This category needs an editor. We encourage you to help if you are qualified.
Volunteer, or read more about what this involves.
Related categories
Siblings:
27 found
Search inside:
(import / add options)   Sort by:
  1. Gerhard Albersheim (1960). The Sense of Space in Tonal and Atonal Music. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 19 (1):17-30.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Eva Alerby & Cecilia Ferm (2005). Learning Music: Embodied Experience in the Life-World. Philosophy of Music Education Review 13 (2):177-185.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Philip Alperson (1980). Musical Time" and Music as an "Art of Time. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 38 (4):407-417.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Philip Alperson & Noël Carroll (2008). Music, Mind, and Morality: Arousing the Body Politic. Journal of Aesthetic Education 42 (1):1-15.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Philip Alperson, B. E. N. Chí & To Ngoc Thanh (2007). The Sounding of the World: Aesthetic Reflections on Traditional Gong Music of Vietnam. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 65 (1):11–20.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. F. G. Asenjo (1966). Polarity and Atonalism. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 25 (1):47-52.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Philip Ball (2010). The Music Instinct: How Music Works and Why We Can't Do Without It. Oxford University Press.
    Now in The Music Instinct , award-winning writer Philip Ball provides the first comprehensive, accessible survey of what is known--and still unknown--about how ...
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Barbara R. Barry (1990). Musical Time: The Sense of Order. Pendragon Press.
    CHAPTER 1 m Defining Factors: Generic and Individual What is time? as long as no one asks me, I know what it is; but if I wish to explain it to an enquirer, ...
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Christopher Bartel (2010). Why Music Moves Us - Jeanette Bicknell. [REVIEW] Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 68 (3):317-319.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Joachim Ernst Berendt (1987). Nada Brahma: The World is Sound: Music and the Landscape of Consciousness. Distributed by Harper & Row.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Meurig Beynon (2011). From Formalism to Experience: A Jamesian Perspective on Music, Computing, and Consciousness. In David Clarke & Eric F. Clarke (eds.), Music and Consciousness: Philosophical, Psychological, and Cultural Perspectives. Oxford University Press.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Paul Boghossian (2007). Explaining Musical Experience. In Kathleen Stock (ed.), Philosophers on Music: Experience, Meaning, and Work. Oxford University Press.
    1. I start with the observation that we often respond to a musical performance with emotion -- even if it is just the performance of a piece of absolute music, unaccompanied by text, title or programme. We can be exhilarated after a Rossini overture brought off with subtlety and panache; somber and melancholy after Furtlanger’s performance of the slow movement of the Eroica. And so forth. These emotions feel like the real thing to me – or anyway very close to (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. Christine A. Brown (2005). Response to Eva Alerby and Cecilia Ferm, "Learning Music: Embodied Experience in the Life-World&Quot. Philosophy of Music Education Review 13 (2):208-210.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. Christine A. Brown (2005). Response to Eva Alerby and Cecilia Ferm, "Learning Music: Embodied Experience in the Life-World&Quot. Philosophy of Music Education Review 13 (2):208-210.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. Mark DeBellis (1991). The Representational Content of Musical Experience. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 51 (June):303-24.
  16. Julian Dodd (2010). Confessions of an Unrepentant Timbral Sonicist. British Journal of Aesthetics 50 (1):33-52.
    Simplifying somewhat, sonicists believe that works of music are individuated purely in terms of how they sound. For them, exact sound-alikes are identical. Stephen Davies, in his ‘Musical Works and Orchestral Colour’ ( BJA 48 (2008), pp. 363–375) took me to task for defending a version of sonicism. In this paper I seek to explain why Davies's objections miss their mark. In the course of the discussion, I make some methodological remarks about the ontology of music.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. Eran Guter (2004). Wittgenstein on Musical Experience and Knowledge. In J. C. Marek & E. M. Reicher (eds.), Experience and Analysis, Contributions to the 27th International Wittgenstein Symposium. Austrian Ludwig Wittgenstein Society.
    Wittgenstein’s thinking on music is intimately linked to core issues in his work on the philosophy of psychology. I argue that inasmuch musical experience exemplifies the kind of grammatical complexity that is indigenous to aspect perception and, in general, to concepts that are based on physiognomy, it is rendered by Wittgenstein as a form of knowledge, namely, knowledge of mankind.
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. Andrew Kania (2009). Musical Recordings. Philosophy Compass 4 (1):22-38.
    In this article, I first consider the metaphysics of musical recordings: their variety, repeatability, and transparency. I then turn to evaluative or aesthetic issues, such as the relative virtues of recordings and live performances, in light of the metaphysical discussion.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. Andrew Kania, The Philosophy of Music. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    This is an overview of analytic philosophy of music. It is in five sections, as follows: 1. What Is Music? 2. Musical Ontology 3. Music and the Emotions 4. Understanding Music 5. Music and Value.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. P. Kerszberg (1999). The Sound of the Life-World. Continental Philosophy Review 32 (2):169-194.
    Husserl's investigations of internal time-consciousness take sound as the primary temporal object. However, in these investigations, the structure of the flux of temporal subjectivity is established to the detriment of the rich tonal content of sound. Just as Husserl has enlarged the significance of the spatial object of mathematical physics to include the historically-sedimented layers of its appearance, so the temporal object will receive additional intelligibility if the rich texture of musical sound is taken into consideration. Particularly useful for this (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. Joel Krueger (2009). Enacting Musical Experience. Journal of Consciousness Studies 16 (2-3):98-123.
    I argue for an enactive account of musical experience — that is, the experience of listening ‘deeply’(i.e., sensitively and under- standingly) to a piece of music. The guiding question is: what do we do when we listen ‘deeply’to music? I argue that these music listening episodes are, in fact, doings. They are instances of active perceiving, robust sensorimotor engagements with and manipulations of sonic structures within musical pieces. Music is thus experiential art, and in Nietzsche’s words, ‘we listen to music (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. Catherine Legg (2002). Review of Naomi Cumming, "The Sonic Self: Musical Subjectivity and Signification&Quot;. [REVIEW] Recherches Semiotiques / Semiotic Inquiry 22 (1-2-3):315-327.
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. David Roden (2010). Sonic Art and the Nature of Sonic Events. Review of Philosophy and Psychology 1 (1):141-156.
    Musicians and theorists such as the radiophonic pioneer Pierre Schaeffer, view the products of new audio technologies as devices whereby the experience of sound can be displaced from its causal origins and achieve new musical or poetic resonances. Accordingly, the listening experience associated with sonic art within this perspective is ‘acousmatic’; the process of sound generation playing no role in the description or understanding of the experience as such. In this paper I shall articulate and defend a position according to (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. Tiger C. Roholt (2013). In Praise of Ambiguity: Musical Subtlety and Merleau-Ponty. Contemporary Aesthetics 11.
    When a jazz, rock, or hip-hop drummer strikes certain notes in each measure slightly late, instead of hearing the degree to which those notes are late, we typically hear the effects of those variations; namely, a groove, the "feel" of a rhythm. Slight variations of pitch function similarly. In this essay, I argue that certain analytic theorists go astray due to their preoccupation with the variations themselves. By invoking Maurice Merleau- Ponty's insights into subtle visual perceptions, and his notion of (...)
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. Tiger C. Roholt (2010). Musical Musical Nuance. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 68 (1):1-10.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. Tiger C. Roholt (2009). Musical Experience, Philosophical Perspectives. In Tim Bayne, Axel Cleeremans & Patrick Wilken (eds.), Oxford Companion to Consciousness. Oxford University Press.
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  27. Nick Zangwill (2010). Scruton's Musical Experiences. Philosophy 85 (1):91-104.
    Roger Scruton’s account of the nature of music and our experience of it foregrounds the imagination. It is a particularly interesting and promising ‘non-realist’ view in the aesthetics of music, in the sense that it does not postulate aesthetic properties of music that we represent in musical experience. In this paper I critically examine both Scruton’s view and his main argument for it.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation