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  1. Hubert G. Alexander (1955). Brandt on Hopi Ethics. Review of Metaphysics 9 (1):106 - 111.
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  2. Thomas Alexander (1996). The Fourth World of American Philosophy: The Philosophical Significance of Native American Culture. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 32 (3):375 - 402.
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  3. Paula Gunn Allen (2007). American Indian Indigenous Pedagogy. In Sharan B. Merriam (ed.), Non-Western Perspectives on Learning and Knowing. Krieger Pub. Co..
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  4. Philip Alperson (ed.) (2002). Diversity and Community: An Interdisciplinary Reader. Blackwell Pub..
  5. Guillaume Ansart (2000). Imaginary Encounters with the New World: Native American Utopias in 18th-Century French Novels. Utopian Studies 11 (2):33 - 41.
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  6. Annette Arkeketa (2003). Poetry: Too Much for the Average Indian. Hypatia 18 (2):133-151.
  7. Barbara Arneil (1996). John Locke and America: The Defence of English Colonialism. Oxford Unioversity Press.
    This book considers the context of the colonial policies of Britain, Locke's contribution to them, and the importance of these ideas in his theory of property. It also reconsiders the debate about John Locke's influence in America. The book argues that Locke's theory of property must be understood in connection with the philosopher's political concerns, as part of his endeavour to justify the colonialist policies of Lord Shaftesbury's cabinet, with which he was personally associated. The author maintains that traditional scholarship (...)
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  8. Stephen Beckerman (2005). Sociosexual Strategies in Tribes and Nations. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 28 (2):277-278.
    Extending the findings of this work: Tribal peoples need study. Monogamy as marital institution and monogamy as sociosexual orientation must be separated. Sociosexuality must be considered as an aspect of somatic as well as reproductive effort; third-party interventions in sociosexuality need attention; and multiple sociosexual orientations, with frequency-dependent fitness payoffs equal at equilibrium, need to be modeled.
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  9. A. L. Benedict (1901). Has the Indian Been Misjudged?-A Study of Indian Character. International Journal of Ethics 12 (1):99-113.
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  10. Eno Beuchelt (1974). The Civilizations of North American Eskimos and Indians. Philosophy and History 7 (2):217-218.
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  11. Tonia Bock (2006). A Consideration of Culture in Moral Theme Comprehension: Comparing Native and European American Students. Journal of Moral Education 35 (1):71-87.
    The use of stories to teach character is popular among educators, yet little is known about student comprehension of these stories. An important factor that may influence comprehension of stories and story themes is culture. The purpose of this study was to examine the extent to which students from a Native American culture understand European?based stories in the same way as European American children. Native and European American students in Grade 4?8 (ages 10?18) read eight short stories depicting eight different (...)
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  12. Annie L. Booth & Harvey L. Jacobs (1990). Ties That Bind: Native American Beliefs as a Foundation for Environmental Consciousness. Environmental Ethics 12 (1):27-43.
    In this article we examine the specific contributions Native American thought can make to the ongoing search for a Western ecological consciousness. We begin with a review of the influence of Native American beliefs on the different branches of the modem environmental movement and some initial comparisons of Western and Native American ways of seeing. We then review Native American thought on the natural world, highlighting beliefs in the need for reciprocity and balance, the world as a living being, and (...)
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  13. Andrea Boyea (forthcoming). Teaching Native American Music with Story for Multicultural Ends. Philosophy of Music Education Review.
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  14. William C. Bradford (2006). Acknowledging and Rectifying the Genocide of American Indians: "Why is It That They Carry Their Lives on Their Fingernails?". Metaphilosophy 37 (3-4):515–543.
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  15. Gordon Brotherston (2001). Native Numeracy in Tropical America. Social Epistemology 15 (4):299 – 317.
  16. Katy Gray Brown (2003). Book Review: Shari M. Huhndorf. Going Native: Indians in the American Cultural Imagination. Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 2001. [REVIEW] Hypatia 18 (3):218-221.
  17. Katy Gray Brown (2003). Going Native: Indians in the American Cultural Imagination (Review). Hypatia 18 (3):718-721.
  18. Doug Brugge & Mariam Missaghian (2006). Protecting the Navajo People Through Tribal Regulation of Research. Science and Engineering Ethics 12 (3):491-507.
    This essay explores the process and issues related to community collaborative research that involves Native Americans generally, and specifically examines the Navajo Nation’s efforts to regulate research within its jurisdiction. Researchers need to account for both the experience of Native Americans and their own preconceptions about Native Americans when conducting research about Native Americans. The Navajo Nation institutionalized an approach to protecting members of the nation when it took over Institutional Review Board (IRB) responsibilities from the US Indian Health Service (...)
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  19. E. J. Burrus & J. S. (1963). Alonso de la Veracruz's Defence of the American Indians (1553-54). Heythrop Journal 4 (3):225–253.
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  20. J. Baird Callicott (2000). The Indigenous World or Many Indigenous Worlds? Environmental Ethics 22 (3):291-310.
    Earth’s Insights is about more than indigenous North American environmental attitudes and values. The conclusions of Hester, McPherson, Booth, and Cheney about universal indigenous environmental attitudes and values, although pronounced with papal infallibility, are based on no evidence. The unstated authority of their pronouncements seems to be the indigenous identity of two of the authors. Two other self-identified indigenous authors, V. F. Cordova and Sandy Marie Anglás Grande, argue explicitly that indigenous identity is sufficient authority for declaring what pre-Columbian indigenous (...)
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  21. Jerry Calton, Judith Clair, Larry Lad & Sandra Waddock (2005). Joining the Circle. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society 16:366-367.
    This workshop applied the wisdom circle format, based on the discursive rituals and spiritual practices of Native American tribal councils, to encourage IABSmembers to share personal stories that reveal something of their inner self, as they address the challenges and frustrations of their public lives. By speaking with an “authentic voice” and listening respectfully to others in the circle, a remarkable bond of trust and empathetic understanding emerged in a relatively short period. This innovative learning process encourages both personal reflection (...)
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  22. John L. Childs (1971). Education and the Philosophy of Experimentalism. New York,Arno Press.
    EDUCATION AND THE PHILOSOPHY OF EXPERIMENTALISM CHAPTER I AN INDIGENOUS AMERICAN PHILOSOPHY "Whoever is interested in the future should especially study ...
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  23. Felix S. Cohen (1945). Colonialism: A Realistic Approach. Ethics 55 (3):167-181.
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  24. Michael Cole, John Gay & Joseph Glick (1968). Reversal and Nonreversal Shifts Among Liberian Tribal People. Journal of Experimental Psychology 76 (2p1):323.
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  25. V. F. Cordova (2007). How It Is: The Native American Philosophy of V. F. Cordova. University of Arizona Press.
    Arranges the work of Viola Cordova, presenting her understanding and interpretation of the interactions between people and nature.
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  26. J. Angelo Corlett (2001). Surviving Evil: Jewish, African, and Native Americans. Journal of Social Philosophy 32 (2):207–223.
  27. Norman Dandy (2003). [Book Review] the Native Tourist. [REVIEW] Environmental Values 12 (2):266-267.
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  28. Mark A. Davis (2011). Do Native Birds Care Whether Their Berries Are Native or Exotic? No. BioScience 61 (7):501-502.
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  29. Richard Day (2001). Who is This We That Gives the Gift? Native American Political Theory and the Western Tradition. Critical Horizons 2 (2):173-201.
    The allocation of self-determination rights to minority groups is a highly charged issue around the world, but the difficulties are particularly acute in the case of indigenous peoples within the white settler states. While liberal multiculturalism offers a 'solution' to this 'problem of diversity' through a system of differentiated citizenship rights, this comes only at the expense of excluding dissenting voices from the intercultural dialogue. Through an engagement with the multi-faceted critique of liberal multiculturalism advanced by Native American political theory, (...)
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  30. June E. Downey (1927). Types of Dextrality Among North American Indians. Journal of Experimental Psychology 10 (6):478.
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  31. Phillip H. Duran (2007). On the Cosmic Order of Modern Physics and the Conceptual World of the American Indian. World Futures 63 (1):1 – 27.
    Indigenous peoples have for millennia observed and lived in deference to the same universe as scientists who meticulously record and measure information, but their deep knowledge of the natural world remains unacknowledged by the greater society. This article relates some of that knowledge to physics concepts, particularly relativity and quantum theory, as an initial step toward conveying certain realities of the American Indian world into a Western scientific context such that their meaning is not lost. Modern physics has not only (...)
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  32. Bruce Duthu (2013). Shadow Nations: Tribal Sovereignty and the Limits of Legal Pluralism. Oup Usa.
    In order to counter the steady erosion of tribal powers of self-government, this book argues for redirecting the trajectory of tribal-federal relations to better reflect the formative ethos of legal pluralism that operated in the nation's earliest years.
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  33. Denis Dutton, Tribal Art.
    Tribal art , also termed ethnographic art or, in an expression seldom used today, primitive art , is the art of small-scale nonliterate societies. Some of the traditional artifacts to which the term refers may not be art in any obvious European sense, and many of the cultures where they occur may not strictly-speaking be tribal in social structure. The rubric nevertheless persists because the arts produced by small-scale cultures share significant elements in common. The tribal arts which have gained (...)
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  34. Denis Dutton (1993). Tribal Art and Artifact. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 51 (1):13-21.
    Europeans seeking to understand tribal arts face obvious problems of comprehending the histories, values, and ideas of vastly remote cultures. In this respect the issues faced in understanding tribal art (or folk art, primitive art, traditional art, third or fourth-world art — none of these designations is ideal) are not much different from those encountered in trying to comprehend the distant art of “our own” culture, for instance, the art of medieval Europe. But in the case of tribal or so-called (...)
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  35. Anthony Ellis (2005). Minority Rights and the Preservation of Languages. Philosophy 80 (2):199-217.
    Do minority groups have a right to the preservation of their language? I argue that the rights of groups are always reducible to the rights of individuals. In that case, the question whether minorities have a right to the preservation of their language is a question of whether individuals have a right to it. I argue that, in the only relevant sense of ‘right’, they do not. They may have an interest in the preservation of their language, but, if so, (...)
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  36. Fred G. Evenden (1966). Native Wild Plants of Northeastern United States and Eastern Canada F. H. Montgomery. BioScience 16 (2):127-127.
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  37. Norman G. Finkelstein (1998). Indigenous Rights: Oslo: The Last Stage of Conquest. Radical Philosophy Review 1 (2):133-140.
    The author compares the strategies used in the conquest of the American West, the imperialism of the Third Reich, the creation of Bantustans in South Africa, and cautions against sanguine readings of the Oslo Peace Talks between Israel and Palestine. He concludes that the current agreements are in fact the last stages of Israeli conquest of Palestine.
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  38. Evan Fox-Decent, Fashioning Legal Authority From Power: The Crown-Native Fiduciary Relationship.
    The prevailing view in Canada of the Crown-Native fiduciary relationship is that it arose as a consequence of the Crown taking on the role of intermediary between First Nations and British settlers eager to acquire Aboriginal lands. First Nations are sometimes deemed to have surrendered their sovereignty in exchange for Crown protection. The author suggests that the sovereignty-for-protection argument does not supply a compelling account of how Aboriginal peoples lost their sovereignty to the Crown. Furthermore, Aboriginal treaties compel the courts (...)
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  39. Mark F. N. Franke (2007). Self-Determination Versus the Determination of Self: A Critical Reading of the Colonial Ethics Inherent to the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples. Journal of Global Ethics 3 (3):359 – 379.
    The United Nations' (UN) adoption of a Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples is intended to mark a fundamental ethical turn in the relationships between indigenous peoples and the community of sovereign states. This moment is the result of decades of discussion and negotiation, largely revolving around states' discomfort with notion of indigenous self-determination. Member states of the UN have feared that an ethic of indigenous self-determination would undermine the principles of state sovereignty on which the UN is itself (...)
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  40. Michael Freeman (2002). Past Wrongs and Liberal Justice. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 5 (2):201-220.
    Liberal theories of justice have often been unable to include the recognition of minority rights or of multiculturalism because of their emphasis on individuals. In contrast, recent theories of cultural recognition and minority rights have underestimated the tensions between group and individual rights. It is precisely the incorporation of past wrongs and their impact on present politics that can advance the liberal theory of justice for cultural minorities and their members.
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  41. Romayne Smith Fullerton & Maggie Jones Patterson (2008). 'Killing' the True Story of First Nations: The Ethics of Constructing a Culture Apart. Journal of Mass Media Ethics 23 (3):201 – 218.
    Cases taken from the coverage of Canadian/Ipperwash and American/Makah disputes over tribal land and sea claims point up that subtle but entrenched racist assumptions, conclusions, and myths of native culture persist despite attempts by newsrooms to be more culturally sensitive. Traditional journalism standards of practice and ethical approaches must be expanded to consider more of the subtleties of media's problematic representations of aboriginal peoples—as a culture, a culture apart, and a cultural construct. The ethics of continental philosopher Emmanuel Levinas, the (...)
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  42. Greta Claire Gaard (2001). Tools for a Cross-Cultural Feminist Ethics: Exploring Ethical Contexts and Contents in the Makah Whale Hunt. Hypatia 16 (1):1-26.
    : Antiracist white feminists and ecofeminists have the tools but lack the strategies for responding to issues of social and environmental justice cross-culturally, particularly in matters as complex as the Makah whale hunt. Distinguishing between ethical contexts and contents, I draw on feminist critiques of cultural essentialism, ecofeminist critiques of hunting and food consumption, and socialist feminist analyses of colonialism to develop antiracist feminist and ecofeminist strategies for cross-cultural communication and cross-cultural feminist ethics.
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  43. Margaret P. Gilbert, Collective Remorse.
    This essay explores the nature of an important collective emotion, namely, collective remorse. Three accounts of collective remorse are presented and evaluated. The first involves an aggregate of group members remorseful over acts of their own associated with their group's act; the second an aggregate of persons remorseful over their group's act. The third account posits, in terms that are explained, a joint commitment of a group's members to constitute as far as is possible a single remorseful body. Construed according (...)
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  44. Jerry H. Gill (2002). Native American Worldviews an Introduction. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
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  45. Sam D. Gill (forthcoming). Dictionary of Native American Mythology, Bv Sam D. Gill and Irene F. Sullivan. ABC. Clio.
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  46. Sandy Marie Anglás Grande (1999). Beyond the Ecologically Noble Savage. Environmental Ethics 21 (3):307-320.
    I examine the implications of stereotyping and its intersections with the political realities facing American Indian communities. Specifically, I examine the typification of Indian as ecologically noble savage, as both employed and refuted by environmentalists, through the lenses of cognitive and social psychological perspectives and then bring it within the context of a broader cultural critique. I argue that the noble savage stereotype, often used to promote the environmentalist agenda is nonetheless immersed in the political and ideological parameters of the (...)
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  47. Michael K. Green (1993). Images of Native Americans in Advertising: Some Moral Issues. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 12 (4):323 - 330.
    Images of Native Americans and of aspects of Native American culture are common in advertisements in the United States. Three such images can be distinguished — the Noble Savage, the Civilizable Savage and the Bloodthirsty Savage images. The aim of this paper is to argue that the use of such images is not morally acceptable because these images depend upon an underlying conception of Native Americans that denies that they are human beings. By so doing, it also denies to them (...)
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  48. Alicia Hall (2002). What the Navajo Culture Teaches About Informed Consent. HEC Forum 14 (3):241-246.
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  49. Ronnie Hawkins (2001). Cultural Whaling, Commodification, and Culture Change. Environmental Ethics 23 (3):287-306.
    Whaling is back on the international stage as pro-whaling interests push to reopen commercial whaling by overturning the moratorium imposed in 1986. Proponents of ending the ban are using two strategies: (1) appealing to public sentiment that supports indigenous subsistence whaling by attempting to cloak commercial whaling in the same guise and (2) maintaining that reopening commercial whaling is the “scientific” option. I reject both ploys, and instead shift the focus for global debate to scrutinizing the industrial economic model that (...)
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  50. Joseph Heath (1998). Culture: Choice or Circumstance? Constellations 5 (2):183-200.
    In this paper, I would like to discuss two recent attempts to incorporate groupdifferentiated rights and entitlements into a broadly liberal conception of distributive justice. The first is John Roemer’s “pragmatic theory of responsibility,” and the second is Will Kymlicka’s defense of minority rights in “multinational” states.1 Both arguments try to show that egalitarianism, far from requiring a “color-blind” system of institutions and laws that is insensitive to ethnic, linguistic or subcultural differences, may in fact mandate special types of rights, (...)
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