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  1. Imants Baruss & M. Wammes (2009). Characteristics of Spontaneous Musical Imagery. Journal of Consciousness Studies 16 (1):37-61.
    This study follows upon Steven Brown's 2006 article in The Journal of Consciousness Studies about the ‘perpetual music track', a form of constant musical imagery. With Brown's assistance, a Musical Imagery Questionnaire was developed. The questionnaire was then administered to 67 participants with the intention of establishing relevant scales for quantifying the presence and extent of spontaneous musical imagery in individuals. In addition to the Musical Imagery Questionnaire, the Six Factor Personality Questionnaire, as well as the Transliminality Scale, which is (...)
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  2. Steven Brown (2006). The Perpetual Music Track: The Phenomenon of Constant Musical Imagery. Journal of Consciousness Studies 13 (6):43-62.
    The perpetual music track is a new concept that describes a condition of constant or near-constant musical imagery. This condition appears to be very rare even among composers and musicians. I present here a detailed self-analysis of musical imagery for the purpose of defining the psychological features of a perpetual music track. I have music running through my head almost constantly during waking hours, consisting of a combination of recently-heard pieces and distant pieces that spontaneously pop into the head. (...)
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  3. Andreas Dorschel (2012). Der Welt abhanden kommen. Über musikalischen Eskapismus. Merkur 66 (2012):135-142.
    Escape from worldly dealings can be sought on a number of routes – music may open one of them. For its matter, sound, is forever fleeting, and in its realm, before and beyond language, no duties and obligations arise. Yet these features are not, as they seem, rooted in the nature of music; rather, they were shaped thus in the history that art underwent in Europe during the 19th century.
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  4. Andreas Dorschel (2011). Individualism for the Masses: Aesthetic Paradox in Mahler’s Symphonic Thought. In Elisabeth Kappel (ed.), The Total Work of Art: Mahler’s Eighth Symphony in Context. Universal Edition. 46-60.
    In his Eighth Symphony Gustav Mahler envisions modern artistic production to steer clear of an alternative emerging at the time: that between popular music on the one hand and esoteric avantgarde music on the other; Mahler’s music is meant to reach the masses, but without descending to audiences’ lowest common denominator. One query through which Mahler’s paradoxical aesthetic vision of an ‘individualism for the masses’ can be explored has been hinted at by the composer himself: Does his integral symphonic work (...)
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  5. Andreas Dorschel (2007). Das anwesend Abwesende: Musik und Erinnerung. In , Resonanzen. Vom Erinnern in der Musik. Universal Edition. 12-29.
    Remembrance is constitutive of music. For music emerges not as an isolated physical stimulus. Rather, it is experienced, i.e., a present musical moment is tied to its temporal antecedents. It is tempting to conceive of remembrance as repetition and as thus opposed to oblivion. Yet to memory selectivity is crucial. What is not selected, falls into oblivion. Hence as we remember we have forgotten already. The present moment evokes remembrance, and exhibits what was then in the light of what is (...)
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  6. Andreas Dorschel (2006). Vom Beginnen. Bruckner und die Wechselfälle des Ursprungs im 19. Jahrhundert. In Hans-Joachim Hinrichsen & Laurenz Lütteken (eds.), Bruckner – Brahms: Urbanes Milieu als kompositorische Lebenswelt im Wien der Gründerzeit. Bärenreiter. 128-143.
    ‚Origin‘ must be counted among the 19th century’s obsessions. Following the lead of 18th century Enlightenment, subverting origins rather than venerating them became a theoretical preoccupation. Yet art – specifically the art of music – dealt with origins in a different way. That way eludes the obvious alternative of either awe or unmasking. It is specifically modern: The work of art attends to its own genesis. The different versions of the beginning of Bruckner’s Fourth Symphony disclose a subtle craft of (...)
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  7. Andreas Dorschel (2005). Was hat Musik im Film zu suchen? In , Tonspuren. Musik im Film: Fallstudien 1994 - 2001. Universal Edition. 12-21.
    Attempts to bestow a musical background upon spoken drama have been deemed widely superfluous; most films, by way of contrast, do employ music. This aesthetic divergence invites an account of film music in terms of lack and compensation. The standard account in such terms, viz. that music has to fill the vacuum of silence, does not explain what it is supposed to explain. Rather, music in cinema can restore in a different way the expression lost as reality is reduced to (...)
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  8. Andreas Dorschel (2004). Erwartung und Vorurteil in der Musik. In , Dem Ohr voraus. Erwartung und Vorurteil in der Musik. Universal Edition. 12-23.
    Art is whatever it is mediated through anticipations of diverse kinds. To the temporal art of music such anticipations are crucial. Composers and performers build up expectations in their musical works and interpretations, thwart them, delay their fulfillment, fulfill them. Some of these expectations arise on the level of chosen genre, others are peculiar to the individual composition. Listeners, correspondingly, may adjust their expectations or, alternatively, attempt to uphold them at any price, turning them into prejudices. And, as anything in (...)
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  9. Andreas Dorschel (2004). Vom Genießen. Reflexionen zu Richard Strauss. In , Gemurmel unterhalb des Rauschens. Theodor W. Adorno und Richard Strauss. Universal Edition. 23-37.
    The work of Richard Strauss has been disparaged as a music designed to be relished (“Genußmusik” was Adorno’s term), lacking any dimension of ‘transcendence’. The notion of ‘relish’ or ‘pleasure’ (“Genuß”), used for characterization rather than disparagement, can disclose crucial aspects of Strauss’s art, though it does not exhaust it. To oppose ‘relish’ or ‘pleasure’ (“Genuß”) to ‘transcendence’, however, either uses hidden theological premises or disregards that ‘relish’ or ‘pleasure’ (“Genuß”), bound to be pervious to its object, does transcend towards (...)
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Music and Emotion
  1. Bruce Adolphe (1999). Of Mozart, Parrots and Cherry Blossoms in the Wind: A Composer Explores Mysteries of the Musical Mind. Limelight Editions.
    The exhilarating mix of humor, philosophy, fact and whimsy that marks these essays derives from more than 200 lectures Bruce Adolphe has given over most of the ...
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  2. Patricia V. Agostino, Guy Peryer & Warren H. Meck (2008). How Music Fills Our Emotions and Helps Us Keep Time. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 31 (5):575-576.
    Whether and how music is involved in evoking emotions is a matter of considerable debate. In the target article, Juslin & Vll (J&V) argue that music induces a wide range of both basic and complex emotions that are shared with other stimuli. If such a link exists, it would provide a common basis for considering the interactions among music, emotion, timing, and time perception.
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  3. Lars-Olof Åhlberg (1994). Susanne Langer on Representation and Emotion in Music. British Journal of Aesthetics 34 (1):69-80.
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  4. Rita Aiello & John A. Sloboda (eds.) (1994). Musical Perceptions. Oxford University Press.
    Musical Perceptions is a much-needed text that introduces students of both music and psychology to the study of music perception and cognition. Because the book aims to foster a closer interaction between research in the science and the art of music, both psychologists and musicians contribute chapters on a wide range of topics, including the philosophy of music; research in musical performance; perception of melody, tonality, and rhythm; pedagogical issues; language and music; and neural networks. With their unique ability to (...)
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  5. Gerhard Albersheim (1960). The Sense of Space in Tonal and Atonal Music. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 19 (1):17-30.
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  6. R. T. Allen (1990). The Arousal and Expression of Emotion by Music. British Journal of Aesthetics 30 (1):57-61.
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  7. Leo Apostel, Herman Sabbe & Fernand J. Vandamme (eds.) (1986). Reason, Emotion, and Music: Towards a Common Structure for Arts, Sciences, and Philosophies, Based on a Conceptual Framework for the Description of Music. Communication & Cognition.
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  8. Claire Armon-Jones (1991). Varieties of Affect. University of Toronto Press.
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  9. Philip Ball (2010). The Music Instinct: How Music Works and Why We Can't Do Without It. Oxford University Press.
    Now in The Music Instinct , award-winning writer Philip Ball provides the first comprehensive, accessible survey of what is known--and still unknown--about how ...
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  10. Albert Balz (1914). Music and Emotion. Journal of Philosophy, Psychology and Scientific Methods 11 (9):236-244.
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  11. Christopher Bartel (2010). Why Music Moves Us - Jeanette Bicknell. [REVIEW] Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 68 (3):317-319.
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  12. Alexander Becker & Matthias Vogel (eds.) (2007). Musikalischer Sinn: Beiträge Zu Einer Philosophie der Musik. Suhrkamp.
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  13. Harris M. Berger (2009). Stance: Ideas About Emotion, Style, and Meaning for the Study of Expressive Culture. Wesleyan University Press.
    Locating stance -- Structures of stance in lived experience -- Stance and others, stance and lives -- The social life of stance and the politics of expressive culture.
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  14. Karol Berger, Anthony Newcomb & Reinhold Brinkmann (eds.) (2005). Music and the Aesthetics of Modernity: Essays. Distributed by Harvard University Press.
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  15. Laurence D. Berman (1993). The Musical Image: A Theory of Content. Greenwood Press.
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  16. Jeanette Bicknell (2007). Explaining Strong Emotional Responses to Music:. Journal of Consciousness Studies 14 (12):5-23.
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  17. Daniela Lenti Boero & Luciana Bottoni (2008). Why We Experience Musical Emotions: Intrinsic Musicality in an Evolutionary Perspective. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 31 (5):585-586.
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  18. Paul Boghossian (2007). Explaining Musical Experience. In Kathleen Stock (ed.), Philosophers on Music: Experience, Meaning, and Work. Oxford University Press.
    1. I start with the observation that we often respond to a musical performance with emotion -- even if it is just the performance of a piece of absolute music, unaccompanied by text, title or programme. We can be exhilarated after a Rossini overture brought off with subtlety and panache; somber and melancholy after Furtlanger’s performance of the slow movement of the Eroica. And so forth. These emotions feel like the real thing to me – or anyway very close to (...)
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  19. Malcolm Budd (2005). Aesthetic Realism and Emotional Qualities of Music. British Journal of Aesthetics 45 (2):111-122.
    Roger Scruton appears to have been the first to argue for and articulate an anti-realist theory of aesthetic properties. In the case of emotional qualities of music, his principal argument against realism is unsound and cannot, I believe, be repaired. Nevertheless an anti-realist view of emotional qualities of music is in my view correct and I defend Scruton's insight against a rival realist conception. However, I prefer a rather different form of anti-realism to Scruton's.
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  20. Malcolm Budd (1989). Music and the Communication of Emotion. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 47 (2):129-138.
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  21. Malcolm Budd (1987). Motion and Emotion in Music: A Reply. British Journal of Aesthetics 27 (1):51-54.
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  22. Malcolm Budd (1985). Music and the Emotions: The Philosophical Theories. Routledge & Kegan Paul.
    The most fundamental debate in the philosophy of music involves the question of whether there is an artistically important connection between music and the ...
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  23. Malcolm Budd (1983). Motion and Emotion in Music: How Music Sounds. British Journal of Aesthetics 23 (3):209-221.
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  24. Malcolm Budd (1980). The Repudiation of Emotion: Hanslick on Music. British Journal of Aesthetics 20 (1):29-43.
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  25. David Carr (2004). Music, Meaning, and Emotion. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 62 (3):225–234.
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  26. Tom Cochrane (2009). Joint Attention to Music. British Journal of Aesthetics 49 (1):59-73.
    This paper contrasts individual and collective listening to music, with particular regard to the expressive qualities of music. In the first half of the paper a general model of joint attention is introduced. According to this model, perceiving together modifies the intrinsic structure of the perceptual task, and encourages a convergence of responses to a greater or lesser degree. The model is then applied to music, looking first at the silent listening situation typical to the classical concert hall, and second (...)
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  27. Tom Cochrane (2010). A Simulation Theory of Musical Expressivity. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 88 (2):191-207.
    This paper examines the causal basis of our ability to attribute emotions to music, developing and synthesizing the existing arousal, resemblance and persona theories of musical expressivity to do so. The principal claim is that music hijacks the simulation mechanism of the brain, a mechanism which has evolved to detect one's own and other people's emotions.
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  28. Tom Cochrane (2010). Music, Emotions and the Influence of the Cognitive Sciences. Philosophy Compass 5 (11):978-988.
    This article reviews some of the ways in which philosophical problems concerning music can be informed by approaches from the cognitive sciences (principally psychology and neuroscience). Focusing on the issues of musical expressiveness and the arousal of emotions by music, the key philosophical problems and their alternative solutions are outlined. There is room for optimism that while current experimental data does not always unambiguously satisfy philosophical scrutiny, it can potentially support one theory over another, and in some cases allow us (...)
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  29. Tom Cochrane (2010). Using the Persona to Express Complex Emotions in Music. Music Analysis 29 (1-3):264-275.
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  30. Tom Cochrane (2008). Expression and Extended Cognition. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 66 (4):59-73.
    I argue for the possibility of an extremely intimate connection between the emotional content of the music and the emotional state of the person who produces that music. Under certain specified conditions, the music may not just influence, but also partially constitute the musician’s emotional state.
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  31. David E. Cooper (2009). Music, Education, and the Emotions. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 36 (4):642-652.
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  32. S. Davies (2003). Philosophy, Music and Emotion. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 81 (2):281-283.
    Book Information Philosophy, Music and Emotion. By Geoffrey Madell. Edinburgh University Press. Edinburgh. 2002. Pp. vii + 162. £40.
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  33. S. Davies (1980). The Expression of Emotion in Music. Mind 89 (353):67-86.
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  34. Stephen Davies (2011). Infectious Music: Music-Listener Emotional Contagion. In Amy Coplan & Peter Goldie (eds.), Empathy: Philosophical and Psychological Perspectives. Oxford University Press.
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  35. Stephen Davies (2006). Artistic Expression and the Hard Case of Pure Music. In Matthew Kieran (ed.), Contemporary debates in aesthetics and the philosophy of art. Blackwell Publishing.
    In its narrative, dramatic, and representational genres, art regularly depicts contexts for human emotions and their expressions. It is not surprising, then, that these artforms are often about emotional experiences and displays, and that they are also concerned with the expression of emotion. What is more interesting is that abstract art genres may also include examples that are highly expressive of human emotion. Pure music – that is, stand-alone music played on musical instruments excluding the human voice, and without words, (...)
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  36. Stephen Davies (1983). Is Music a Language of the Emotions? British Journal of Aesthetics 23 (3):222-233.
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  37. M. de Bellis (2010). The Musical Representation: Meaning, Ontology, and Emotion, by Charles O. Nussbaum. Mind 119 (473):225-228.
    (No abstract is available for this citation).
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  38. A. E. Denham (2009). The Future of Tonality. British Journal of Aesthetics 49 (4):427-450.
    Is the tonal ordering of music, and the order of European triadic tonality in particular, the developed manifestation of an essential musical structure—a structure naturally suited to our human capacity to organize sounds musically? Historically and geographically, triadic tonality is a highly local phenomenon, limited to music beginning in the mid-seventeenth century and, until the nineteenth century, almost wholly confined to the Western European musical tradition. Some theorists accordingly regard tonality as a dispensable aesthetic convention—and one which, moreover, has had (...)
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  39. Andreas Dorschel (2012). Einführung zu den Schriften [Richard Wagners]. In Laurenz Lütteken (ed.), Wagner Handbuch. Bärenreiter. 110-117.
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  40. Andreas Dorschel (1997). Utopie und Resignation. Schuberts Deutungen des Sehnsuchtsliedes aus Goethes ‘Wilhelm Meister’ von 1826. Oxford German Studies 26:132-164.
    In the lied, music interprets poetry. Interpretation is not arbitrary. At the same time, there is no such thing as a single correct interpretation of something else – at any rate not of something as complex as a poem by Goethe. Mignon’s song of longing “Nur wer die Sehnsucht kennt, / weiß, was ich leide” can be taken to manifest subjectivity utterly barren within itself. Yet the ability to express that state of mind transcends it; it implies imagination of something (...)
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  41. Andreas Dorschel (1991). Stilisierte Simplizität. Heines ‘Ich stand in dunkeln Träumen’ in Schuberts Komposition. Heine-Jahrbuch 30:164-186.
    Simplicity can be a complicated matter. This has been notorious in the philosophy of science for some time; but it seems the aesthetics of music yet have to come up to that insight. Song, apparently the plainest of musical genres, turns out to be a rather intricate sort of thing once we try to unravel its puzzle of expression as confluence of words and music. Specifically, Franz Schubert’s Ihr Bild, after Heinrich Heine, achieves simplicity through condensation. The idea of gestural (...)
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