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  1. Jon Adams (2008). Plot Taxonomies and Intentionality. Philosophy and Literature 32 (1):pp. 102-118.
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  2. Robert Alter (1996). Reading Style in Dickens. Philosophy and Literature 20 (1):130-137.
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  3. Roman Altshuler (2013). Peter Goldie , The Mess Inside: Narrative, Emotion, and the Mind . Reviewed By. [REVIEW] Philosophy in Review 33 (3):189–192.
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  4. James Aucoin (1993). Journalism, Narrative and Community. Professional Ethics 2 (1/2):67-88.
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  5. Idelber Avelar (2004). The Letter of Violence: Essays on Narrative, Ethics, and Politics. Palgrave Macmillan.
    This book traces the theory of violence from nineteenth-century symmetrical warfare through today's warfare of electronics and unbalanced numbers. Surveying such luminaries as Walter Benjamin, Frantz Fanon, Hannah Arendt, Paul Virilio, and Jacques Derrida, Avelar also offers a discussion of theories of torture and confession, the work of Roman Polanski and Borges, and a meditation on the rise of the novel in Colombia.
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  6. Susan E. Babbitt (2006). Reading Across Borders: Storytelling and Knowledges of Resistance (Review). Hypatia 21 (3):203-206.
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  7. Ismay Barwell (1990). Feminine Perspectives and Narrative Points of View. Hypatia 5 (2):63 - 75.
    The search for a unified and coherent feminine aesthetic theory could not be successful because it relies upon "universals" which do not exist and assumes simple parallels among psychological, social and aesthetic structures. However, with an apparatus of narrative points of view, one can demonstrate that individual narrative texts are organized from a feminine point of view. To this extent, the intuition that there is a feminine aesthetic can be vindicated.
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  8. Simon Beck (2006). Fiction and Fictions: On Ricoeur on the Route to the Self. South African Journal of Philosophy 25 (4):329-335.
    In reaching his narrative view of the self in Oneself as Another, Paul Ricoeur argues that, while literature offers revealing insights into the nature of the self, the sort of fictions involving brain transplants, fission, and so on, that philosophers often take seriously do not (and cannot). My paper is a response to Ricoeur's charge, contending that the arguments Ricoeur rejects are not flawed in the way he suggests, and that his own arguments are sometimes guilty of the very charges (...)
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  9. Ilya Bernstein (2008). Temporal Registers in the Realist Novel. Philosophy and Literature 32 (1):pp. 173-182.
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  10. Jeanette Bicknell (2004). Self-Knowledge and the Limitations of Narrative. Philosophy and Literature 28 (2):406-416.
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  11. Jeffrey Bloechl (1998). The Virtue of History: Alasdair Maclntyre and the Rationality of Narrative. Philosophy and Social Criticism 24 (1):43-61.
    Maclntyre's critique of modern moral theory is supported by a theory of narrative in turn premised on a discontinuous reading of history. Thought through to the end, historical discontinuity redefines objectivity according to the rules of the particular context in which it appears. This claim both founds Maclntyre's intervention in moral debate and troubles that intervention from within. Against his opponents, he claims to have the argument most in accord with the rules of our context; Maclntyre's narra tivity is thus (...)
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  12. Wayne Booth (1988). The Company We Keep. University of California Press.
    Wayne C. Booth argues for the relocation of ethics to the center of our engagement with literature.
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  13. Luk Bouckaert & Rita Ghesquiere (2004). Dostoyevsky's Grand Inquisitor as a Mirror for the Ethics of Institutions. Journal of Business Ethics 53 (1-2):29-37.
    The aim of the paper is twofold. On a methodological level we explore the way classic literary texts can be used as a resource for analysis and reflection in the field of business ethics. On the level of substance we use the story of the Grand Inquisitor to analyze the problem of hypocrisy in business ethics and leadership. To overcome the problem of hypocrisy we look for some clues in the work of Dostoyevsky himself.
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  14. Malcolm Bowie (1994). The Morality of Proust: An Inaugural Lecture Delivered Before the University of Oxford on 25 November 1993. Clarendon Press.
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  15. Eva T. H. Brann (1999). Tapestry with Images: Paul Scott's Raj Novels. Philosophy and Literature 23 (1):181-196.
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  16. Hugh Bredin (1982). The Displacement of Character in Narrative Theory. British Journal of Aesthetics 22 (4):291-300.
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  17. Germaine Brée (1974). Camus and Sartre: Crisis and Commitment. Calder and Boyars.
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  18. Gert Buelens (ed.) (1997). Enacting History in Henry James: Narrative, Power, and Ethics. Cambridge University Press.
    The Jamesian mode of writing, it has been claimed, actively works against an understanding of the way truth, history and power circulate in his texts. In this collection of essays, leading scholars of James analyse the strategies James used to address these crucial issues. Enacting History in Henry James claims that, because the type of knowledge available in James's fiction is never of a cognitive kind, the reader can never know 'truth' in any verifiable sense. James's writing instead promises an (...)
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  19. David Carr (2006). Moral Education at the Movies: On the Cinematic Treatment of Morally Significant Story and Narrative. Journal of Moral Education 35 (3):319-333.
    Much contemporary social theory has emphasised the key role that cultural and other narrative plays in any human understanding of moral self and agency. However, in those modern social contexts in which literacy has been widespread, such access to narrative has also been largely via the written word: those significantly educated in cultural heritage have been the primarily well?read. Still, in an age in which communication is most commonly prosecuted through the electronic media of radio, cinema, television and computer, it (...)
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  20. Joseph Carroll (2008). The Cuckoo's History: Human Nature in Wuthering Heights. Philosophy and Literature 32 (2):pp. 241-257.
    Wuthering Heights has proved exceptionally elusive to interpretation. By foregrounding the idea of human nature, Darwinian literary theory provides a framework within which we can assimilate previous insights about Wuthering Heights , delineate the norms Brontë shares with her projected audience, analyze her divided impulses, and explain the generic forms in which those impulses manifest themselves. Brontë herself presupposes a folk understanding of human nature in her audience. Evolutionary psychology converges with that folk understanding but provides explanations that are broader (...)
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  21. Noël Carroll (2007). Narrative Closure. Philosophical Studies 135 (1):1 - 15.
    In this article, “Narrative Closure,” a theory of the nature of narrative closure is developed. Narrative closure is identified as the phenomenological feeling of finality that is generated when all the questions saliently posed by the narrative are answered. The article also includes a discussion of the intelligibility of attributing questions to narratives as well as a discussion of the mechanisms that achieve this. The article concludes by addressing certain recent criticisms of the view of narrative expounded by this article.
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  22. Peter Caws (2000). Moral Certainty in Tolstoy. Philosophy and Literature 24 (1):49-66.
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  23. Evgenia V. Cherkasova (2004). Kant on Free Will and Arbitrariness: A View From Dostoevsky's Underground. Philosophy and Literature 28 (2):367-378.
    Are freedom, rationality, and morality intrinsically connected? Or perhaps freedom's very nature is transgression, going beyond rationality and ethics? These questions are the center of my discussion of free will and arbitrariness in Kant's late writings. Kant's interlocutor here is Dostoevsky's underground man, a passionate proponent of the Russian _volia--("freedom," "unfettered, arbitrary will"). The underground man questions freedom's relationship to rationality and moral law and insists that free will, arbitrariness and even tyranny are inseparable. Finally, in its attack on rational (...)
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  24. Kelly Coble (2005). Authenticity in Robert Musil's. Philosophy and Literature 29 (2).
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  25. Ted Cohen (1997). Metaphor, Feeling, and Narrative. Philosophy and Literature 21 (2):223-244.
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  26. Dorrit Cohn (2000). The Poetics of Plato's. Philosophy and Literature 24 (1).
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  27. Alice Crary (2012). W.G. Sebald and the Ethics of Narrative. Constellations 19 (3):494-508.
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  28. Thomas P. Crocker (2002). An American Novelist in the Philosopher King's Court. Philosophy and Literature 26 (1):57-74.
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  29. Angela Curran (1998). Feminism and the Narrative Structures of Aristotle’s Poetics. In Cynthia Freeland (ed.), Re-Reading the Canon: Feminist Readings on Aristotle. Penn State University Press.
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  30. Gregory Currie (2010). Narratives and Narrators: A Philosophy of Stories. Oxford University Press.
    This text offers a reflection on the nature and significance of narrative in human communication.
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  31. Gregory Currie (2010). Narrative, Imitation, and Point of View. In Garry Hagberg & Walter Jost (eds.), A Companion to the Philosophy of Literature. Wiley-Blackwell.
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  32. Gregory Currie (2007). Both Sides of the Story: Explaining Events in a Narrative. [REVIEW] Philosophical Studies 135 (1):49 - 63.
    Our experience of narrative has an internal and an external aspect--the content of the narrative’s representations, and its intentional, communicative aetiology. The interaction of these two things is crucial to understanding how narrative works. I begin by laying out what I think we can reasonably expect from a narrative by way of causal information, and how causality interacts with other attributes we think of as central to narrative. At a certain point this discussion will strike a problem: our judgements about (...)
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  33. Gregory Currie (2006). Narrative Representation of Causes. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 64 (3):309–316.
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  34. Gregory Currie (2004). Arts and Minds. Oxford University Press.
    Philosophical questions about the arts go naturally with other kinds of questions about them. Art is sometimes said to be an historical concept. But where in our cultural and biological history did art begin? If art is related to play and imagination, do we find any signs of these things in our nonhuman relatives? Sometimes the other questions look like ones the philosopher of art has to answer. Anyone who thinks that interpretation in the arts is an activity that leaves (...)
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  35. Gregory Currie (1995). Unreliability Refigured: Narrative in Literature and Film. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 53 (1):19-29.
    Aims to improve an understanding of the theoretical issues in response to the influence of fiction. Four things in narrative unreliability; Relation between narration in literary fictions and film; Comprehension of narrative essentially a matter of intentional inference; Fictions misdescribed; Asymmetry between literature and film; Ambiguity and unreliability; Implied author and narrator.
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  36. Gregory Currie & Jon Jureidini (2004). Narrative and Coherence. Mind and Language 19 (4):409–427.
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  37. E. M. Dadlez (2008). Form Affects Content: Reading Jane Austen. Philosophy and Literature 32 (2):pp. 315-329.
    What does it mean to hold that the significant aspects of a literary passage cannot be captured in a paraphrase? Does a change in the description of an act "risk producing a different act" from the one described? Using Jane Austen as an example, we'll consider whether her use of metaphor and symbol really amounts to calling someone a prick, whether her narrative voice changes what it is that is expressed, and whether comedy can hold just as much significance (...)
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  38. Alan Dagovitz (2008). Moby-Dick 's Hidden Philosopher: A Second Look at Stubb. Philosophy and Literature 32 (2):pp. 330-346.
    The hard-drinking, joke-cracking second-mate of Melville's Moby Dick doesn't receive much respect from critics. At best Stubb is seen as a comic foil, at worst as a cruel coward and mechanical optimist. Yet this perspective distorts the text and does him an injustice. In fact, Stubb can be read quite fruitfully as an exemplar of wisdom. Using recent scholarship to fill out Melville's conception of fine philosophy, a set of criteria emerges for the true philosopher according to which Stubb fares (...)
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  39. Arthur C. Danto (1991). Narrative and Style. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 49 (3):201-209.
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  40. David Davies (2010). Eluding Wilson's “Elusive Narrators”. Philosophical Studies 147 (3):387 - 394.
    George Wilson has defended the thesis that even impersonal third-person fictional narratives should be taken to contain fictional narrations and have fictional narrators. This, he argues, is necessary if we are to explain how readers can take themselves, in their imaginative engagement with fictions, to have knowledge of the things they are imagining. I argue that there is at least one class of impersonal third-person fictional narratives—thought experiments—to which Wilson’s model fails to apply, and that this reveals more general problems (...)
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  41. Vincent Descombes (1992). Proust: Philosophy of the Novel. Stanford University Press.
    Through the voice of the narrator of Remembrance of Things Past, Proust observes of the painter Elstir that the paintings are bolder than the artist; Elstir the painter is bolder than Elstir the theorist. This book applies the same distinction to Proust; the Proustian novel is bolder than Proust the theorist. By this the author means that the novel is philosophically bolder, that it pursues further The task Proust identifies as the writer's work: to explain life, to elucidate what has (...)
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  42. Mary Devereaux (2004). Moral Judgments and Works of Art: The Case of Narrative Literature. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 62 (1):3–11.
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  43. Lisa J. Disch (1993). More Truth Than Fact: Storytelling as Critical Understanding in the Writings of Hannah Arendt. Political Theory 21 (4):665-694.
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  44. Daniel Dohrn (2009). Counterfactual Narrative Explanation. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 67 (1):37-47.
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  45. Jane Duran (2004). Virginia Woolf, Time, and the Real. Philosophy and Literature 28 (2):300-308.
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  46. Richard A. Dwyer (1976). Boethian Fictions: Narratives in the Medieval French Versions of the Consolatio Philosophiae. Mediaeval Academy of America.
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  47. Laura Rachel Felleman Fattal (2004). The Search for Narrative. Journal of Aesthetic Education 38 (3):107-115.
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  48. Susan L. Feagin (2007). On Noël Carroll on Narrative Closure. Philosophical Studies 135 (1):17 - 25.
    This paper examines various claims by Noël Carroll about narrative closure and its relationship to narrative connections, which are, roughly, causal connections generously conceived to include necessary conditions for sufficient conditions for an effect. I propose supplementing the expanded notion of a cause with Michael Bratman’s notion of a psychological connection to account for the particular role that human agents play in narratives. A novel and a film are used as examples to illustrate how the concept of a psychological connection (...)
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  49. Gary D. Fireman, T. E. McVay & Owen J. Flanagan (eds.) (2003). Narrative and Consciousness: Literature, Psychology and the Brain. Oxford University Press.
    We define our conscious experience by constructing narratives about ourselves and the people with whom we interact. Narrative pervades our lives--conscious experience is not merely linked to the number and variety of personal stories we construct with each other within a cultural frame, but is subsumed by them. The claim, however, that narrative constructions are essential to conscious experience is not useful or informative unless we can also begin to provide a distinct, organized, and empirically consistent explanation for narrative in (...)
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  50. Eitan Fishbane (2002). Tears of Disclosure: The Role of Weeping in Zoharic Narrative. Journal of Jewish Thought and Philosophy 11 (1):25-47.
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