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  1. Bertinetto Alessandro (2012). Paganini Does Not Repeat. Musical Improvisation and the Type/Token Ontology. Teorema: International Journal of Philosophy (3):105-126.
    This paper explores the ontology of musical improvisation (MI). MI, as process in which creative and performing activities are one and the same generative occurrence, is contrasted with the most widespread conceptual resource used in inquiries about music ontology of the Western tradition: the type/token duality (TtD). TtD, which is used for explaining the relationship between musical works (MWs) and performances, does not fit for MI. Nonetheless MI can be ontologically related to MWs. A MW can ensue from MI and (...)
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  2. Philip Alperson (1991). When Composers Have to Be Performers. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 49 (4):369-373.
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  3. Philip Alperson (1984). On Musical Improvisation. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 43 (1):17-29.
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  4. Godfrey Baldacchino (ed.) (2011). Island Songs: A Global Repertoire. Scarecrow Press.
    "Through the close analysis of musical performance and tradition, the scholarly contributiors to Island Songs provide a global review of how island songs, their lyrics, and their singers engage with the challenges of modernity, migration , ...
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  5. Bruce Ellis Benson (2003). The Improvisation of Musical Dialogue: A Phenomenology of Music. Cambridge University Press.
    This book is an important contribution to the philosophy of music. Whereas most books in this field focus on the creation and reproduction of music, Bruce Benson's concern is the phenomenology of music making as an activity. He offers the radical thesis that it is improvisation that is primary in the moment of music making. Succinct and lucid, the book brings together a wide range of musical examples from classical music, jazz, early music and other genres. It offers a rich (...)
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  6. Walter Bernhart & Michael Halliwell (eds.) (2010). Essays on Performativity and on Surveying the Field. Rodopi.
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  7. Lee B. Brown (2000). "Feeling My Way": Jazz Improvisation and its Vicissitudes-a Plea for Imperfection. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 58 (2):113-123.
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  8. Ben Caplan & Carl Matheson (2008). Modality, Individuation, and the Ontology of Art. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 38 (4):491-517.
    In 1988, Michael Nyman composed the score for Peter Greenaway’s film Drowning by Numbers (or did something that we would ordinarily think of as composing that score). We can think of Nyman’s compositional activity as a “generative performance” and of the sound structure that Nyman indicated (or of some other abstract object that is appropriately related to that sound structure) as the product generated by that performance (ix).1 According to one view, Nyman’s score for Drowning by the Numbers—the musical work—is (...)
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  9. Gustavo D. Cardinal (2004). Performing Live: Aesthetic Alternatives for the Ends of Art (Review). Philosophy of Music Education Review 12 (1):89-93.
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  10. Stephen Davies (1991). The Ontology of Musical Works and the Authenticity of Their Performances. Noûs 25 (1):21-41.
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  11. Andreas Dorschel (2015). Ästhetik des Fado. Merkur 69 (2):79-86.
    Fado, the urban folk of Lisbon and Coimbra, is an art of nuances. These nuances music takes from poetry; as ‘sung poetry’ (‘poema cantado’ in Portuguese) fados are not to be equated with ‘songs’ that turn the word into a vehicle – a dominant procedure in, e.g., rock music. Again, ‘voice’ in fado does not so much manifest individual expression; rather it is, as it were, ‘on loan’ from tradition. Keeping some distance from dance, too, fado at the beginning of (...)
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  12. Andreas Dorschel (2013). Aesthetics of Conducting: Expression and Gesture. In Jean Paul Olive & Susanne Kogler (eds.), Expression et geste musical. L'Harmattan 65-73.
    Expression in orchestral music is a matter of conductors rather than orchestras. Why should that be so? The straightforward answer seems to be that expression is bound to the individual self. But, then, does it have to be? Collective expression of, e.g., anger, rage or protest is not at all unusual in the public domain of politics. Our intuition of conductors’ expressive primacy could be salvaged if we were to conceive of orchestras as their instruments. But that will not do. (...)
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  13. Andreas Dorschel (2003). Rettende Interpretation. In Otto Kolleritsch (ed.), Musikalische Produktion und Interpretation. Zur historischen Unaufhebbarkeit einer ästhetischen Konstellation. Universal Edition 199-211.
    Aestheticians in the tradition of Critical Theory have claimed that the or a purpose of musical interpretation is somehow to save or salvage or rescue ("retten") the musical work. What sense, if any, can be made of this claim? The notion of salvage or rescue presupposes the concept of danger. Threats to works of art emerge from two sources: from outside and from inside. Whilst the former problem is only touched upon, the latter is discussed in some detail, using the (...)
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  14. Eran Guter & Inbal Guter (forthcoming). Impurely Musical Make-Believe. In Alexander Bareis & Lene Nordrum (eds.), How to Make-Believe: The Fictional Truths of the Representational Arts. De Gruyter
  15. Garry Hagberg (2002). On Representing Jazz: An Art Form in Need of Understanding. Philosophy and Literature 26 (1):188-198.
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  16. Gary Iseminger (2010). Sonicism and Jazz Improvisation. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 68 (3):297-299.
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  17. Andrew Kania (2009). Musical Recordings. Philosophy Compass 4 (1):22-38.
    In this article, I first consider the metaphysics of musical recordings: their variety, repeatability, and transparency. I then turn to evaluative or aesthetic issues, such as the relative virtues of recordings and live performances, in light of the metaphysical discussion.
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  18. Andrew Kania (2008). Piece for the End of Time: In Defence of Musical Ontology. British Journal of Aesthetics 48 (1):65-79.
    Aaron Ridley has recently attacked the study of musical ontology—an apparently fertile area in the philosophy of music. I argue here that Ridley's arguments are unsound. There are genuinely puzzling ontological questions about music, many of which are closely related to questions of musical value. While it is true that musical ontology must be descriptive of pre-existing musical practices and that some debates, such as that over the creatability of musical works, have little consequence for questions of musical value, none (...)
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  19. Andrew Kania (2008). Works of Music: An Essay in Ontology by Dodd, Julian. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 66 (2):201–203.
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  20. Jerrold Levinson (2011). Music, Art, and Metaphysics. OUP Oxford.
    This is a long-awaited reissue of Jerrold Levinson's 1990 book which gathers together the writings that made him a leading figure in contemporary aesthetics. These highly influential essays are essential reading for debates on the definition of art, the ontology of art, emotional response to art, expression in art, and the nature of art forms.
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  21. Christy Mag Uidhir (2007). Recordings as Performances. British Journal of Aesthetics 47 (3):298-314.
    This article claims that there is no in principle aesthetic difference between a live performance and a recording of that performance, and as such, performance individuation ought to be revised to reflect this. We ought to regard performances as types able to be instantiated both by live performances and by recordings of those performances, or we ought to abandon performances qua aesthetic objects.
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  22. Bence Nanay (2012). Musical Twofoldness. The Monist 95 (4):607-624.
    The concept of twofoldness plays an important role in understanding the aesthetic appreciation of pictures. My claim is that it also plays an important role in understanding the aesthetic appreciation of musical performances. I argue that when we are aesthetically appreciating the performance of a musical work, we are simultaneously attending to both the features of the performed musical work and the features of the token performance we are listening to. This twofold experience explains a number of salient aspects of (...)
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  23. Jonathan A. Neufeld (2014). Musical Ontology: Critical, Not Metaphysical. Contemporary Aesthetics 12.
    The ontology of musical works often sets the boundaries within which evaluation of musical works and performances takes place. Questions of ontology are therefore often taken to be prior to and apart from the evaluative questions considered by either performers as they present works to audiences or an audience’s critical reflection on a performance. In this paper I argue that, while the ontology of musical works may well set the boundaries of legitimate evaluation, ontological questions should not be considered as (...)
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  24. Jonathan A. Neufeld (2012). Critical Performances. Teorema: International Journal of Philosophy (3):89-104.
    Philosophers of music commonly distinguish performative from critical interpretations. I would like to suggest that the distinction between critical and performative interpretations is well captured by an analogy to legal critics and judges. This parallel draws attention to several features of performative interpretation that are typically overlooked, and deemphasizes epistemic problems with performative interpretations that I believe are typically blown out of proportion and ultimately fail to capture interesting features of performative interpretation. There is an important distinction to be made (...)
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  25. Jonathan A. Neufeld (2011). Living the Work: Meditations on a Lark. Journal of Aesthetic Education 45 (1):89-106.
    Imagine that a performer is confronted with the following decision. After working on a piece for several weeks—practicing, analyzing, listening to various recordings, perhaps reading a bit about it—a performer comes to a crossroads. It seems to him that changing a few crucial interrelated passages can generate two very different performative interpretations. One makes the piece sound animated, lively, and interesting; the other makes the piece sound repetitive, flat, and perhaps even boring. While the performer can understand why one would (...)
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  26. Cynthia R. Nielsen (2009). “What Has Coltrane to Do With Mozart: The Dynamism and Built-in Flexibility of Music”. Expositions 3:57-71.
    Although contemporary Western culture and criticism has usually valued composition over improvisation and placed the authority of a musical work with the written text rather than the performer, this essay posits these divisions as too facile to articulate the complex dynamics of making music in any genre or form. Rather it insists that music should be understood as pieces that are created with specific intentions by composers but which possess possibilities of interpretation that can only be brought out through performance.
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  27. Clifton Sanders (2009). Democracy as Music, Music as Democracy. Radical Philosophy Review 12 (1/2):219-239.
    In this paper we argue that there are valuable consonances between democratic theory and music theory, and between democratization and musical performance and enjoyment. We suggest that this connection is not as trite as it may first appear, but that, since democracy is learned and practiced in a myriad ofways, music is one such place to learn democratic citizenship. The paper begins with a normative account of democratic theory that is present in two movements. The first, “foundations,” explicates the essential (...)
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