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  1. H. G. Callaway (2006). Emerson on Creativity in Thought and Action. In , R.W. Emerson, The Conduct of Life: A Philosophical Reading.
    The opening essay of Emerson’s 1860 book, The Conduct of Life, posed, in that fateful year of threatening Civil War and disunion, the philosophical problem of human freedom and fate. The essay “Fate” is followed in the present book by a series of essays on related themes, including: “Power,” “Wealth,” “Culture,” “Worship,” “Beauty” and “Illusions.” The central question of the volume is, “How shall I live?” Appreciating both our freedom and its limits, we understand the vitality of power to acquire (...)
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  2. H. G. Callaway (ed.) (2006). R.W. Emerson, The Conduct of Life: A Philosophical Reading. University Press of America.
    My new edition of Emerson's Conduct, modernizes the prose spelling, annotates the text and adds a short chronology, a bibliography foused on Emerson's sources, a new Introduction, and a comprehensive index. Available in HB and PB.
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  3. Anthony Celano (2013). The Foundation of Moral Reasoning: The Development of the Doctrine of Universal Moral Principles in the Works of Thomas Aquinas and His Predecessors. Diametros 38:1-61.
    This article considers the development of the idea of universal moral principles in the work of Thomas Aquinas and his predecessors in the thirteenth century. Like other medieval authors who sought to place the principles of moral practice on a foundation more secure than on the choices of the good person, as described by Aristotle, Thomas chooses to introduce a measure of ethical certitude through the concept of the innate habit of synderesis. This idea, introduced by Jerome in his commentary (...)
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  4. T. Chappell & David S. Oderberg (eds.) (2004). Natural Law.
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  5. Ea Goerner (1990). Goerner on Thomistic Natural Law-Reply. Political Theory 18 (4):650-655.
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  6. B. Goss & R. Vitz (forthcoming). Natural Law Among Moral Strangers. Christian Bioethics.
    Our goal in this paper is two-fold. First, we aim to clarify two ways in which contemporary Christian bioethicists have erred, on Engelhardt’s account, in their attempts to do bioethics within a distinctively non- Christian idiom, namely, either (1) by rejecting a principal metaethical thesis or (2) by misrepresenting a principal moral-epistemological thesis of natural-law ethics, properly construed. Second, we intend to show not only that Engelhardt can and should endorse the Christian bioethicists’ use of non-Christian moral idioms in the (...)
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  7. John Haldane (2011). Adam Smith, Theology, and Natural Law Ethics. In Paul Oslington (ed.), Adam Smith as Theologian. Routledge.
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  8. Stephen Hall (2011). Custom, Enactment and Legal Order: A Natural Law Account. Journal of Catholic Social Thought 8 (1):127-162.
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  9. Christopher Kaczor (2001). Moral Absolutism and Ectopic Pregnancy. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 26 (1):61 – 74.
    If one accepts a version of absolutism that excludes the intentional killing of any innocent human person from conception to natural death, ectopic pregnancy poses vexing difficulties. Given that the embryonic life almost certainly will die anyway, how can one retain ones moral principle and yet adequately respond to a situation that gravely threatens the life of the mother and her future fertility? The four options of treatment most often discussed in the literature are non-intervention, salpingectomy (removal of tube with (...)
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  10. John Keown (2002). Euthanasia, Ethics, and Public Policy: An Argument Against Legalisation. Cambridge University Press.
    Whether the law should permit voluntary euthanasia or physician-assisted suicide is one of the most vital questions facing all modern societies. Internationally, the main obstacle to legalisation has proved to be the objection that, even if they were morally acceptable in certain 'hard cases', voluntary euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide could not be effectively controlled; society would slide down a 'slippery slope' to the killing of patients who did not make a free and informed request, or for whom palliative care would (...)
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  11. Anthony J. Lisska (2013). Human Rights Theory Rooted in the Writings of Thomas Aquinas. Diametros 38:133-151.
    This essay is an analysis of the theory of human rights based on the writings of Thomas Aquinas, with special reference to the Summa Theologiae. The difference between a jus naturale found in Aquinas and the theory of human rights developed by the sixteenth century scholastic philosophers is articulated. The distinction between objective natural rights—“what is right”—and subjective natural rights—“a right”—is discussed noting that Aquinas held the former position and that later scholastic philosophers beginning with the Salamanca School of the (...)
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  12. Matthew B. O'Brien (2013). Elizabeth Anscombe and the New Natural Lawyers on Intentional Action. National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly (1):47-56.
  13. Matthew B. O'Brien (2012). The Second-Person Perspective in Aquinas's Ethics: Virtues and Gifts. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews.
  14. Michaael Pakaluk (2013). Some Observations on Natural Law. Diametros 38:152-174.
    The paper offers some observations with a view to correcting ostensible misunderstandings of the so-called New Natural Law (“NNL”) theory, concluding that the NNL theory is unworkable and unsustainable, even on its own terms. It is argued that the NNL theory is based on fundamental misunderstandings of the nature of necessity in Aquinas; the nature of propositions which are “known in themselves” (per se nota); and the nature of fundamental practical reasoning. It is argued that, where the NNL theory differs (...)
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  15. Craig Paterson (2010). Review of Assisted Suicide and Euthanasia: A Natural Law Ethics Approach. [REVIEW] Ethics and Medicine 26 (1):23-4.
    As medical technology advances and severely injured or ill people can be kept alive and functioning long beyond what was previously medically possible, the debate surrounding the ethics of end-of-life care and quality-of-life issues has grown more urgent. In this lucid and vigorous book, Craig Paterson discusses assisted suicide and euthanasia from a fully fledged but non-dogmatic secular natural law perspective. He rehabilitates and revitalises the natural law approach to moral reasoning by developing a pluralistic account of just why we (...)
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  16. Susanna Maria Taraschi (2010). Paterson, Craig: Assisted Suicide and Euthanasia: A Natural Law Ethics Approach. [REVIEW] Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 31 (3):245-247.
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  17. Peter Tumulty (1981). Aristotle, Feminism and Natural Law Theory. New Scholasticism 55 (4):450-464.
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