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  1. Emanuele Antonelli (2013). The Child of Fortune: Envy and the Constitution of the Social Space. Contagion 20 (1):117-140.
    In this paper, we will sketch out a simple scheme to evaluate different ways in which Western society has coped with the momentous and hidden problem of envy; afterward, we will consider the consequences for the constitution of the social space that these changes entail. We will argue that envy, when considered as a primal feeling, can shed light on René Girard’s notion of metaphysical desire and on diasparagmos rituals. Then, taking into account Jean-Pierre Dupuy’s endogenous fixed point thesis—concerning the (...)
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  2. Ruben Apressyan (2012). The Principle of Toleration. Journal of Philosophical Research 37 (Supplement):223-227.
    As a moral principle toleration is universal, but only in the sense that potentially it is addressed to every rational and moral agent. The question is whether this principle is appropriate in all situations and what are those moral agents who recognize its practical actuality for them? Toleration is not an absolute ethical principle, but one among others in the context of a particular moral system. It should be given a proper place in the hierarchy of principles. Understanding toleration as (...)
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  3. J. M. Bernstein (2011). Trust: On the Real but Almost Always Unnoticed, Ever-Changing Foundation of Ethical Life. Metaphilosophy 42 (4):395-416.
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  4. S. Bok (forthcoming). Trust but Verify. Journal of Medical Ethics:2012-101207.
  5. Sonya Charles (2011). On the Immorality of Lying to Children About Their Origins. Philosophy in the Contemporary World 18 (2):22-33.
    Using the moral work on trust and lying, I argue that allowing or encouraging children to believe you are their biological parent when you are not is a breach of trust in the parent-child relationship. While other approaches focus on specific harms or the rights of the child, I make a virtue theory argument based on our understanding of trust, lies, and the nature of the parent-child relationship. Drawing heavily on Nancy Potter's virtue theory of trustworthiness, I consider the nature (...)
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  6. Coye Cheshire, Judd Antin, Karen S. Cook & Elizabeth Churchill (2010). General and Familiar Trust in Websites. Knowledge, Technology and Policy 23 (3-4):311-331.
    When people rely on the web to gather and distribute information, they can build a sense of trust in the websites with which they interact. Understanding the correlates of trust in most websites (general website trust) and trust in websites that one frequently visits (familiar website trust) is crucial for constructing better models of risk perception and online behavior. We conducted an online survey of active Internet users and examined the associations between the two types of web trust and several (...)
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  7. Bruce Christianson (2013). Living in an Impossible World: Real-Izing the Consequences of Intransitive Trust. [REVIEW] Philosophy and Technology 26 (4):411-429.
    Many accounts of online trust are based upon mechanisms for building reputation. Trust is portrayed as desirable, and handing off trust is easier if trust is modelled to be transitive. But in the analysis of cyber-security protocols, trust is usually used as a substitute for certain knowledge: it follows that if there is no residual risk, then there is no need for trust. On this grimmer understanding, the less that users are required to trust, the better. Involuntary transitivity of trust (...)
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  8. Mark Colyvan, Mating, Dating, and Mathematics: It's All in the Game.
    Why do people stay together in monogamous relationships? Love? Fear? Habit? Ethics? Integrity? Desperation? In this paper I will consider a rather surprising answer that comes from mathematics. It turns out that cooperative behaviour, such as mutually-faithful marriages, can be given a firm basis in a mathematical theory known as game theory. I will suggest that faithfulness in relationships is fully accounted for by narrow self interest in the appropriate game theory setting. This is a surprising answer because faithful behaviour (...)
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  9. S. D. Noam Cook (2010). Making the Technological Trustworthy. Knowledge, Technology and Policy 23 (3-4):455-459.
    Joseph C. Pitt, based on his understanding of trust and of technology, makes the provocative argument that trusting technology is actually a matter of trusting people. I agree with Pitt’s conclusion but differ with him on the nature of trust. I contend, nonetheless, that my understanding of trust actually reinforces Pitt’s characterization of technology as “humanity at work.”.
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  10. Jeffrey M. Courtright (2013). Is Trust Like an 'Atmosphere'? Understanding the Phenomenon of Existential Trust. Philosophy in the Contemporary World 20 (1):39-51.
    This article defends what I call the atmospheric claun about trust: at least one form of trust manifests itself in human life in a manner that is like an atmosphere (generalized, ambient, and diffuse). I also provide a provisional defense of the claim that trust is a necessary condition for the thriving of something that matters to us. I offer a phenomenological sketch of existential trust. Existential trust is a primordial and atmospheric (generalized, ambient, and diffuse) manifestation of trust that (...)
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  11. Richard Dees (2007). The Bond of Friendship and Trust: Liberal Societies in the Face of Evil. The Modern Schoolman 85 (1):71-87.
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  12. Neil Delaney (2010). What Romance Could Not Be. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 84 (3):589-598.
    This essay makes a number of distinctions between the motives of love and of duty, and argues that ideally they act in concert so as to generate constancy in loving relations. The essay revolves around a case in which a husband or wife is tempted to infidelity. It is argued that resistance to the temptation is optimally grounded in love for the spouse rather than simply in a duty to resist initiated perhaps through promise or vow. This is not, however, (...)
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  13. Dorothy E. Denning (2010). Comments on Responsibility of and Trust in ISPs. Knowledge, Technology and Policy 23 (3-4):399-401.
    Picking up on the themes of ISP responsibility and trust raised by Raphael Cohen-Almagor, this paper discusses the problem of removing inappropriate content from the Internet. It suggests that an approach based on community involvement such as used by YouTube may be preferable to one that relies on artificial intelligence to detect inappropriate content. The paper also suggests ways in which ISPs could help increase trust in the Internet by strengthening security.
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  14. Massimo Durante (2010). What Is the Model of Trust for Multi-Agent Systems? Whether or Not E-Trust Applies to Autonomous Agents. Knowledge, Technology and Policy 23 (3-4):347-366.
    A socio-cognitive approach to trust can help us envisage a notion of networked trust for multi-agent systems (MAS) based on different interacting agents. In this framework, the issue is to evaluate whether or not a socio-cognitive analysis of trust can apply to the interactions between human and autonomous agents. Two main arguments support two alternative hypothesis; one suggests that only reliance applies to artificial agents, because predictability of agents’ digital interaction is viewed as an absolute value and human relation is (...)
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  15. Martin Endreß & Andrea Pabst (2013). Violence and Shattered Trust: Sociological Considerations. [REVIEW] Human Studies 36 (1):89-106.
    The paper starts from a phenomenology of violence that reconsiders the phenomenal contours of the seemingly opposed concepts of violence, on the one hand physical violence and on the other hand structural violence. We argue that the implied definiteness of their reciprocal separableness is not given. Instead, violence should be understood as the negation of sociality. As such, it is closely related to a basic form of trust in relation to people’s self-awareness, and their relation to others and to the (...)
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  16. H. Tristram Engelhardt Jr (1993). Personhood, Moral Strangers, and the Evil of Abortion: The Painful Experience of Post-Modernity. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 18 (4):419-421.
    The epistemological and sociological consequences of post-modernity include the inability to show moral strangers, in terms they can see as binding, the moral wrongness of activities such as abortion. Such activities can be perceived as morally disordered within a content-full moral narrative, but not outside of the context it brings. Though one can salvage something of the Enlightenment project of justifying a morality that can bind moral strangers, one is left with moral and metaphysical views that can be recognized as (...)
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  17. Charles M. Ess (2010). Trust and New Communication Technologies: Vicious Circles, Virtuous Circles, Possible Futures. [REVIEW] Knowledge, Technology and Policy 23 (3-4):287-305.
    I approach the philosophical analyses of the phenomenon of trust vis-à-vis online communication beginning with an overview from within the framework of computer-mediated communication (CMC) of concerns and paradigmatic failures of trust in the history of online communication. I turn to the more directly philosophical analyses of trust online by first offering an introductory taxonomy of diverse accounts of trust that have emerged over the past decade or so. In the face of important objections to the possibility of establishing and (...)
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  18. Jordi Fernández (2013). Self-Deception and Self-Knowledge. Philosophical Studies 162 (2):379-400.
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  19. Gabriel Flynn & Julian Clarke (2011). Leadership and Integrity. Philosophy of Management 10 (1):9-28.
    This paper formulates a vision for leadership based on integrity in business, banking, government and politics. It proposes a tripartite response to the current grave difficulties affecting international finance and markets: a renewal of values and virtues, acceptance of the centrality of the human person, and appropriate recourse to key principles of Catholic social teaching, as articulated in Pope Benedict XVI’s encyclical, Caritas in Veritate. By considering Ireland’s “Celtic Tiger” period, particularly the actions of the Anglo Irish Bank, we show (...)
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  20. Tomás Földesi (1989). Can the Discussion Partners Trust Each Other? Dialectics and Humanism 16 (3-4).
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  21. Barbro Fröding (forthcoming). Hope as a Virtue in an Aristotelian Context. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 19 (3):183-186.
    Michael Barilan’s article “From Hope in Palliative Care to Hope as a Virtue and a Life Skill” is an interesting and informative contribution to the debate on the nature of ‘a good death.’ Broadly speaking, the author seeks to explore “the roles and meanings of promotion focus goals in human life” and how hope can aid in alleviating suffering (Barilan 2012, 171). The subject is topical and courtesy of being clinically active, Barilan is able to add a welcome perspective. Very (...)
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  22. Axel Gelfert (2013). Testimony, Trust & Authority by Benjamin McMyler, 2011 New York, NY, Oxford University Press Viii + 178 Pp, $65.00 (Hb). [REVIEW] Journal of Applied Philosophy 30 (1):101-103.
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  23. Carolyn Gratton (1983). Phenomenological and Traditional Views of Trust Between Clients and Therapists. Duquesne Studies in Phenomenological Psychology 4:90-104.
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  24. Wendy M. Grossman (2013). Hypocrisy and Abortion. The Philosophers' Magazine 62 (62):26-27.
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  25. Matthew Harding (2013). Trust and Fiduciary Law. Oxford Journal of Legal Studies 33 (1):81-102.
    How can it be that the fiduciary relationship has trust at its core if trust is neither a necessary nor a sufficient condition for the existence of such a relationship? My aim in this article is to make some arguments that I think might assist in solving that puzzle. First, I argue that fiduciary relationships are likely to be characterized by relatively ‘thick’ interpersonal trust. Secondly, I argue that moral duties referring to trust play a role in the justification of (...)
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  26. Katherine Hawley (2014). Trust, Distrust and Commitment. Noûs 48 (1):1-20.
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  27. Katherine Hawley (2013). Knowledge on Trust. By Paul Faulkner. (Oxford UP, 2011. Pp. 240. Price £37.00.). [REVIEW] Philosophical Quarterly 63 (250):170-171.
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  28. Jason J. Howard (2008). The Trouble with Our Convictions. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 10:149-155.
    In recent decades few moral concepts have suffered as much neglect at the hands of ethicists as the notion of conscience. My paper argues that this neglect is largely in reaction to an ‘authoritarian’ conception of conscience that is outdated and based on a naïve faculty psychology. When construed in terms of a narrative of self-integration, in which conscience designates our struggle to balance the affective and cognitive dimensions of moral experience, its neglect appears unjustified. It is my contention that (...)
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  29. Edward A. Johnson (1997). Real Ascriptions of Self-Deception Are Fallible Moral Judgments. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 20 (1):117-118.
    Mele's jointly sufficient conditions for self-deception preclude definitive ascriptions of self-deception in practice. Consequently, actual ascriptions of self-deception require large inferences and may frequently be in error. It is recommended that attention be directed toward actual practices of ascription to understand how children learn and adults dispense what is ultimately a moral judgment.
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  30. Linus Johnsson, Gert Helgesson, Mats G. Hansson & Stefan Eriksson (2013). Adequate Trust Avails, Mistaken Trust Matters: On the Moral Responsibility of Doctors as Proxies for Patients' Trust in Biobank Research. Bioethics 27 (9):485-492.
    In Sweden, most patients are recruited into biobank research by non-researcher doctors. Patients' trust in doctors may therefore be important to their willingness to participate. We suggest a model of trust that makes sense of such transitions of trust between domains and distinguishes adequate trust from mistaken trust. The unique position of doctors implies, we argue, a Kantian imperfect duty to compensate for patients' mistaken trust. There are at least three kinds of mistaken trust, each of which requires a different (...)
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  31. Rick Kenney & Kimiko Akita (2012). The Epistemology of Retweeting and The Ethics of Trust. Journal of Mass Media Ethics 27 (1):68-70.
    Journal of Mass Media Ethics, Volume 27, Issue 1, Page 68-70, January-March.
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  32. Camilla Kronqvist (2011). The Promise That Love Will Last. Inquiry 54 (6):650 - 668.
    Abstract What sense are we to make of the promise of love against the contingency of human life? I discuss two replies to this question: (1) the suggestion that marriage, based on the probable success of this kind of relationship, is a more or less worthwhile endeavour (cf. Moller and Landau), and (2) Martha Nussbaum's Aristotelian proposal that we only live life fully if we embrace aspects of life, such as loving relationships, that are vulnerable to fortune. I show that (...)
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  33. Paul Lauritzen (1997). Hear No Evil, See No Evil, Think No Evil: Ethics and the Appeal to Experience. Hypatia 12 (2):83 - 104.
    This essay distinguishes three types of appeals to experience in ethics, identifies problems with appealing to experience, and argues that appeals to experience must be open to critical assessment, if experientially-based arguments are to be useful. Unless competing and potentially irreconcilable experiences can be assessed and adjudicated, experientially-based arguments will be problematic. The paper recommends thinking of the appeal to experience as a kind of storytelling to be evaluated as other stories are.
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  34. B. Leisen & M. R. Hyman (2001). An Improved Scale for Assessing Patients' Trust in Their Physician. Health Marketing Quarterly 19 (1):23--42.
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  35. Rick Lewis (2004). Trust the People. Philosophy Now 46:4-4.
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  36. Luis Lobo-Guerrero (2013). Uberrima Fides, Foucault and the Security of Uncertainty. International Journal for the Semiotics of Law - Revue Internationale de Sémiotique Juridique 26 (1):23-37.
    Uberrima Fides is a legal doctrine that governs insurance contracts and expects all parties to the insurance agreement to act in good faith by declaring all material facts relative to a policy. The doctrine originated in England in 1766 with the case Carter v Boehm ruled by Lord Mansfield. Ever since, it has become, with some differences in interpretation, a cornerstone of insurance relationships around the world. The role that trust plays within it, however, is not simple and should not (...)
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  37. Joan S. Lockard (1997). Distal Versus Proximal Mechanisms of “Real” Self-Deception. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 20 (1):120-121.
    There is little fear that the concept of motivational bias as proposed by Mele is likely to dampen the current academic ferment (see Mele's Introduction) with respect to self-deception for several reasons: (a) like philosophy, science has more recently abandoned the heuristic of a rational human mind; (b) the concept is parsimonious, applicable to many research topics other than self-deception, and, therefore, scientifically serviceable; (c) as a proximal mechanism it addresses process rather than function, that is, how rather than why (...)
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  38. Michael Losonsky (1997). Self-Deceivers' Intentions and Possessions. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 20 (1):121-122.
    Although Mele's four sufficient conditions for self-deception are on track insofar as they avoid the requirement that self-deception involves contradictory beliefs, they are too weak, because they are broad enough to include cases of bias or prejudice that are not typical cases of self-deception. I discuss what distinguishes self-deception from other forms of bias.
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  39. Kevin Lynch (2009). Prospects for an Intentionalist Theory of Self-Deception. Abstracta 5 (2):126-138.
    A distinction can be made between those who think that self-deception is frequently intentional and those who don’t. I argue that the idea that self-deception has to be intentional can be partly traced to a particular invalid method for analyzing reflexive expressions of the form ‘Ving oneself’ (where V stands for a verb). However, I take the question of whether intentional self-deception is possible to be intrinsically interesting, and investigate the prospects for such an alleged possibility. Various potential strategies of (...)
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  40. Tony Lynch & A. R. J. Fisher (2012). Pure Hypocrisy. Philosophy in the Contemporary World 19 (1):32-43.
    We argue that two mam accounts of hypocrisy— the deception-based and the moral-non-seriousness-based account—fail to capture a specific kind of hypocrite who is morally serious and sincere "all the way down." The kind of hypocrisy exemplified by this hypocrite is irreducible to deception, self-deception or a lack of moral seriousness. We call this elusive and peculiar kind of hypocrisy, pure hypocrisy. We articulate the characteristics of pure hypocrisy and describe the moral psychology of two kinds of pure hypocrites.
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  41. Mike W. Martin (2006). From Morality to Mental Health: Virtue and Vice in a Therapeutic Culture. OUP USA.
    Morality and mental health are now inseparably linked in our view of character. Alcoholics are sick, yet they are punished for drunk driving. Drug addicts are criminals, but their punishment can be court ordered therapy. The line between character flaws and personality disorders has become fuzzy, with even the seven deadly sins seen as mental disorders. In addition to pathologizing wrong-doing, we also psychologize virtue; self-respect becomes self-esteem, integrity becomes psychological integration, and responsibility becomes maturity. Moral advice is now sought (...)
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  42. Alfred R. Mele (1997). Understanding and Explaining Real Self-Deception. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 20 (1):127-134.
    This response addresses seven main issues: (1) alleged evidence that in some instances of self-deception an individual simultaneously possesses “contradictory beliefs”; (2) whether garden-variety self-deception is intentional; (3) whether conditions that I claimed to be conceptually sufficient for self-deception are so; (4) significant similarities and differences between self-deception and interpersonal deception; (5) how instances of self-deception are to be explained, and the roles of motivation in explaining them; (6) differences among various kinds of self- deception; (7) whether a proper conception (...)
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  43. Diana Meyers, Part 2.3 Self-Direction and Personal Integration.
    Because it is characteristic of competencies that they have overarching functions, Meyers considers what the overarching function of autonomy competency might be. She defends a view of personal integration that does not entail counterproductive consistency or unity. She rejects several other solutions to this problem, including compartmentalization, sanity, happiness, and eccentric nonconformity.
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  44. Kathleen Dean Moore (2005). The Truth of the Barnacles. Environmental Ethics 27 (3):265-277.
    Beginning with Rachel Carson’s small book, The Sense of Wonder, I explore the moral significance of a sense of wonder—the propensity to respond with delight, awe, or yearning to what is beautiful and mysterious in the natural world when it unexpectedly reveals itself. An antidote to the view that the elements of the natural world are commodities to be disdained or destroyed, a sense of wonder leads us to celebrate and honor the more-than-human world, to care for it, to protect (...)
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  45. Kate Moran (forthcoming). Delusions of Virtue: Kant on Self-Conceit. Kantian Review.
    Little extended attention has been given to Kant’s notion of self-conceit (Eigendünkel), though it appears throughout his theoretical and practical philosophy. Authors who have discussed self-conceit often describe it as a kind of imperiousness or arrogance in which the conceited agent seeks to impose selfish principles upon others, or perhaps even sees others as worthless. I argue that these features of self-conceit are actually symptoms of a deeper and more thoroughgoing failure. Self-conceit is best described as the tendency to insist (...)
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  46. Christian Morgner (2013). Trust and Confidence: History, Theory and Socio-Political Implications. [REVIEW] Human Studies 36 (4):509-532.
    Even before trust became a buzzword, theoretical developments were made, which have instigated the development of two forms of trust which are described as personal trust and system trust/confidence. However, this distinction remained rather secondary in the overall literature. There is an overall lack on the historical developments of these forms of trust, their internal logic and how they interlink, overlap, or work against each other. The paper aims to advance these three aspects: first through a historical overview of the (...)
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  47. Caroline Nevejan & Frances Brazier (2012). Granularity in Reciprocity. AI and Society 27 (1):129-147.
    Witnessing in merging biological, social and algorithmic realities is crucial to trust, as modelled in the YUTPA framework. Being witness and bearing witness is fundamental to human interaction. System participation in human communities of practice challenges the notion of witnessing and therefore the ability to build trust. Nevertheless, through trial and error, people in a variety of practices have found ways to establish the presence and develop trust in merging realities. This paper presents the results of 20 in-depth interviews with (...)
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  48. Igor Newerly (2001). A Man You Can Trust. Dialogue and Universalism 11 (9-10):21-28.
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  49. Glen Newey (2006). Anna Elisabetta Galeotti, Toleration as Recognition (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press 2002), Pp. Viii + 242. Utilitas 18 (03):310-.
  50. Emer O'Hagan (2012). Self-Knowledge and Moral Stupidity. Ratio 25 (3):291-306.
    Most commonplace moral failure is not conditioned by evil intentions or the conscious desire to harm or humiliate others. It is more banal and ubiquitous – a form of moral stupidity that gives rise to rationalization, self-deception, failures of due moral consideration, and the evasion of responsibility. A kind of crude, perception-distorting self-absorption, moral stupidity is the cause of many moral missteps; moral development demands the development of self-knowledge as a way out of moral stupidity. Only once aware of the (...)
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