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  1. Frederick Ahl, Bonnie Maclachlan & Robert W. Wallace (1991). Harmonia Mundi Musica E Filosofia Nell'antichità = Music and Philosophy in the Ancient World. Edizioni Dell'ateneo.
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  2. Gerhard Albersheim (1964). Mind and Matter in Music. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 22 (3):289-294.
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  3. Meter Amevans (1967). What is Music? Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 26 (2):241-249.
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  4. Charles Avison, Pierre Dubois & William Hayes (2004). Charles Avison's Essay on Musical Expression with Related Writings by William Hayes and Charles Avison. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
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  5. Barbara Ayres (1973). Effects of Infant Carrying Practices on Rhythm in Music. Ethos 1 (4):387-404.
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  6. S. A. Barnett (1899). The Mission of Music. International Journal of Ethics 9 (4):494-504.
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  7. Imants Baruss & M. Wammes (2009). Characteristics of Spontaneous Musical Imagery. Journal of Consciousness Studies 16 (1):37-61.
    This study follows upon Steven Brown's 2006 article in The Journal of Consciousness Studies about the ‘perpetual music track', a form of constant musical imagery. With Brown's assistance, a Musical Imagery Questionnaire was developed. The questionnaire was then administered to 67 participants with the intention of establishing relevant scales for quantifying the presence and extent of spontaneous musical imagery in individuals. In addition to the Musical Imagery Questionnaire, the Six Factor Personality Questionnaire, as well as the Transliminality Scale, which is (...)
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  8. Bruce Baugh (1995). Music for the Young at Heart. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 53 (1):81-83.
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  9. Frances Berenson (1994). Representation and Music. British Journal of Aesthetics 34 (1):60-68.
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  10. Jeanette Bicknell (2001). Music, Listeners, and Moral Awareness. Philosophy Today 45 (3):266-274.
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  11. E. Borthwick (1996). Greek Music and Musicians. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 46 (2):259-261.
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  12. Guy Bouchard (1994). Music and the Emotions. Review of Metaphysics 47 (4):802-803.
  13. Halbert H. Britan (1904). Music and Morality. International Journal of Ethics 15 (1):48-63.
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  14. Halbert Hains Britan (1908). The Power of Music. Journal of Philosophy, Psychology and Scientific Methods 5 (13):352-357.
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  15. Steven Brown (2006). The Perpetual Music Track: The Phenomenon of Constant Musical Imagery. Journal of Consciousness Studies 13 (6):43-62.
    The perpetual music track is a new concept that describes a condition of constant or near-constant musical imagery. This condition appears to be very rare even among composers and musicians. I present here a detailed self-analysis of musical imagery for the purpose of defining the psychological features of a perpetual music track. I have music running through my head almost constantly during waking hours, consisting of a combination of recently-heard pieces and distant pieces that spontaneously pop into the head. (...)
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  16. Malcolm Budd (2012). The Musical Expression of Emotion: Metaphorical-As Versus Imaginative-As Perception. Estetika 49 (2):131-147.
    The paper begins with an overview of various well-known accounts of the musical expression of emotion that have been proposed in recent years. But rather than proceeding to assess the merits and faults of these accounts the paper examines whether a radically new theory by Christopher Peacocke is superior to all of them. The theory, which certainly has a number of attractive features, is based on the idea of metaphorical-as perception. The notion of metaphorical-as perception needs to be elucidated and (...)
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  17. Malcolm Budd (1987). Music and the Emotions. Philosophical Review 96 (4):594-596.
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  18. Bojan Bujic (1975). Aeshetics of Music—Some of its Aims and Limitations. British Journal of Aesthetics 15 (4):329-335.
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  19. Joel Cahen (2008). Tech Art: The Effects of Code and Network Systems on Music and Art. Technoetic Arts: A Journal of Speculative Research 6 (2):185-198.
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  20. Donald Callen (1983). Transfiguring the Emotions in Music. Grazer Philosophische Studien 19:69-91.
    Music often pictures emotion through representing its expression and is thereby able to bear insight into significant aspects of emotional life. Scruton's arguments for denying that music is significantly representational is shown to fail, musical pictures having their own sort of determinacy. Musical representation is dramatic. Musical sounds play the role of expression. They themselves are portrayed as expressing the emotions which we thus represented. But musical drama is distinct from literary drama.
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  21. L. Camilleri (1986). Music, Mind and Programs. Diogenes 34 (133):47-59.
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  22. Robert B. Cantrick (1995). If the Semantics of Music Theorizing is Broke, Let's Fix It. British Journal of Aesthetics 35 (3):239-253.
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  23. Paul Carus (1895). The Significance of Music. The Monist 5 (3):401-407.
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  24. David Casacuberta (2004). DJ El Niño: Expressing Synthetic Emotions with Music. [REVIEW] AI and Society 18 (3):257-263.
    The purpose of this work is twofold: (1) to present an artistic experiment on how to use artificial intelligence to develop a “different kind” of DJ, and (2) to test a cognitive model on how music expresses emotions. Based on a former model conceived by the author, electronic music loops were tagged according to the type and intensity of the expressed emotion. Then, using a feedback model, an artificial personality was arranged, which was affected by the music and played the (...)
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  25. James Mckeen Cattell (1891). On the Origin of Music. Mind 16 (63):375 - 388.
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  26. Tom Cochrane, Bernardino Fantini & Klaus R. Scherer (eds.) (2013). The Emotional Power of Music: Multidisciplinary Perspectives on Musical Arousal, Expression, and Social Control. OUP Oxford.
    How can an abstract sequence of sounds so intensely express emotional states? In the past ten years, research into the topic of music and emotion has flourished. This book explores the relationship between music and emotion, bringing together contributions from psychologists, neuroscientists, musicologists, musicians, and philosophers .
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  27. Dalia Cohen (1995). Directionality and Complexity in Music. In M. G. Boroda (ed.), Units, Text and Language: An Interdisciplinary Approach. Universitätsverlag Dr. N. Brockmeyer.
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  28. Music-Listener Emotional Contagion (2011). Infectious Music. In Amy Coplan & Peter Goldie (eds.), Empathy: Philosophical and Psychological Perspectives. Oxford University Press.
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  29. Susan C. Cook & Judy S. Tsou (1994). Cecilia Reclaimed Feminist Perspectives on Gender and Music. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
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  30. David E. Cooper (2007). Finding the Music Again. The Philosophers' Magazine 38 (38):45-46.
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  31. Ian Cross (2009). Music and Cognitive Evolution. In Robin Dunbar & Louise Barrett (eds.), Oxford Handbook of Evolutionary Psychology. Oup Oxford.
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  32. Jane W. Davidson, Stephanie E. Pitts & Jorge Salgado Correia (forthcoming). Reconciling Technical and Expressive Elements in Musical Instrument Teaching: Working with Children. Journal of Aesthetic Education.
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  33. S. Davies (1987). BUDD, M.: "Music and the Emotions: The Philosophical Theories". [REVIEW] Australasian Journal of Philosophy 65:227.
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  34. Stephen Davies (2012). On Defining Music. The Monist 95 (4):535-555.
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  35. Stephen Davies (1997). Why Listen to Sad Music If It Makes One Feel Sad? In Jenefer Robinson (ed.), Music & Meaning. Cornell University Press.
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  36. E. T. Dixon (1895). On the Difference of Time and Rhythm in Music. Mind 4 (14):236-239.
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  37. Andreas Dorschel (2012). Der Welt abhanden kommen. Über musikalischen Eskapismus. Merkur 66 (2012):135-142.
    Escape from worldly dealings can be sought on a number of routes – music may open one of them. For its matter, sound, is forever fleeting, and in its realm, before and beyond language, no duties and obligations arise. Yet these features are not, as they seem, rooted in the nature of music; rather, they were shaped thus in the history that art underwent in Europe during the 19th century.
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  38. Andreas Dorschel (2011). Individualism for the Masses: Aesthetic Paradox in Mahler’s Symphonic Thought. In Elisabeth Kappel (ed.), The Total Work of Art: Mahler’s Eighth Symphony in Context. Universal Edition. 46-60.
    In his Eighth Symphony Gustav Mahler envisions modern artistic production to steer clear of an alternative emerging at the time: that between popular music on the one hand and esoteric avantgarde music on the other; Mahler’s music is meant to reach the masses, but without descending to audiences’ lowest common denominator. One query through which Mahler’s paradoxical aesthetic vision of an ‘individualism for the masses’ can be explored has been hinted at by the composer himself: Does his integral symphonic work (...)
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  39. Andreas Dorschel (2007). Das anwesend Abwesende: Musik und Erinnerung. In , Resonanzen. Vom Erinnern in der Musik. Universal Edition. 12-29.
    Remembrance is constitutive of music. For music emerges not as an isolated physical stimulus. Rather, it is experienced, i.e., a present musical moment is tied to its temporal antecedents. It is tempting to conceive of remembrance as repetition and as thus opposed to oblivion. Yet to memory selectivity is crucial. What is not selected, falls into oblivion. Hence as we remember we have forgotten already. The present moment evokes remembrance, and exhibits what was then in the light of what is (...)
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  40. Andreas Dorschel (2006). Vom Beginnen. Bruckner und die Wechselfälle des Ursprungs im 19. Jahrhundert. In Hans-Joachim Hinrichsen & Laurenz Lütteken (eds.), Bruckner – Brahms: Urbanes Milieu als kompositorische Lebenswelt im Wien der Gründerzeit. Bärenreiter. 128-143.
    ‚Origin‘ must be counted among the 19th century’s obsessions. Following the lead of 18th century Enlightenment, subverting origins rather than venerating them became a theoretical preoccupation. Yet art – specifically the art of music – dealt with origins in a different way. That way eludes the obvious alternative of either awe or unmasking. It is specifically modern: The work of art attends to its own genesis. The different versions of the beginning of Bruckner’s Fourth Symphony disclose a subtle craft of (...)
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  41. Andreas Dorschel (2005). Was hat Musik im Film zu suchen? In , Tonspuren. Musik im Film: Fallstudien 1994 - 2001. Universal Edition. 12-21.
    Attempts to bestow a musical background upon spoken drama have been deemed widely superfluous; most films, by way of contrast, do employ music. This aesthetic divergence invites an account of film music in terms of lack and compensation. The standard account in such terms, viz. that music has to fill the vacuum of silence, does not explain what it is supposed to explain. Rather, music in cinema can restore in a different way the expression lost as reality is reduced to (...)
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  42. Andreas Dorschel (2004). Erwartung und Vorurteil in der Musik. In , Dem Ohr voraus. Erwartung und Vorurteil in der Musik. Universal Edition. 12-23.
    Art is whatever it is mediated through anticipations of diverse kinds. To the temporal art of music such anticipations are crucial. Composers and performers build up expectations in their musical works and interpretations, thwart them, delay their fulfillment, fulfill them. Some of these expectations arise on the level of chosen genre, others are peculiar to the individual composition. Listeners, correspondingly, may adjust their expectations or, alternatively, attempt to uphold them at any price, turning them into prejudices. And, as anything in (...)
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  43. Andreas Dorschel (2004). Vom Genießen. Reflexionen zu Richard Strauss. In , Gemurmel unterhalb des Rauschens. Theodor W. Adorno und Richard Strauss. Universal Edition. 23-37.
    The work of Richard Strauss has been disparaged as a music designed to be relished (“Genußmusik” was Adorno’s term), lacking any dimension of ‘transcendence’. The notion of ‘relish’ or ‘pleasure’ (“Genuß”), used for characterization rather than disparagement, can disclose crucial aspects of Strauss’s art, though it does not exhaust it. To oppose ‘relish’ or ‘pleasure’ (“Genuß”) to ‘transcendence’, however, either uses hidden theological premises or disregards that ‘relish’ or ‘pleasure’ (“Genuß”), bound to be pervious to its object, does transcend towards (...)
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  44. T. Eerola (forthcoming). Ingredients of Emotional Music: An Overview of the Features That Contribute to Emotions in Music. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience. Conference Abstract: Tuning the Brain for Music.
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  45. Leon Felkins, Music.
    My Favorite Music I enjoy the original Country Music, BlueGrass, some Classical and Blues. But so what? Obviously, I would like to promote what I would like to hear (since I am a certified Selfish Person). It is quite annoying that I can find little good music on my radio.
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  46. Cecilia Ferm Thorgersen (forthcoming). Lived Music - Multi-Dimensional Musical Experience : Implications for Music Education. Philosophy of Music Education Review.
    Lived music - multi-dimensional musical experience : Implications for music education.
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  47. Geraldine Finn (1999). Bodies That Sing Mutilation, Morality, and Music. International Studies in Philosophy 31 (1):47-60.
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  48. Alf Gabrielsson (2011). Strong Experiences with Music. In Patrik N. Juslin & John Sloboda (eds.), Handbook of Music and Emotion: Theory, Research, Applications. Oup Oxford.
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  49. Alf Gabrielsson (2011). The Relationship Between Musical Structure and Perceived Expression. In Susan Hallam, Ian Cross & Michael Thaut (eds.), Oxford Handbook of Music Psychology. Oup Oxford.
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  50. Albert Gehring (1911). The Basis of Musical Pleasure, Together with a Consideration of the Opera Problem and the Expression of Emotions in Music. Philosophical Review 20 (4):450-452.
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