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  1. Catherine Allamel-Raffin (2011). The Meaning of a Scientific Image: Case Study in Nanoscience a Semiotic Approach. [REVIEW] NanoEthics 5 (2):165-173.
    This paper proposes a new approach for analysing daily activities in a laboratory. The case study presented is an analysis of shop-talk around a microscope. In addition to the classical approaches, such as ethnomethodology and anthropology of science, I argue that a microsemiotic approach could be useful to better understand what is at stake. The semiotic approach I shall use here was proposed by a group of Belgian semioticians: Groupe μ. This semiotic approach leads to a constructivist point of view: (...)
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  2. F. Allhoff & P. Lin (eds.) (2008). Nanotechnology and Society: Current and Emerging Ethical Issues. Springer.
    The essays tackle such contentious issues as environmental impact, health dangers, medical benefits, intellectual property, professional code of ethics, privacy ...
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  3. Fritz Allhoff (2009). Risk, Precaution, and Emerging Technologies. Studies in Ethics, Law, and Technology 3 (2).
    This paper explores a framework for thinking about risks inherent in emerging technologies; given uncertainty about the magnitude—or even nature—of those risks, deliberation about those technologies is challenged. §1 develops a conceptual framework for risk, and §2 integrates that conception into cost-benefit analysis. Given uncertainty, we are often pushed toward precautionary approaches, and such approaches are explored in §3. These first three sections are largely literature review, and then a positive argument for how to think about the relationship between risk, (...)
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  4. Fritz Allhoff (2007). On the Autonomy and Justification of Nanoethics. NanoEthics 1 (3):185-210.
    In this paper, I take a critical stance on the emerging field of nanoethics. After an introductory section, “Conceptual Foundations of Nanotechnology” considers the conceptual foundations of nanotechnology, arguing that nanoethics can only be as coherent as nanotechnology itself and then discussing concerns with this latter concept; the conceptual foundations of nanoethics are then explicitly addressed in “Conceptual Foundations of Nanoethics”. “Issues in Nanoethics” considers ethical issues that will be raised through nanotechnology and, in “What’s New?”, it is argued that (...)
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  5. Fritz Allhoff & Patrick Lin (2008). Nanotechnology and Human Enhancement: A Symposium. Nanoethics: The Ethics of Technologies That Converge at the Nanoscale 2:251-327.
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  6. Fritz Allhoff, Patrick Lin, James Moor, John Weckert & Mihail C. Roco (2007). Nanoethics: The Ethical and Social Implications of Nanotechnology. Wiley.
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  7. Fritz Allhoff, Patrick Lin & Daniel Moore (2010). What is Nanotechnology and Why Does It Matter: From Science to Ethics. Wiley-Blackwell.
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  8. Sheri Alpert (2008). Neuroethics and Nanoethics: Do We Risk Ethical Myopia? [REVIEW] Neuroethics 1 (1):55-68.
    In recent years, two distinct trajectories of bioethical inquiry have emerged: neuroethics and nanoethics. The former deals with issues in neuroscience, whereas the latter deals with issues in nanoscience and nanotechnology. In both cases, the ethical inquiries have coalesced in response to rapidly increasing scientific and engineering developments in each field. Both also present major issues for contemplation in bioethics. However, the questions are (1) how different are the ethical issues raised, and (2) is it beneficial for neuroethics and nanoethics (...)
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  9. Nabeel Mahdi Althabhawi & Zinatul Ashiqin Zainol (2013). Patentable Novelty in Nanotechnology Inventions: A Legal Study in Iraq and Malaysia. [REVIEW] NanoEthics 7 (2):121-133.
    Nanotechnology has been facing multiple obstacles related to the applicability of patentability criteria. In this article, the authors addressed the novelty requirement in nanotechnology inventions in Iraqi and Malaysian patent acts. First, novelty was discussed to determine its applicability in the field of nanotechnology. Then, problems on nanotechnology patent application were presented along with some suggested solutions. The problems encountered in the patentability of nanotechnology inventions were summarized in two categories. First, the multidisciplinary nature of nanotechnology casts its shadow on (...)
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  10. Heidrun Åm (2014). Quibbling and the Fallacy of Critical Scholarship: Response to Thorstensen. NanoEthics 8 (3):251-254.
    In this text, I respond to a paper by Erik Thorstensen entitled “Public Involvement and Narrative Fallacies of Nanotechnologies.” In his paper, Thorstensen critically reviews a previous ELSA project on engagement and nanotechnology known by the acronym DEEPEN. While I agree that the ELSA community could benefit from the critical examination of earlier research, I believe the approach taken by Thorstensen is not a constructive one. My response deals with three main issues: the character of the paper, narrative theory, and (...)
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  11. Heidrun Åm (2011). Trust as Glue in Nanotechnology Governance Networks. NanoEthics 5 (1):115-128.
    This paper reflects on the change of relations among participants in nanotechnology governance through their participation in governance processes such as stakeholder dialogues. I show that policymaking in practice—that is, the practice of coming and working together in such stakeholder dialogues—has the potential for two-fold performative effects: it can contribute to the development of trust and mutual responsibility on the part of the involved actors, and it may bring about effects on the formation of boundaries of what is sayable and (...)
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  12. Heidrun Åm (2011). Trust as Glue in Nanotechnology Governance Networks. NanoEthics 5 (1):115-128.
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  13. Trond Åm (2011). Trust in Nanotechnology? On Trust as Analytical Tool in Social Research on Emerging Technologies. NanoEthics 5 (1):15-28.
    Trust has become an important aspect of evaluating the relationship between lay public and technology implementation. Experiences have shown that a focus on trust provides a richer understanding of reasons for backlashes of technology in society than a mere focus of public understanding of risks and science communication. Therefore, trust is also widely used as a key concept for understanding and predicting trust or distrust in emerging technologies. But whereas trust broadens the scope for understanding established technologies with well-defined questions (...)
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  14. Trond Grønli Åm (2011). Trust in Nanotechnology? On Trust as Analytical Tool in Social Research on Emerging Technologies. NanoEthics 5 (1):15-28.
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  15. Simone Arnaldi & Alessia Muratorio (2013). Nanotechnology, Uncertainty and Regulation. A Guest Editorial. NanoEthics 7 (3):173-175.
    Nanotechnology has been established as a priority research and policy focus, cutting across several R&D fields from pharmaceutics, food and electronics. The raise of nanotechnologies has been accompanied by an enduring uncertainty characterising the developments of the scientific knowledge related to this field, as well as the social trajectories of technological applications. Such a condition inevitably affects regulatory responses to such technologies, their development and their uses. This special issue addresses this junction between uncertainty and regulation. With no ambition of (...)
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  16. Simone Arnaldi & Mariassunta Piccinni (2009). Nanotechnologies and Equal Access to Healthcare. Studies in Ethics, Law, and Technology 3 (3).
    This editorial introduces a collection of articles that is a collaborative effort to discuss the impact of nanotechnology-based innovation on biomedical products development, on public health infrastructure, and on healthcare service delivery. The goal of this special issue of Studies in Ethics, Law, and Technology is to assess the effects of these transformations on the equity of access to healthcare, on the potential and actual disparities, especially at the international level, as well as to examine the possible strategies to make (...)
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  17. Peter Attia (2013). Mega-Sized Concerns From the Nano-Sized World: The Intersection of Nano- and Environmental Ethics. Science and Engineering Ethics 19 (3):1007-1016.
    As rapid advances in nanotechnology are made, we must set guidelines to balance the interests of both human beneficiaries and the environment by combining nanoethics and environmental ethics. In this paper, I reject Leopoldian holism as a practical environmental ethic with which to gauge nanotechnologies because, as a nonanthropocentric ethic, it does not value the humans who will actually use the ethic. Weak anthropocentrism is suggested as a reasonable alternative to ethics without a substantial human interest, as it treats nonhuman (...)
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  18. Fabio Bacchini (2013). Is Nanotechnology Giving Rise to New Ethical Problems? NanoEthics 7 (2):107-119.
    In this paper I focus on the question of whether nanotechnology is giving rise to new ethical problems rather than merely to new instances of old ethical problems. Firstly, I demonstrate how important it is to make a general distinction between new ethical problems and new instances of old problems. Secondly, I propose one possible way of interpreting the distinction and offer a definition of a “new ethical problem”. Thirdly, I examine whether there is good reason to claim that nanotechnology (...)
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  19. Maria Baghramian (1990). Ethical Issues in the Psychotherapies. Philosophical Books 31 (2):107-108.
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  20. William Sims Bainbridge, Nanotechnology: Societal Implications—Individual Perspectives.
    Managing the Nanotechnology Revolution: Consider the Malcolm Baldrige National Quality Criteria.................................................................................. 24..
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  21. D. Baird (2004). Dissolution of the Nature-Technology Dichotomy? Perspectives From an Everyday Understanding of Nature on Nanotechnology. In Baird D. (ed.), Discovering the Nanoscale. Ios. 209.
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  22. Balamuralithara Balakrishnan, Pek Hoon Er & Punita Visvanathan (2013). Socio-Ethical Education in Nanotechnology Engineering Programmes: A Case Study in Malaysia. [REVIEW] Science and Engineering Ethics 19 (3):1341-1355.
    The unique properties of nanotechnology have made nanotechnology education and its related subjects increasingly important not only for students but for mankind at large. This particular technology brings educators to work together to prepare and produce competent engineers and scientists for this field. One of the key challenges in nanotechnology engineering is to produce graduate students who are not only competent in technical knowledge but possess the necessary attitude and awareness toward the social and ethical issues related to nanotechnology. In (...)
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  23. Philip Ball (2010). Making Life: A Comment on 'Playing God in Frankenstein's Footsteps: Synthetic Biology and the Meaning of Life' by Henk van den Belt (2009). NanoEthics 4 (2):129-132.
    Van den Belt recently examined the notion that synthetic biology and the creation of ‘artificial’ organisms are examples of scientists ‘playing God’. Here I respond to some of the issues he raises, including some of his comments on my previous discussions of the value of the term ‘life’ as a scientific concept.
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  24. Nael Barakat & Heidi Jiao (2010). Proposed Strategies for Teaching Ethics of Nanotechnology. NanoEthics 4 (3):221-228.
    Nanotechnology and nanosciences have recently gained tremendous attention and funding, from multiple entities and directions. In the last 10 years the funding for nanotechnology research has increased by orders of magnitude. An important part that has also gained parallel attention is the societal and ethical impact of nanotechnology and the possible consequences of its products and processes on human life and welfare. Multiple thinkers and philosophers wrote about both negative and positive effects of nanotechnology on humans and societies. The literature (...)
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  25. Gerhold K. Becker (1996). Changing Nature's Course: The Ethical Challenge of Biotechnology. Columbia University Press.
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  26. Jean-Pierre Béland, Johane Patenaude, Georges Legault, Patrick Boissy & Monelle Parent (2011). The Social and Ethical Acceptability of NBICs for Purposes of Human Enhancement: Why Does the Debate Remain Mired in Impasse? [REVIEW] NanoEthics 5 (3):295-307.
    The emergence and development of convergent technologies for the purpose of improving human performance, including nanotechnology, biotechnology, information sciences, and cognitive science (NBICs), open up new horizons in the debates and moral arguments that must be engaged by philosophers who hope to take seriously the question of the ethical and social acceptability of these technologies. This article advances an analysis of the factors that contribute to confusion and discord on the topic, in order to help in understanding why arguments that (...)
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  27. Bernadette Bensaude-Vincent (2012). Nanotechnology: A New Regime for the Public in Science? Scientiae Studia 10 (SPE):85-94.
    "Public engagement in science" is one of the buzzwords that, since 2000, has been used in nanotechnology programs. To what extent does public engagement disrupt the traditional relations between science and the public? This paper briefly contrasts the traditional model of science communication - the diffusionist model - that prevailed in the twentieth century and the new model - the participatory model - that tends to prevail nowadays. Then it will try to disentangle the assumptions underlying the public dialogue initiated (...)
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  28. Bernadette Bensaude-Vincent (2009). Self-Assembly, Self-Organization: Nanotechnology and Vitalism. [REVIEW] NanoEthics 3 (1):31-42.
    Over the past decades, self-assembly has attracted a lot of research attention and transformed the relations between chemistry, materials science and biology. The paper explores the impact of the current interest in self-assembly techniques on the traditional debate over the nature of life. The first section describes three different research programs of self-assembly in nanotechnology in order to characterize their metaphysical implications: (1) Hybridization (using the building blocks of living systems for making devices and machines) ; (2) Biomimetics (making artifacts (...)
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  29. Bernadette Bensaude-Vincent (2007). Nanobots and Nanotubes: Two Alternative Biomimetic Paradigms of Nanotechnology. In Jessica Riskin (ed.), Genesis Redux: Essays in the History and Philosophy of Artificial Life. University of Chicago Press. 221--236.
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  30. Francois Berger, Sjef Gevers, Ludwig Siep & Klaus-Michael Weltring (2008). Ethical, Legal and Social Aspects of Brain-Implants Using Nano-Scale Materials and Techniques. NanoEthics 2 (3):241-249.
    Nanotechnology is an important platform technology which will add new features like improved biocompatibility, smaller size, and more sophisticated electronics to neuro-implants improving their therapeutic potential. Especially in view of possible advantages for patients, research and development of nanotechnologically improved neuro implants is a moral obligation. However, the development of brain implants by itself touches many ethical, social and legal issues, which also apply in a specific way to devices enabled or improved by nanotechnology. For researchers developing nanotechnology such issues (...)
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  31. Rosalyn W. Berne (2006). Nanotalk: Conversations with Scientists and Engineers About Ethics, Meaning, and Belief in the Development of Nanotechnology. Lawrence Erlbaum.
    No one really knows where nanotechnology is leading, what its pursuit will mean, and how it may affect human and other forms of life. Nevertheless, its research and development are moving briskly into that unknown. It has been suggested that rapid movement towards 'who knows where' is endemic to all technological development; that its researchers pursue it for curiosity and enjoyment, without knowing the consequences, believing that their efforts will be beneficial. Further, that the enthusiasm for development comes with no (...)
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  32. Rosalyn W. Berne (2004). Towards the Conscientious Development of Ethical Nanotechnology. Science and Engineering Ethics 10 (4):627-638.
    Nanotechnology, the emerging capability of human beings to observe and organize matter at the atomic level, has captured the attention of the federal government, science and engineering communities, and the general public. Some proponents are referring to nanotechnology as “the next technological revolution”. Applications projected for this new evolution in technology span a broad range from the design and fabrication of new membranes, to improved fuel cells, to sophisticated medical prosthesis techniques, to tiny intelligent machines whose impact on humankind is (...)
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  33. Emanuel Bertrand & Bernadette Bensaude-Vincent (2011). Materials Research in France: A Short-Lived National Initiative (1982–1994). Minerva 49 (2):191-214.
    This paper describes the French initiative in materials research against both a national and an international background, in an attempt to disentangle the local circumstances, which prompted this governmental initiative, and to characterize the specific profile of materials research in France. In presenting a biography of the interdisciplinary program in materials research (PIRMAT), we argue that: i) the PIRMAT denotes a failure of the French science policy in materials research; ii) the leadership of the CNRS led to a specific style (...)
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  34. David M. Berube (2004). The Rhetoric of Nanotechnology. In Baird D. (ed.), Discovering the Nanoscale. Ios. 173--192.
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  35. Robert Best & George Khushf (2006). The Social Conditions for Nanomedicine: Disruption, Systems, and Lock-In. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 34 (4):733-740.
    Here we consider two ways that nanomedicine might be disruptive. First, low-end disruptions that are intrinsically unpredictable but limited in scope, and second, high end disruptions that involve broader societal issues but can be anticipated, allowing opportunity for ethical reflection.
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  36. Robert Best, George Khushf & Robin Wilson (2006). A Sympathetic but Critical Assessment of Nanotechnology Initiatives. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 34 (4):655-657.
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  37. Geeta Bharathan, Shanti Chandrashekaran, Tony May & John Bryant (forthcoming). Crop Biotechnology and Developing Countries. Bioethics for Scientists.
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  38. D. Black (2014). An Aesthetics of the Invisible: Nanotechnology and Informatic Matter. Theory, Culture and Society 31 (1):99-121.
    The molecule, as a perfect and ageless building block of matter that exists beyond human reach, has been an object of fascination and admiration since the 19th century. However, the discourse surrounding nanotechnology – at least at its most optimistic – promises the possibility of human mastery over this domain and, as a result, over all matter. This belief carries forward the old idea of a division between a realm of the base, material and particular, on one hand, and a (...)
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  39. Marianne Boenink (2009). Tensions and Opportunities in Convergence: Shifting Concepts of Disease in Emerging Molecular Medicine. [REVIEW] NanoEthics 3 (3):243-255.
    The convergence of biomedical sciences with nanotechnology as well as ICT has created a new wave of biomedical technologies, resulting in visions of a ‘molecular medicine’. Since novel technologies tend to shift concepts of disease and health, this paper investigates how the emerging field of molecular medicine may shift the meaning of ‘disease’ as well as the boundary between health and disease. It gives a brief overview of the development towards and the often very speculative visions of molecular medicine. Subsequently (...)
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  40. Vincent Bontems (2011). How to Accommodate to the Invisible? The 'Halo' of 'Nano'. NanoEthics 5 (2):175-183.
    Nanotechnologies produce many different types of images but are characterized by the ones that allow us to ‘see the atoms’ despite the fact that objects at the nanoscale are smaller than the wavelength of light and hence are ‘invisible’. Images from scanning probe microscopy (SPM), like ‘The Beginning’, have played an emblematic role in the constitution of the field and are also more likely to be used in communication outside the scientific field. These images are made, selected, modified and evaluated (...)
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  41. Nick Bostrom, The World in 2050.
    This essay explores some of the social, political, economic and technological issues that the world may have to face in the mid-21 st century. A central theme is the need to regulate molecular nanotechnology because of its immense abuse potential. Advanced nanotechnology can be used to build small self-replicating machines that can feed on organic matter - a bit like bacteria but much more versatile, and potentially more destructive than the H-bomb. The necessity to prevent irresponsible groups and individuals from (...)
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  42. Diana M. Bowman (2008). Governing Nanotechnologies: Weaving New Regulatory Webs or Patching Up the Old? [REVIEW] NanoEthics 2 (2):179-181.
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  43. Diana M. Bowman (2007). Book Review. [REVIEW] NanoEthics 1 (1):75-76.
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  44. Diana M. Bowman & Graeme A. Hodge (2008). A Big Regulatory Tool-Box for a Small Technology. NanoEthics 2 (2):193-207.
    There is little doubt that the development and commercialisation of nanotechnologies is challenging traditional state-based regulatory regimes. Yet governments currently appear to be taking a non-interventionist approach to directly regulating this emerging technology. This paper argues that a large regulatory toolbox is available for governing this small technology and that as nanotechnologies evolve, many regulatory advances are likely to occur outside of government. It notes the scientific uncertainties facing us as we contemplate nanotechnology regulatory matters and then examines the notion (...)
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  45. Diana M. Bowman & Graeme A. Hodge (2007). Editorial – Governing Nanotechnology: More Than a Small Matter? [REVIEW] NanoEthics 1 (3):239-241.
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  46. Diana M. Bowman, Elen Stokes & Michael G. Bennett (2013). Anticipating the Societal Challenges of Nanotechnologies. NanoEthics 7 (1):1-5.
    “In this article we sketch out the landscape for this Special Issue on anticipating and embedding the societal challenge of nanotechnologies. Tools that actors may choose to employ for these processes are articulated, and further explored through the introduction of the seven articles which comprise this Issue. Taken together, these articles create a cogent narrative on the societal challenges posed by nanotechnologies. They are drawn together by three distinct themes, each of which is briefly considered within this context of this (...)
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  47. Diana M. Bowman & Geert van Calster (2008). Flawless or Fallible? A Review of the Applicability of the European Union's Cosmetics Directive in Relation to Nano-Cosmetics. Studies in Ethics, Law, and Technology 2 (3).
    Consumer demand for new products within the cosmetics and toiletries industry has encouraged the industry increasingly to incorporate and experiment with new products and processes, including nanotechnologies. A number of cosmetic products which claim to incorporate engineered nano-materials have already entered the market and include, for instance, anti-ageing creams, make up, hair care products, cleansers and moisturisers. While the use of engineered nano-materials within cosmetics offers a range of benefits, including increased transparency and solubility, there has been increasing debate over (...)
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  48. Gaylen Bradley (2004). The Ethical Issues. BioScience 54 (4):285.
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  49. Kathy Brady (2011). Freelance Technical Writers: Does Temporary Work Promote Ethical Issues? Journal of Information, Communication and Ethics in Society 9 (1):34-48.
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  50. Lewis M. Branscomb (1992). America's Emerging Technology Policy. Minerva 30 (3):317-336.
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