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  1. Susan E. Babbitt (2006). Reading Across Borders: Storytelling and Knowledges of Resistance (Review). Hypatia 21 (3):203-206.
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  2. Paul Richard Blum (2013). I Felt so Tall Within: Anthroplogy in Slave Narratives. Annals of Cultural Studies (Roczniki Kulturoznawcze) 4 (2):21-39.
  3. David Carr (2008). 1. Narrative Explanation and its Malcontents. History and Theory 47 (1):19–30.
    In this paper I look at narrative as a mode of explanation and at various ways in which the explanatory value of narrative has been criticized. I begin with the roots of narrative explanation in everyday action, experience, and discourse, illustrating it with the help of a simple example. I try to show how narrative explanation is transformed and complicated by circumstances that take us beyond the everyday into such realms as jurisprudence, journalism, and history. I give an account of (...)
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  4. Tamás Demeter (2011). A Touch of the Dramatic. In Josef Steiff (ed.), Sherlock Holmes and Philosophy. Open Court.
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  5. Daniel Dohrn (2009). Counterfactual Narrative Explanation. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 67 (1):37-47.
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  6. S. T. Goh (1970). The Logic of Explanation in Anthropology. Inquiry 13 (1-4):339 – 359.
    This paper is about the problem of explanation in anthropology. There are, broadly speaking, three theories of explanation, namely, the scientific theory, the historical theory, and finally what I have decided to call the phenomenological theory, after M. Natanson. The author argues that none of the three theories is adequate by itself to encompass the complex nature of anthropological science. The three theories correspond roughly to at least three different types of questions raised by anthropologists, and this being the case (...)
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  7. Stefan Lukits (2011). Narrativity and the Symbolic Vacuum. Philosophy and Theology 23 (1):167-183.
    “Narrativity and the Symbolic Vacuum” examines the descriptive and the prescriptive narrativity claim in the context of a claim that there are narratives in the biblical literature that resist both. The descriptive narrativity claim maintains that it is not an option for a person to conceive of their life without narrative coherence. The prescriptive claim holds that narrativity is a necessary condition for a good and successful human life. Phenomenological thought and Aristotelian virtue ethics, expressing a critical stance towards modernity (...)
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  8. Robert J. O'Hara (1998). Narrative in the Historical Sciences: A Working Interdisciplinary Bibliography. SSRN Electronic Journal.
    Models of scientific explanation derived from the physical sciences are often poorly suited to the historical sciences—to the fields William Whewell called the palaetiological sciences. A listing of 27 titles that explore the nature of narrative understanding across a range of scientific disciplines—from cosmology to paleontology to economics—attests to the importance of narrative epistemology in the sciences.
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  9. Robert J. O'Hara (1992). Telling the Tree: Narrative Representation and the Study of Evolutionary History. Biology and Philosophy 7 (2): 135–160.
    Accounts of the evolutionary past have as much in common with works of narrative history as they do with works of science. Awareness of the narrative character of evolutionary writing leads to the discovery of a host of fascinating and hitherto unrecognized problems in the representation of evolutionary history, problems associated with the writing of narrative. These problems include selective attention, narrative perspective, foregrounding and backgrounding, differential resolution, and the establishment of a canon of important events. The narrative aspects of (...)
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  10. Robert J. O'Hara (1988). Homage to Clio, or, Toward an Historical Philosophy for Evolutionary Biology. Systematic Zoology 37 (2): 142–155.
    Discussions of the theory and practice of systematics and evolutionary biology have heretofore revolved around the views of philosophers of science. I reexamine these issues from the different perspective of the philosophy of history. Just as philosophers of history distinguish between chronicle (non-interpretive or non-explanatory writing) and narrative history (interpretive or explanatory writing), I distinguish between evolutionary chronicle (cladograms, broadly construed) and narrative evolutionary history. Systematics is the discipline which estimates the evolutionary chronicle. ¶ Explanations of the events described in (...)
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  11. Seungbae Park (2014). A Pessimistic Induction Against Scientific Antirealism. Organon F 21 (1):3-21.
    There are nine antirealist explanations of the success of science in the literature. I raise difficulties against all of them except the latest one, and then construct a pessimistic induction that the latest one will turn out to be problematic because its eight forerunners turned out to be problematic. This pessimistic induction is on a par with the traditional pessimistic induction that successful present scientific theories will be revealed to be false because successful past scientific theories were revealed to be (...)
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  12. J. David Velleman (2003). Narrative Explanation. Philosophical Review 112 (1):1-25.
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