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  1. Stephen W. Ball (1990). Uncertainty in Moral Theory: An Epistemic Defense of Rule-Utilitarian Liberties. Theory and Decision 29 (2):133-160.
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  2. William P. Cheshire (2004). A Response to Commentators on "Human Embryo Research and the Language of Moral Uncertainty". American Journal of Bioethics 4 (1):31-32.
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  3. William P. Cheshire (2004). Human Embryo Research and the Language of Moral Uncertainty. American Journal of Bioethics 4 (1):1 – 5.
    In bioethics as in the sciences, enormous discussions often concern the very small. Central to public debate over emerging reproductive and regenerative biotechnologies is the question of the moral status of the human embryo. Because news media have played a prominent role in framing the vocabulary of the debate, this study surveyed the use of language reporting on human embryo research in news articles spanning a two-year period. Terminology that devalued moral status - for example, the descriptors things, property, tissue, (...)
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  4. David Enoch, Moral Deference.
    Everyone agrees, I think, that there is something fishy about moral deference and expertise, but that's where consensus ends. This paper has two aims – the first is to mount a defense of moral deference, and the second is to offer a (non-debunking) diagnosis of its fishiness. I defend moral deference by connecting the discussion of moral deference to the recent discussion of the appropriate response to uncertainty. It is, I argue, morally obligatory to minimize the risk of one's wrongdoing (...)
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  5. Edward J. Gracely (1996). On the Noncomparability of Judgments Made by Different Ethical Theories. Metaphilosophy 27 (3):327-332.
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  6. Frederick Grinnell (2004). Human Embryo Research: From Moral Uncertainty to Death. American Journal of Bioethics 4 (1):12 – 13.
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  7. Alexander A. Guerrero (2007). Don't Know, Don't Kill: Moral Ignorance, Culpability, and Caution. [REVIEW] Philosophical Studies 136 (1):59-97.
    This paper takes on several distinct but related tasks. First, I present and discuss what I will call the “Ignorance Thesis,” which states that whenever an agent acts from ignorance, whether factual or moral, she is culpable for the act only if she is culpable for the ignorance from which she acts. Second, I offer a counterexample to the Ignorance Thesis, an example that applies most directly to the part I call the “Moral Ignorance Thesis.” Third, I argue for a (...)
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  8. Johan E. Gustafsson & Olle Torpman (2014). In Defence of My Favourite Theory. Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 95 (2):159–174.
    One of the principles on how to act under moral uncertainty, My Favourite Theory, says roughly that a morally conscientious agent chooses an option that is permitted by the most credible moral theory. In defence of this principle, we argue that it prescribes consistent choices over time, without relying on intertheoretic comparisons of value, while its main rivals are either plagued by moral analogues of money pumps or in need of a method for making non-arbitrary intertheoretic comparisons. We rebut the (...)
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  9. Oswald Hanfling (2008). Moral Knowledge and Moral Uncertainty. Philosophical Investigations 31 (2):105–123.
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  10. James L. Hudson (1989). Subjectivization in Ethics. American Philosophical Quarterly 26 (3):221 - 229.
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  11. Ted Lockhart (2000). Moral Uncertainty and its Consequences. Oxford University Press.
    We are often uncertain how to behave morally in complex situations. In this controversial study, Ted Lockhart contends that moral philosophy has failed to address how we make such moral decisions. Adapting decision theory to the task of decision-making under moral uncertainly, he proposes that we should not always act how we feel we ought to act, and that sometimes we should act against what we feel to be morally right. Lockhart also discusses abortion extensively and proposes new ways to (...)
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  12. Ted Lockhart (1992). Professions, Confidentiality, and Moral Uncertainty. Professional Ethics 1 (3/4):33-52.
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  13. Laurence B. McCullough (1995). Preventive Ethics, Professional Integrity, and Boundary Setting: The Clinical Management of Moral Uncertainty. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 20 (1):1-11.
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  14. D. Moller (2011). Abortion and Moral Risk. Philosophy 86 (3):425-443.
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  15. Dan Moller, Moral Risk.
    It is natural for those with permissive attitudes toward abortion to suppose that, if they have examined all of the arguments they know against abortion and have concluded that they fail, their moral deliberations are at an end. Surprisingly, this is not the case, as I argue. This is because the mere risk that one of those arguments succeeds can generate a moral reason that counts against the act. If this is so, then liberals may be mistaken about the morality (...)
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  16. Dan Moller (2009). Book Reviews:Living with Uncertainty: The Moral Significance of Ignorance. [REVIEW] Ethics 119 (3):606-611.
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  17. Daniel Nica (2013). Narrative and Justification in Moral Particularism. Romanian Journal of Analytic Philosophy (2):22-32.
    In this paper I will discuss the problem of justification in moral particularism. The first part is concerned with Jonathan Dancy’s account of justification, which is a narrative one. To justify one’s choice is to present a persuasive description of the context in a narrative fashion, not to subordinate singular cases to universal rules. Since it dismisses arguments and employs persuasiveness, this view seems irrational, so the second part of my paper will consist of a personal reconstruction and reformulation of (...)
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  18. Ittay Nissan-Rozen (2012). Doing the Best One Can: A New Justification for the Use of Lotteries. Erasmus Journal for Philosophy and Economics 5 (1):45-72.
    : In some cases in which rational and moral agents experience moral uncertainty, they are unable to assign exact degrees of moral value—in a non-arbitrary way—to some of the different acts available to them, and so are unable to choose with certainty the best act. This article presents a new justification for the use of lotteries in this kind of situation. It is argued that sometimes the only rational thing for a morally motivated agent to do here is to use (...)
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  19. Linda Radzik (2009). Living with Uncertainty: The Moral Significance of Ignorance * By MICHAEL J. ZIMMERMAN. [REVIEW] Analysis 69 (4):785-787.
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  20. Peter Railton (2008). Coping with Moral Uncertainty. [REVIEW] Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 77 (3):794-801.
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  21. Jacob Ross (2006). Rejecting Ethical Deflationism. Ethics 116 (4):742-768.
    One of the perennial challenges of ethical theory has been to provide an answer to a number of views that appear to undermine the importance of ethical questions. We may refer to such views collectively as “deflationary ethical theories.” These include theories, such as nihilism, according to which no action is better than any other, as well as relativistic theories according to which no ethical theory is better than any other. In this article I present a new response to such (...)
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  22. Andrew Sepielli, Moral Uncertainty and the "Fetishism" Objection.
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  23. Andrew Sepielli, Intertheoretic Comparisons of Value.
    A new solution to the problem of intertheoretic comparisons of value. This is the view I currently accept, and should be regarded as superseding the view presented in What to Do When You Don't Know What to Do.
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  24. Andrew Sepielli (forthcoming). Subjective and Objective Reasons. In Daniel Star (ed.), Oxford Handbook of Reasons and Normativity. Oxford.
    NOTE: This is a first draft. Please do not cite. Suggestions welcome./.
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  25. Andrew Sepielli (2014). Should You Look Before You Leap? The Philosophers' Magazine 66:89-93.
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  26. Andrew Sepielli (2013). What to Do When You Don't Know What to Do When You Don't Know What to Do…. Noûs 47 (1):521-544.
  27. Andrew Sepielli (2013). Moral Uncertainty and the Principle of Equity Among Moral Theories1. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 86 (3):580-589.
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  28. Andrew Sepielli (2012). Normative Uncertainty for Non-Cognitivists. Philosophical Studies 160 (2):191-207.
    Normative judgments involve two gradable features. First, the judgments themselves can come in degrees; second, the strength of reasons represented in the judgments can come in degrees. Michael Smith has argued that non-cognitivism cannot accommodate both of these gradable dimensions. The degrees of a non-cognitive state can stand in for degrees of judgment, or degrees of reason strength represented in judgment, but not both. I argue that (a) there are brands of noncognitivism that can surmount Smith’s challenge, and (b) any (...)
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  29. Andrew Sepielli (2012). Subjective Normativity and Action Guidance. In Mark Timmons (ed.), Oxford Studies in Normative Ethics, Vol. II. Oxford University Press.
  30. Andrew Sepielli (2009). What to Do When You Don't Know What to Do. Oxford Studies in Metaethics 4:5-28.
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  31. Andrew Sepielli (2006). Ted Lockhart, Moral Uncertainty and Its Consequences:Moral Uncertainty and Its Consequences. Ethics 116 (3):601-604.
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  32. Michael Smith & Frank Jackson (2006). Absolutist Moral Theories and Uncertainty. Journal of Philosophy 103 (6):267-283.
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  33. Kevin Timpe (2009). Review of Michael Zimmerman, Living with Uncertainty: The Moral Significance of Ignorance. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2009 (9).
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  34. Howard Trachtman (2004). Full Court Press: A Response to "Human Embryo Research and the Language of Moral Uncertainty" by William P. Cheshire. American Journal of Bioethics 4 (1):33-34.
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  35. Brian Weatherson (2002). Review: Moral Uncertainty and its Consequences. [REVIEW] Mind 111 (443):693-696.
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  36. Michael J. Zimmerman (2008). Living with Uncertainty: The Moral Significance of Ignorance. Cambridge University Press.
    Every choice we make is set against a background of massive ignorance about our past, our future, our circumstances, and ourselves. Philosophers are divided on the moral significance of such ignorance. Some say that it has a direct impact on how we ought to behave - the question of what our moral obligations are; others deny this, claiming that it only affects how we ought to be judged in light of the behaviour in which we choose to engage - the (...)
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