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  1. G. E. M. Anscombe (1979). Prolegomenon to a Pursuit of the Definition of Murder. Dialectics and Humanism 6 (4):73-77.
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  2. G. E. M. Anscombe, War and Murder.
    Two attitudes are possible: one, that the world is an absolute jungle and that the exercise of coercive power by rulers is only a manifestation of this; and the other, that it is both necessary and right that there should be this exercise of power, that through it the world is much less of a jungle than it could possibly be without it, so that one should in principle be glad of the existence of such power, and only take exception (...)
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  3. J. P. V. D. Balsdon (1951). The 'Murder' of Drusus, Son of Tiberius. The Classical Review 1 (02):75-.
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  4. A. A. Barb (1972). Cain's Murder-Weapon and Samson's Jawbone of an Ass. Journal of the Warburg and Courtauld Institutes 35:386-389.
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  5. Alessia T. Bell (2000). Criminal Law/Medical Malpractice: Court Strikes Down Murder Conviction of Physician Where Inappropriate Care Led to Patient's Death. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 28 (2):194-195.
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  6. Jeremy Allen Byrd (2007). The Perfect Murder: A Philosophical Whodunit. Synthese 157 (1):47 - 58.
    In his Reasons and Persons, Derek Parfit argues from the possibility of cases of fission and/or fusion of persons that one must reject identity as what matters for personal survival. Instead Parfit concludes that what matters is “psychological connectedness and/or continuity with the right kind of cause,” or what he calls an R-relation. In this paper, I argue that, if one accepts Parfit’s conclusion, one must accept that R-relations are what matter for moral responsibility as well. Unfortunately, it seems that (...)
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  7. Michael Cholbi (2006). Race, Capital Punishment, and the Cost of Murder. Philosophical Studies 127 (2):255 - 282.
    Numerous studies indicate that racial minorities are both more likely to be executed for murder and that those who murder them are less likely to be executed than if they murder whites. Death penalty opponents have long attempted to use these studies to argue for a moratorium on capital punishment. Whatever the merits of such arguments, they overlook the fact that such discrimination alters the costs of murder; racial discrimination imposes higher costs on minorities for murdering through tougher sentences, and (...)
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  8. Romane Clark (1986). Murderers Are Not Obliged to Murder; Another Solution to Forrester's Paradox. Philosophical Papers 15 (1):51-57.
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  9. Daniel Cohen & Morgan Luck (2009). Why a Victim's Age is Irrelevant When Assessing the Wrongness of Killing. Journal of Applied Philosophy 26 (4):396-401.
    abstract Intuitively, all killings are equally wrong, no matter how old one's victim. In this paper we defend this claim — The Equal Wrongness of Killings Thesis — against a challenge presented by Kasper Lippert-Rasmussen. Lippert-Rasmussen shows The Equal Wrongness of Killings Thesis to be incompatible with two further theses: The Unequal Wrongness of Renderings Unconscious Thesis and The Equivalence Thesis. Lippert-Rasmussen argues that, of the three, The Equal Wrongness of Killings Thesis is the least defensible. He suggests that the (...)
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  10. Thomas V. Cohen (2002). Reflections on Retelling a Renaissance Murder. History and Theory 41 (4):7–16.
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  11. Raphael Cohen-Almagor & Sharon Haleva-Amir (2008). Bloody Wednesday in Dawson College - The Story of Kimveer Gill, or Why Should We Monitor Certain Websites to Prevent Murder. Studies in Ethics, Law, and Technology 2 (3).
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  12. Clayton E. Cramer (1994). Ethical Problems of Mass Murder Coverage in the Mass Media. Journal of Mass Media Ethics 9 (1):26 – 42.
    This article analyzes news coverage of mass murders in Time and Newsweek for the period 1984 to 1991 for evidence of disproportionate, perhaps politically motivated coverage of certain categories of mass murder. Discusses ethical problems related to news and entertainment attention to mass murder, and suggests methods of enhancing the public's understanding of the nature of murder.
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  13. Martin Cropp (2003). Tragic Violations E. Belfiore: Murder Among Friends. Violation of Philia in Greek Tragedy . Pp. XIX + 282. Newyork and Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2000. Cased, £36.50. Isbn: 0-19-513149-. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 53 (01):16-.
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  14. Malcolm Davies (1994). Odyssey 22.474–7: Murder or Mutilation? Classical Quarterly 44 (02):534-.
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  15. Michael Davis (2010). What Punishment for the Murder of 10,000? Res Publica 16 (2):101-118.
    Those who commit crime on a grand scale, numbering their victims in the thousands, seem to pose a special problem both for consequentialist and for non-consequentialist theories of punishment, a problem the International Criminal Court makes practical. This paper argues that at least one non-consequentialist theory of punishment, the fairness theory, can provide a justification of punishment for great crimes. It does so by dividing the question into two parts, the one of proportion which it answers directly, and the other (...)
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  16. Daniel C. Dennett (1997). Did Hal Committ Murder? In D. Stork (ed.), Hal's Legacy: 2001's Computer As Dream and Reality. MIT Press.
    The first robot homicide was committed in 1981, according to my files. I have a yellowed clipping dated 12/9/81 from the Philadelphia Inquirer--not the National Enquirer--with the headline: Robot killed repairman, Japan reports The story was an anti-climax: at the Kawasaki Heavy Industries plant in Akashi, a malfunctioning robotic arm pushed a repairman against a gearwheel-milling machine, crushing him to death. The repairman had failed to follow proper instructions for shutting down the arm before entering the workspace. Why, indeed, had (...)
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  17. Philip E. Devine (1979). The Conscious Acceptance of Guilt in the Necessary Murder. Ethics 89 (3):221-239.
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  18. Nora Devlin (2010). The Ethics of Archiving "Murderabilia". Journal of Information Ethics 19 (1):126-140.
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  19. Nicholas Everitt (1992). What's Wrong with Murder? Some Thoughts on Human and Animal Killing. International Journal of Applied Philosophy 7 (1):47-54.
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  20. Marie Failinger (2009). The Lesser Violence Than Murder and the Face-to-Face : 'Illegal' Immigrants Stand Over American Law. In Desmond Manderson (ed.), Essays on Levinas and Law: A Mosaic. Palgrave Macmillan.
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  21. James William Forrester (1984). Gentle Murder, or the Adverbial Samaritan. Journal of Philosophy 81 (4):193-197.
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  22. Romayne Smith Fullerton & Maggie Jones Patterson (2006). Murder in Our Midst: Expanding Coverage to Include Care and Responsibility. Journal of Mass Media Ethics 21 (4):304 – 321.
    Using a U.S. and a Canadian example, in this article we argue that news reports of murder, especially of the heavily covered signal crimes that become part of community storytelling, often employ predetermined formulas that probe intrusively into the lives of those involved in the murder but ultimately come away with only cheaply sketched, stick-figure portraits. The thesis is that crime coverage that is formulaic tends to produce cynicism and a distance between the reader and those involved in the crime. (...)
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  23. P. T. Geach (1976). Murder and Sodomy. Philosophy 51 (197):346 - 348.
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  24. Lou Goble (1991). Murder Most Gentle: The Paradox Deepens. Philosophical Studies 64 (2):217 - 227.
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  25. Laurence Goldstein (1992). A Buridanian Discussion of Desire, Murder and Democracy. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 70 (4):405 – 414.
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  26. Kurt Gray, Simulating Murder: The Aversion to Harmful Action.
    Diverse lines of evidence point to a basic human aversion to physically harming others. First, we demonstrate that unwillingness to endorse harm in a moral dilemma is predicted by individual differences in aversive reactivity, as indexed by peripheral vasoconstriction. Next, we tested the specific factors that elicit the aversive response to harm. Participants performed actions such as discharging a fake gun into the face of the experimenter, fully informed that the actions were pretend and harmless. These simulated harmful actions increased (...)
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  27. E. Griew (1986). Reducing Murder to Manslaughter: Whose Job? Journal of Medical Ethics 12 (1):18-23.
    This paper compares two versions of the diminished responsibility defence, which reduces murder to manslaughter: the present statutory formulation and a proposed reformulation. The comparison confirms that evidence such as psychiatrists are commonly invited to give in murder cases takes them beyond their proper role. Paradoxically, although the two formulations mean essentially the same thing, the proposed change of wording must have the practical effect of subduing the psychiatrist's evidence. This conclusion leads to speculation about why psychiatrists are at present (...)
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  28. Boris Groys (2000). The Russian Novel as a Serial Murder or the Poetics of Bureaucracy. In Willem van Reijen & Willem G. Weststeijn (eds.), Subjectivity. Rodopi.
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  29. Christopher Hamilton (2007). Nietzsche and the Murder of God. Religious Studies 43 (2):165-182.
    Nietzsche's tortured relationship to the Christian God has received scant attention from commentators. In this paper I seek to map out the central lines a proper understanding of Nietzsche in this regard might take. I argue that fundamental in such an understanding is Nietzsche's profoundly corporeal moral vocabulary, and I trace connections between this vocabulary and Nietzsche's concern with cleanliness, his asceticism, and the notion of a sense of common humanity with others.
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  30. J. R. Hamilton (1985). Murder Into Manslaughter. Journal of Medical Ethics 11 (3):160-160.
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  31. R. M. Hare (1977). Geach on Murder and Sodomy. Philosophy 52 (202):467 - 472.
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  32. Sharon E. Hartline (1997). Battered Woman Who Kill: Victims and Agents of Violence. Journal of Social Philosophy 28 (2):56-67.
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  33. D. W. Haslett (2003). Murder and the Exception for Fair Competition. Social Theory and Practice 29 (4):631-654.
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  34. D. W. Haslett (1984). Is Allowing Someone to Die the Same as Murder? Social Theory and Practice 10 (1):81-95.
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  35. Graham Haydon (1999). 2. Right, Wrong and Murder. Journal of Philosophy of Education 33 (1):11–22.
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  36. Steve Heilig (1991). Murder or Mercy? The Debate Over Active Euthanasia has Only Just Begun. HEC Forum 3 (2):95-98.
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  37. Barbara Herman (1989). Murder and Mayhem. The Monist 72 (3):411-431.
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  38. Jasper S. Hunt & Glenn Webster (1981). Soul Murder, Prehensions, and Symbolic Reference: Some Reflections on Whitehead's Philosophy of Education. Educational Theory 31 (3-4):333-339.
  39. Richiko Ikeda (2001). Defining Crime: Signs of Postmodern Murder and the "Freeze" Case of Yoshihiro Hattori. American Journal of Semiotics 17 (1):19-84.
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  40. Ellison Kahn (1984). Murder as a Fine Art. In , The Sanctity of Human Life. University of the Witwatersrand.
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  41. Evelyn Kennerly (1986). Mass Media & Mass Murder: American Coverage of the Holocaust. Journal of Mass Media Ethics 2 (1):61 – 70.
    In recent years, historians David S. Wyman and Deborah E. Lipstadt have contended in carefully documented books that the U.S. media provided inadequate coverage of Holocaust developments. Thus, these historians contend, American media helped create public apathy, which led to inadequate responses of the Roosevelt administration to requests for aid to Holocaust victims. Wyman believes ?several hundred thousand?; Jews might have been saved from gas chambers if the United States had insisted on determined Allied rescue action earlier than belated efforts (...)
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  42. Diane K. Kjervik (1981). The Psychiatric Nurse's Duty to Warn Potential Victims of Homicidal Psychotherapy Outpatients. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 9 (4):11-16.
  43. Steven Lattimore (1987). Two Men in a Boat: Antiphon, on the Murder of Herodes 42. Classical Quarterly 37 (02):502-.
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  44. Curtis D. Lebaron & JÜrgen Streeck (1997). Built Space and the Interactional Framing of Experience During a Murder Interrogation. Human Studies 20 (1):1-25.
    Human interaction and communication involve space in multiple ways. This paper examines the spatial and interactional order of a covertly video-taped police interrogation. When the participants enter the interrogation room and become engaged in the interrogation process, the room itself is a constraint and a resource for interaction. While interacting within a built environment, the participants appropriate their material surroundings in ways that constitute a spatial order and make possible certain arguments. This paper examines how the physical structure of the (...)
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  45. Harry Lesser (1980). Suicide and Self-Murder. Philosophy 55 (212):255 - 257.
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  46. Alejandro López-Rousseau & Timothy Ketelaar (2006). Juliet: If They Do See Thee, They Will Murder Thee. A Satisficing Algorithm for Pragmatic Conditionals. Mind and Society 5 (1):71-77.
    In a recent Mind & Society article, Evans (2005) argues for the social and communicative function of conditional statements. In a related article, we argue for satisficing algorithms for mapping conditional statements onto social domains (Eur J Cogn Psychol 16:807–823,2004). The purpose of the present commentary is to integrate these two arguments by proposing a revised pragmatic cues algorithm for pragmatic conditionals.
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  47. M. Luck (2008). Miracles and Moral Culpability: How To Murder Your Parishioners and Get Away With It. Studies in Christian Ethics 21 (2):239-249.
    I argue that there exists a proportional relationship between degrees of moral culpability and degrees of probability, where the more an agent believes her actions will result in certain consequences, the more morally culpable she is for these consequences. I assert that this degree of probability is necessarily diminished by the existence of active supernatural powers. Consequently, agents who believe in such powers are less morally culpable than agents who do not.
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  48. Morgan Luck (2009). The Gamer's Dilemma: An Analysis of the Arguments for the Moral Distinction Between Virtual Murder and Virtual Paedophilia. [REVIEW] Ethics and Information Technology 11 (1):31-36.
    Most people agree that murder is wrong. Yet, within computer games virtual murder scarcely raises an eyebrow. In one respect this is hardly surprising, as no one is actually murdered within a computer game. A virtual murder, some might argue, is no more unethical than taking a pawn in a game of chess. However, if no actual children are abused in acts of virtual paedophilia (life-like simulations of the actual practice), does that mean we should disregard these acts with the (...)
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  49. Niccolò Machiavelli (2007/2008). The Prince: Machiavelli's Description of the Methods of Murder Adopted by Duke Valentino & the Life of Castruccio Castracani. Arc Manor Publishers.
    The first modern treatise of political philosophy, The Prince remains one of the world’s most influential and widely read books. Machiavelli, whose name has become synonymous with expedient exercises of will, reveals nothing less than the secrets of power: how to gain it, how to wield it, and how to keep it. But curiously, this work of outspoken clarity has, for centuries, inspired myriad interpretations as to its author’s true message. The Introduction by noted Italian Renaissance scholar Albert Russell Ascoli (...)
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  50. Deborah Mathieu (1992). Crime and Punishment: Abortion as Murder? Journal of Social Philosophy 23 (2):5-22.
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