):246-248.
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  25. Cécile Fabre (2009). Is the Body Special? Review of Cecile Fabre, Whose Body is It Anyway? Justice and the Integrity of the Person. Utilitas 21 (2).
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  26. Cécile Fabre (2003). Justice and the Compulsory Taking of Live Body Parts. Utilitas 15 (02):127-.
    This paper argues that, if one thinks that the needy have a right to the material resources they need in order to lead decent lives, one must be committed, in some cases, to conferring on the sick a right that the healthy give them some of the body parts they need to lead such a life. I then assess two objections against that view, to wit: to confer on the sick a right to the live body parts of the healthy (...)
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  27. Joel Feinberg (1965). Action and Responsibility. In Max Black (ed.), Philosophy in America. Ithaca, N.Y.,Cornell University Press. 134--160.
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  28. Albert Flores (1994). Ethics, Trust, and the Professions. Teaching Philosophy 17 (2):177-179.
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  29. William C. Frederick (1995). Competing with Integrity. The Ruffin Series in Business Ethics:285-285.
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  30. Arne Grøn (2010). Basic Trust?. Trust, Sociality, Selfhood. In Arne Grøn & Claudia Welz (eds.), Trust, Sociality, Selfhood. Mohr Siebeck.
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  31. Arne Grøn & Claudia Welz (eds.) (2010). Trust, Sociality, Selfhood. Mohr Siebeck.
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  32. Louis M. Guenin (2005). Intellectual Honesty. Synthese 145 (2):177 - 232.
    Engaging a listener’s trust imposes moral demands upon a presenter in respect of truthtelling and completeness. An agent lies by an utterance that satisfies what are herein defined as signal and mendacity conditions; an agent deceives when, in satisfaction of those conditions, the agent’s utterances contribute to a false belief or thwart a true one. I advert to how we may fool ourselves in observation and in the perception of our originality. Communication with others depends upon a convention or practice (...)
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  33. Daniel Halliday (2013). Kok-Chor Tan, Justice, Institutions, and Luck: The Site, Ground, and Scope of Equality (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2012), Pp. Ix + 208. [REVIEW] Utilitas 25 (1):121-132.
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  34. Toby Handfield & Trevor Pisciotta (2005). Is the Risk–Liability Theory Compatible with Negligence Law? Legal Theory 11 (4):387-404.
    David McCarthy has recently suggested that our compensation and liability practices may be interpreted as reflecting a fundamental norm to hold people liable for imposing risk of harm on others. Independently, closely related ideas have been criticised by Stephen R. Perry and Arthur Ripstein as incompatible with central features of negligence law. We aim to show that these objections are unsuccessful against McCarthy’s Risk–liability theory, and that such an approach is a promising means both for understanding the moral basis of (...)
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  35. Elizabeth Harman (2003). The Potentiality Problem. Philosophical Studies 114 (1-2):173 - 198.
    Many people face a problem about potentiality: their moral beliefs appear to dictate inconsistent views about the significance of the potentiality to become a healthy adult. Briefly, the problem arises as follows. Consider the following two claims. First, both human babies and cats have moral status, but harms to babies matter more, morally, than similar harms to cats. Second, early human embryos lack moral status. It appears that the first claim can only be true if human babies have more moral (...)
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  36. Nicole Hassoun (2009). Meeting Need. Utilitas 21 (3):250-275.
    This paper considers the question ‘How should institutions enable people to meet their needs in situations where there is no guarantee that all needs can be met?’ After considering and rejecting several simple principles for meeting needs, it suggests a new effectiveness principle that 1) gives greater weight to the needs of the less well off and 2) gives weight to enabling a greater number of people to meet their needs. The effectiveness principle has some advantage over the main competitors (...)
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  37. Karen D. Hoffman (2008). Forgiveness Without Apology. Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 82:135-151.
    In the following paper, I argue that, although there are conditions that the injured person must satisfy in order to be properly said to have forgiven a wrongdoer, it is a mistake to believe that there are conditions that the wrongdoer must satisfy in order for it to be morally permissible to forgive her. Against arguments that a wrongdoer should only be forgiven if she has met specific conditions, I maintain that unconditional forgiveness may be a morally appropriate response to (...)
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  38. John Horton (1993). Moral Conflict and Political Commitment. Utilitas 5 (01):109-.
  39. John Horton (1989). Politics, Innocence and the Limits of Goodness. P. Johnson, London, Routledge, 1988, Pp. 283. Utilitas 1 (02):316-.
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  40. Barbara Houston (2001). Dilemmas of Trust. Dialogue 40 (2):380-381.
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  41. Thomas Hurka (2006). Value and Friendship: A More Subtle View. Utilitas 18 (3):232-242.
    T. M. Scanlon has cited the value of friendship in arguing against a ‘teleological’ view of value which says that value inheres only in states of affairs and demands only that we promote it. This article argues that, whatever the teleological view's final merits, the case against it cannot be made on the basis of friendship. The view can capture Scanlon's claims about friendship if it holds, as it can consistently with its basic ideas, that (i) friendship is a higher-level (...)
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  42. Robert Huseby (2011). Spinning the Wheel or Tossing a Coin? Utilitas 23 (2):127-139.
    In the literature on the so-called numbers problem, some authors have recently argued that the individualist lottery (IL) avoids the flaws of the proportional lottery. This article first presents two recent defenses of the IL, and then argues that both are implausible if we focus, as we should, strictly on their non-consequentialist aspects. This conclusion holds even if we take account of the fact that the IL is arguably that solution to the numbers problem which best meets the marginal difference (...)
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  43. Pier Jaarsma, Petra Gelhaus & Stellan Welin (2012). Living the Categorical Imperative: Autistic Perspectives on Lying and Truth Telling–Between Kant and Care Ethics. [REVIEW] Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 15 (3):271-277.
    Lying is a common phenomenon amongst human beings. It seems to play a role in making social interactions run more smoothly. Too much honesty can be regarded as impolite or downright rude. Remarkably, lying is not a common phenomenon amongst normally intelligent human beings who are on the autism spectrum. They appear to be ‘attractively morally innocent’ and seem to have an above average moral conscientious objection against deception. In this paper, the behavior of persons with autism with regard to (...)
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  44. Dale Jamieson (2002). Is There Progress in Morality? Utilitas 14 (03):318-.
    My question, which is central to the business of moral philosophy, is implicitly addressed by many philosophers, yet explicitly addressed by only a few. In this paper I address the question head-on, and propose a qualified affirmative answer.
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  45. Brett Kaplan (1994). Trust. International Studies in Philosophy 26 (1):33-44.
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  46. Erin I. Kelly (2005). Ethical Disagreement in Theory and Practice. Journal of Social Philosophy 36 (3):382–387.
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  47. Justin Klocksiem (2012). A Defense of the Counterfactual Comparative Account of Harm. American Philosophical Quarterly 49 (4):285 – 300.
    Although the counterfactual comparative account of harm, according to which someone is harmed when things go worse for her than they otherwise would have, is intuitively plausible, it has recently come under attack. There are five serious objections in the literature: some philosophers argue that the counterfactual account makes it hard to see how we could harm someone in the course of benefitting that person; others argue that Parfit’s non-identity problem is particularly problematic; another objection claims that the account forces (...)
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  48. Hugh LaFollette (2005). Living on a Slippery Slope. Journal of Ethics 9 (3-4):475 - 499.
    Our actions, individually and collectively, inevitably affect others, ourselves, and our institutions. They shape the people we become and the kind of world we inhabit. Sometimes those consequences are positive, a giant leap for moral humankind. Other times they are morally regressive. This propensity of current actions to shape the future is morally important. But slippery slope arguments are a poor way to capture it. That is not to say we can never develop cogent slippery slope arguments. Nonetheless, given their (...)
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  49. Alex Leveringhaus (2012). The Moral Status of Combatants During Military Humanitarian Intervention. Utilitas 24 (02):237-258.
    Recent debates in just war theory have been concerned with the status of combatants during war. Unfortunately, however, the debate has, up to now, focused on self-defensive wars. The present article changes the focus slightly by exploring the status of combatants during military humanitarian intervention (MHI). It begins by arguing that MHI poses a number of challenges to our thinking about the status of combatants. To solve these it draws on Jeff McMahan's theory of combatant liability. On this basis, the (...)
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  50. William MacAskill (2014). Replaceability, Career Choice, and Making a Difference. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 17 (2):269-283.
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