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  1. Laird Addis (1999). Of Mind and Music. Cornell University Press.
    In this account of the way in which we understand music, Laird Addis explains how sounds can have such profound effects on those listening to them.
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  2. Rita Aiello & John A. Sloboda (eds.) (1994). Musical Perceptions. Oxford University Press.
    Musical Perceptions is a much-needed text that introduces students of both music and psychology to the study of music perception and cognition. Because the book aims to foster a closer interaction between research in the science and the art of music, both psychologists and musicians contribute chapters on a wide range of topics, including the philosophy of music; research in musical performance; perception of melody, tonality, and rhythm; pedagogical issues; language and music; and neural networks. With their unique ability to (...)
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  3. Nicolás Alessandroni & Esteban Etcheverry (2011). Dirección Coral y Técnica Vocal, ¿Un diálogo posible? Reflexiones metodológicas para un trabajo vocal eficiente. European Review of Artistic Studies 3 (2):1-11.
    Hace 60 años el funcionamiento de la voz en tanto instrumento regido por las leyes acústicas e inscripto en el cuerpo humano, y por lo tanto, gobernado por los mecanismos fisiológicos, era un misterio. Hoy en día, gracias a los avances de la ciencia, es posible (y resulta inevitable) presentar la voz desde una perspectiva sólidamente fundamentada. La práctica coral es práctica vocal, y por lo tanto, para el director coral resulta fundamental estar familiarizado con los nuevos conocimientos disponibles en (...)
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  4. Randall Everett Allsup (2005). Hard Times: Philosophy and the Fundamentalist Imagination. Philosophy of Music Education Review 13 (2):139-142.
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  5. Randall Everett Allsup (2005). A Response to Estelle R. Jorgensen, "Four Philosophical Models of the Relationship Between Theory and Practice&Quot. Philosophy of Music Education Review 13 (1):104-108.
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  6. Leo Apostel, Herman Sabbe & Fernand J. Vandamme (eds.) (1986). Reason, Emotion, and Music: Towards a Common Structure for Arts, Sciences, and Philosophies, Based on a Conceptual Framework for the Description of Music. Communication & Cognition.
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  7. H. Appelqvist (2013). Wittgenstein and the Limits of Musical Grammar. British Journal of Aesthetics 53 (3):299-319.
    This paper offers a Kantian reading of Wittgenstein’s later conception of rules. Building on the continuity of Wittgenstein’s comparison between a sentence and a musical theme, the paper argues that central elements of the Kantianism one may find in Wittgenstein’s early philosophy carry over to his mature conception of grammar. Moreover, this Kantian reading offers a novel perspective on the puzzle about the normativity of Wittgenstein’s later notion of rules. It is argued that the normativity of an aesthetic judgement, understood (...)
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  8. Michael W. Apple (2003). Competition, Knowledge, and the Loss of Educational Vision. Philosophy of Music Education Review 11 (1):3-22.
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  9. Anneli Arho (2006). Rethinking Variations of Musical Meaningfulness. Philosophy of Music Education Review 14 (1):55-64.
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  10. Bernadette Baker (2002). Evaluation, Standards, Normalization: Historico-Philosophical Formations and the Conditions of Possibility for Checklist Thought. Philosophy of Music Education Review 10 (2):92-101.
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  11. Andrea Baldini (2014). Historical Formalism in Music: Toward a Philosophical Theory of Musical Form. Contemporary Aesthetics 12:N/A.
    In this paper I begin to fashion a theory of musical form that I call historical formalism. Historical formalism posits that our perception of the formal properties of a musical work is informed by considerations not only of artistic categories but also of the historical, sociopolitical, and cultural circumstances within which that work was composed.
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  12. Daniel Barenboim (2004). Parallels and Paradoxes: Explorations in Music and Society. Vintage Books.
    These free-wheeling, often exhilarating dialogues—which grew out of the acclaimed Carnegie Hall Talks—are an exchange between two of the most prominent figures in contemporary culture: Daniel Barenboim, internationally renowned conductor and pianist, and Edward W. Said, eminent literary critic and impassioned commentator on the Middle East. Barenboim is an Argentinian-Israeli and Said a Palestinian-American; they are also close friends. As they range across music, literature, and society, they open up many fields of inquiry: the importance of a sense of place; (...)
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  13. Christopher Bartel (2015). The Metaphysics of Mash‐Ups. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 73 (3):297-308.
    Accounts of the ontology of musical works seek to uncover what metaphysically speaking a musical work is and how we should identify instances of musical works. In this article, I examine the curious case of the mash-up and seek to address two questions: are mash-ups musical works in their own right and what is the relationship between the mash-up and its source materials? As mash-ups are part of the broader tradition of rock, I situate this discussion within an ontology of (...)
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  14. Alexander Becker & Matthias Vogel (eds.) (2007). Musikalischer Sinn: Beiträge Zu Einer Philosophie der Musik. Suhrkamp.
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  15. Harris M. Berger (2009). Stance: Ideas About Emotion, Style, and Meaning for the Study of Expressive Culture. Wesleyan University Press.
    Locating stance -- Structures of stance in lived experience -- Stance and others, stance and lives -- The social life of stance and the politics of expressive culture.
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  16. Karol Berger, Anthony Newcomb & Reinhold Brinkmann (eds.) (2005). Music and the Aesthetics of Modernity: Essays. Distributed by Harvard University Press.
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  17. Laurence D. Berman (1993). The Musical Image: A Theory of Content. Greenwood Press.
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  18. Meurig Beynon (2011). From Formalism to Experience: A Jamesian Perspective on Music, Computing, and Consciousness. In David Clarke & Eric F. Clarke (eds.), Music and Consciousness: Philosophical, Psychological, and Cultural Perspectives. Oxford University Press
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  19. Christine A. Brown (2005). Response to Eva Alerby and Cecilia Ferm, "Learning Music: Embodied Experience in the Life-World&Quot. Philosophy of Music Education Review 13 (2):208-210.
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  20. Christine A. Brown (2005). Response to Eva Alerby and Cecilia Ferm, "Learning Music: Embodied Experience in the Life-World&Quot. Philosophy of Music Education Review 13 (2):208-210.
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  21. Tom Cochrane (2015). The Music Between Us: Is Music a Universal Language? By Kathleen Marie Higgins. [REVIEW] Mind 124 (496):1288-1292.
  22. Tom Cochrane (2010). Using the Persona to Express Complex Emotions in Music. Music Analysis 29 (1-3):264-275.
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  23. Stephen Davies (1994). Musical Understanding and Musical Kinds. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 52 (1):69-81.
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  24. M. de Bellis (2010). The Musical Representation: Meaning, Ontology, and Emotion, by Charles O. Nussbaum. Mind 119 (473):225-228.
    (No abstract is available for this citation).
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  25. Rafael De Clercq (2007). Melody and Metaphorical Movement. British Journal of Aesthetics 47 (2):156-168.
    In recent issues of this journal, Roger Scruton and Malcolm Budd have debated the question whether hearing a melody in a sequence of sounds necessarily involves an ‘unasserted thought’ about spatial movement. According to Scruton, the answer is ‘yes’; according to Budd, the answer is ‘no’. The conclusion of this paper is that, while Budd may have underestimated the viability of Scruton's thesis in one of its possible interpretations, there is no good reason to assume that the thesis is true. (...)
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  26. Mark DeBellis (1991). The Representational Content of Musical Experience. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 51 (June):303-24.
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  27. A. E. Denham (2009). The Future of Tonality. British Journal of Aesthetics 49 (4):427-450.
    Is the tonal ordering of music, and the order of European triadic tonality in particular, the developed manifestation of an essential musical structure—a structure naturally suited to our human capacity to organize sounds musically? Historically and geographically, triadic tonality is a highly local phenomenon, limited to music beginning in the mid-seventeenth century and, until the nineteenth century, almost wholly confined to the Western European musical tradition. Some theorists accordingly regard tonality as a dispensable aesthetic convention—and one which, moreover, has had (...)
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  28. Andreas Dorschel (ed.) (2004). Dem Ohr voraus. Erwartung und Vorurteil in der Musik. Universal Edition.
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  29. David J. Elliott (2005). Musical Understanding, Musical Works, and Emotional Expression: Implications for Education. Educational Philosophy and Theory 37 (1):93–103.
    What do musicians, critics, and listeners mean when they use emotion‐words to describe a piece of instrumental music? How can ‘pure’ musical sounds ‘express’ emotions such as joyfulness, sadness, anguish, optimism, and anger? Sounds are not living organisms; sounds cannot feel emotions. Yet many people around the world believe they hear emotions in sounds and/or feel the emotions expressed by musical patterns. Is there a reasonable explanation for this dilemma? These issues gain additional importance when we ask them in the (...)
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  30. Eran Guter (forthcoming). Wittgenstein on Musical Depth and Our Knowledge of Humankind. In Garry L. Hagberg (ed.), Wittgenstein on Aesthetic Understanding. Palgrave Macmillan
    Wittgenstein’s later remarks on music, those written after his return to Cambridge in 1929 in increasing intensity, frequency, and elaboration, occupy a unique place in the annals of the philosophy of music, which is rarely acknowledged or discussed in the scholarly literature. These remarks reflect and emulate the spirit and subject matter of Romantic thinking about music, but also respond to it critically, while at the same time they interweave into Wittgenstein’s forward thinking about the philosophic entanglements of language and (...)
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  31. Eran Guter (2016). Wittgenstein Reimagines Musical Depth. In Stefan Majetschak Anja Weiberg (ed.), Aesthetics Today: Contemporary Approaches to the Aesthetics of Nature and of Art, Contributions to the 39th International Wittgenstein Symposium (Kirchberg am Wechsel: ALWS, 2016). 87-89.
    I explore and outline Wittgenstein's original response to the Romantic discourse concerning musical depth, from his middle-period on. Schopenhauer and Spengler served as immediate sources for Wittgenstein's reliance on Romantic metaphors of depth concerning music. The onset for his philosophic intervention in the discourse was his critique of Schenker's view of music and his general shift toward the 'anthropological view', which occurred at the same time. In his post-PI period Wittgenstein was able to reimagine musical depth in terms of vertically (...)
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  32. Eran Guter (2004). Wittgenstein on Musical Experience and Knowledge. In J. C. Marek & E. M. Reicher (eds.), Experience and Analysis, Contributions to the 27th International Wittgenstein Symposium. Austrian Ludwig Wittgenstein Society
    Wittgenstein’s thinking on music is intimately linked to core issues in his work on the philosophy of psychology. I argue that inasmuch musical experience exemplifies the kind of grammatical complexity that is indigenous to aspect perception and, in general, to concepts that are based on physiognomy, it is rendered by Wittgenstein as a form of knowledge, namely, knowledge of mankind.
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  33. Eran Guter & Inbal Guter (2015). Impurely Musical Make-Believe. In Alexander Bareis & Lene Nordrum (eds.), How to Make-Believe: The Fictional Truths of the Representational Arts. De Gruyter 283-306.
    In this study we offer a new way of applying Kendall Walton’s theory of make-believe to musical experiences in terms of psychologically inhibited games of make-believe, which Walton attributes chiefly to ornamental representations. Reading Walton’s theory somewhat against the grain, and supplementing our discussion with a set of instructive examples, we argue that there is clear theoretical gain in explaining certain important aspects of composition and performance in terms of psychologically inhibited games of make-believe consisting of two interlaced game-worlds. Such (...)
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  34. A. Hamilton (2005). Review: New Essays On Musical Understanding. [REVIEW] Mind 114 (453):169-173.
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  35. Erkki Huovinen (2008). Levels and Kinds of Listeners' Musical Understanding. British Journal of Aesthetics 48 (3):315-337.
    This article examines an account of the listener's musical understanding put forward by Stephen Davies. I begin by discussing Davies's "expressibility requirement", according to which a musical listener should be able to express his understanding in sentences that are truth-apt. This is followed by a reconstruction of Davies's argument for the idea that high levels of musical understanding can be attained without possessing music-theoretical concepts. Such a conclusion is seen to follow from his belief that although musical understandings may be (...)
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  36. Andrew Kania, The Philosophy of Music. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    This is an overview of analytic philosophy of music. It is in five sections, as follows: 1. What Is Music? 2. Musical Ontology 3. Music and the Emotions 4. Understanding Music 5. Music and Value.
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  37. Luke Kersten (2015). Music and Cognitive Extension. Empirical Musicology Review:193-202.
    Extended cognition holds that cognitive processes sometimes leak into the world (Dawson, 2013). A recent trend among proponents of extended cognition has been to put pressure on phenomena thought to be safe havens for internalists (Sneddon, 2011; Wilson, 2010; Wilson & Lenart, 2014). This paper attempts to continue this trend by arguing that music perception is an extended phenomenon. It is claimed that because music perception involves the detection of musical invariants within an “acoustic array”, the interaction between the auditory (...)
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  38. Luke Kersten (2015). Music and Cognitive Extension. Empirical Musicology Review:193-202.
    Extended cognition holds that cognitive processes sometimes leak into the world (Dawson, 2013). A recent trend among proponents of extended cognition has been to put pressure on phenomena thought to be safe havens for internalists (Sneddon, 2011; Wilson, 2010; Wilson & Lenart, 2014). This paper attempts to continue this trend by arguing that music perception is an extended phenomenon. It is claimed that because music perception involves the detection of musical invariants within an “acoustic array”, the interaction between the auditory (...)
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  39. Peter Kivy (2001). New Essays on Musical Understanding. Clarendon.
    Peter Kivy presents a selection of his new and recent writings on the philosophy of music--an area to which he has been one of the most eminent contributors. In his distinctively elegant and informal style, Kivy explores such topics as musicology and its history, the nature of musical works, and the role of emotion in music, and does so in a way that will attract the interest of philosophical and musical readers alike. Most works are published here for the first (...)
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  40. Peter Kivy (1990). Music Alone: Philosophical Reflections on the Purely Musical Experience. Cornell University Press.
    In the Essai sur Vorigine des langues (), Jean-Jacques Rousseau reports on an eighteenth-century curiosity that has, from time to time, fascinated musicians ...
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  41. Constantijn Koopman (2002). New Essays on Musical Understanding. British Journal of Aesthetics 42 (4):428-430.
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  42. Joel Krueger (2013). Empathy, Enaction, and Shared Musical Experience. In Tom Cochrane, Bernardino Fantini & Klaus Scherer (eds.), The Emotional Power of Music: Multidisciplinary Perspectives on Musical Expression, Arousal and Social Control. Oxford University Press 177-196.
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  43. Joel Krueger (2011). Doing Things with Music. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 10 (1):1-22.
    This paper is an exploration of how we do things with music—that is, the way that we use music as an esthetic technology to enact micro-practices of emotion regulation, communicative expression, identity construction, and interpersonal coordination that drive core aspects of our emotional and social existence. The main thesis is: from birth, music is directly perceived as an affordance-laden structure. Music, I argue, affords a sonic world, an exploratory space or nested acoustic environment that further affords possibilities for, among other (...)
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  44. Catherine Legg (2002). Review of Naomi Cumming, "The Sonic Self: Musical Subjectivity and Signification". [REVIEW] Recherches Semiotiques / Semiotic Inquiry 22 (1-2-3):315-327.
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  45. Eldonna L. May (2014). Interpretation. In William Forde Thompson (ed.), Music in the Social and Behavioral Sciences: An Encyclopedia. Sage
  46. Eldonna L. May & Dustin Garlitz (2014). Interpretation. In William Forde Thompson (ed.), Music in the Social and Behavioral Sciences: An Encyclopedia. Sage
  47. Eldonna L. May & Dustin Garlitz (2014). Interpretation. In William Forde Thompson (ed.), Music in the Social and Behavioral Sciences: An Encyclopedia. Sage
  48. Thomas J. Mulherin (2015). "Where Nature Will Speak to Them in Sacred Sounds" : Music and Transcendence in E.T.A. Hoffmann. In Férdia Stone-Davis (ed.), Music and Transcendence. Ashgate 159-176.
  49. Brandon E. Polite (2010). A Correspondence Theory of Musical Representation. Dissertation, University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign
    This dissertation defends the place of representation in music. Music’s status as a representational art has been hotly debated since the War of the Romantics, which pitted the Weimar progressives (Liszt, Wagner, &co.) against the Leipzig conservatives (the Schumanns, Brahms, &co.) in an intellectual struggle for what each side took to be the very future of music as an art. I side with the progressives, and argue that music can be and often is a representational medium. Correspondence (or resemblance) theories (...)
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  50. Adriana Renero (2009). Experience and Consciousness: Enhancing the Notion of Musical Understanding. Critica 41 (121):23 - 46.
    Disagreeing with Jerrold Levinson's claim that being conscious of broad-span musical form is not essential to understanding music, I will argue that our awareness of musical architecture is significant to achieve comprehension. I will show that the experiential model is not incompatible with the analytic model. My main goal is to show that these two models can be reconciled through the identification of a broader notion of understanding. After accomplishing this reconciliation by means of my new conception, I will close (...)
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