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  1. added 2015-05-27
    Carrie Giunta, Blood Coltan: Remote-Controlled Warfare and the Demand for Strategic Minerals. Pambazuka.
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  2. added 2015-05-04
    David L. Akey, W. Clay Brown, Joyce Jose, Richard J. Kuhn & Janet L. Smith (forthcoming). Structure-Guided Insights on the Role of NS1 in Flavivirus Infection. Bioessays:n/a-n/a.
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  3. added 2015-04-27
    Khaled Moustafa (2014). MAPK Cascades and Major Abiotic Stresses. Plant Cell Reports 33.
    Plants have evolved with complex signaling circuits that operate under multiple conditions and govern numerous cellular functions. Stress signaling in plant cells is a sophisticated network composed of interacting proteins organized into tiered cascades where the function of a molecule is dependent on the interaction and the activation of another. In a linear scheme, the receptors of cell surface sense the stimuli and convey stress signals through specific pathways and downstream phosphorylation events controlled by mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinases and second (...)
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  4. added 2015-04-18
    Terrance Quinn (2014). Generalized Empirical Method in the Biological Sciences. Dialogues in Philosophy, Mental and Neuro Sciences 7 (1):31.
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  5. added 2015-04-12
    Marco Solinas (2015). From Aristotle’s Teleology to Darwin’s Genealogy: The Stamp of Inutility, Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2015. Palgrave Macmillan.
    Starting with Aristotle and moving on to Darwin, Marco Solinas outlines the basic steps from the birth, establishment and later rebirth of the traditional view of living beings, and its overturning by evolutionary revolution. The classic framework devised by Aristotle was still dominant in the 17th Century world of Galileo, Harvey and Ray, and remained hegemonic until the time of Lamarck and Cuvier in the 19th Century. Darwin's breakthrough thus takes on the dimensions of an abandonment of the traditional finalistic (...)
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  6. added 2015-03-31
    Craig Nevin (1995). The Design and Cadaveric Assessment of a New Artificial First Metatarsophalangeal Joint Replacement for the Great Toe. Dissertation, University of Cape Town
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  7. added 2015-03-27
    Dominique Raynaud (2013). Optics and Perspective Prior to Alberti. In B. Paolozzi Strozzi & M. Bormand (eds.), The Springtime of the Renaissance. Mandragora. 165-171.
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  8. added 2015-03-27
    Dominique Raynaud (2009). Why Did Geometrical Optics Not Lead to Perspective in Medieval Islam? In M. Cherkaoui & P. Hamilton (eds.), Raymond Boudon: A Life in Sociology. Bardwell Press. 243-266.
    The idea that linear perspective arose only in the West due to the strength of an unusual process of rationalization is denied by the fact that IXth century Islamic scholars had yet a thorough knowledge of the optical and geometrical materials required in perspective. In addition, the process of rationalization was rarely so intense as in that time, because truth uniqueness and scientific communalism were core values of Medieval Islam. The puzzle is not a matter of less or more rationality, (...)
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  9. added 2015-03-27
    Dominique Raynaud (2001). Effets de Réseau Dans la Science Pré-Institutionnelle: Le Cas de l'Optique Médiévale. European Journal of Sociology 42:483-505.
    This paper wonders why the Franciscan order took part in the diffusion of optics more than other medieval organisation, both religious and secular. First, clues of this social asymmetry are given. Then, an explanation is put forward: 1. An initial asymmetry existed, by the fact that Grosseteste’s optics was known in the Franciscan studium of Oxford; 2. Since that date, optics spread among the order by a network effect; 3. The rivaltry between the mendicant orders and the homophilia that presided (...)
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  10. added 2015-03-27
    Dominique Raynaud (2001). La Faveur de l'Optique À Oxford. Discussion de Trois Thèses de Sociologie de la Connaissance Sur l'Explication de l'Intérêt Scientifique. Llull 24:727-754.
    The Mertonian sociology of knowledge admited that XVIIth century Puritan ethos favoured the use of experimental method. Recent works of sociology of scientific knowledge postulate either the continuity between scientific knowledge and social beliefs or the causal determination of the first ones by the second. This paper analyses the reasons of XIIIth century flight of optics in the studium of Oxford. Focusing on the continuity between optics and metaphysics of light unfolded in Oxford, it goes away from both of those (...)
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  11. added 2015-03-26
    Dominique Raynaud (forthcoming). Un Fragment du De Speculis Comburentibus de Regiomontanus Copié Par Toscanelli Et Inséré Dans les Carnets de Leonardo. Annals of Science.
    This article studies a fragment on the conic sections that appear in the Codex Atlanticus, fols. 611rb/915ra. Arguments are put forward to assemble these two folios. Their comparison with the Latin texts available before 1500 shows that they derive from the De speculis comburentibus of Alhacen and the De speculis comburentibus of Regiomontanus, joined together in his autograph manuscript (Vienna, Öster. Nationalbibliothek, Cod. 5258). Having identified the sources, and discussed their mathematics, the issue of their transmission is targeted. It is (...)
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  12. added 2015-03-26
    Dominique Raynaud (2013). Determining the Speed of Light (1676-1983): An Internalist Study in the Sociology of Science. Cairn International / Année Sociologique 63 (2):359-398.
    This article aims at contributing to the methods of the sociology of science, from an empirical study of the determinations of the velocity of light between 1676 and 1983. Far from being constructed and deconstructed at pleasure, the values of c have undergone a tendentially unidirectional and irreversible process of revision. The competing methods remained in the running as long as they produced an uncertainty less than, or equal to, the best known value. The analysis of “entrances” and “exits” of (...)
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  13. added 2015-03-16
    Nahum Kipnis, History of Science Enters Through the Back Door.
    The author argues for a greater involvement of professional historians of science into teaching science to improve the historical component of science. Yet, however much some teachers like history they find no room in the curriculum for a history of science course. The solution is in make the history of science a useful tool for teaching physics. The author shares his experience of using historical experiments carried out by students in a lab setting. Playing scientists not only improved understanding of (...)
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  14. added 2015-03-16
    Nahum Kipnis (2011). Errors in Science and Their Treatment in Teaching Science. Science & Education 20:655-685.
    This paper analyses the real origin and nature of scientific errors against claims of science critics, by examining a number of examples from the history of electricity and optics. This analysis leads to a conclusion that errors are a natural and unavoidable part of scientific process. If made available to students, through their science teachers, such a knowledge, would give students a deeper insight into the scientific process and remove their fear of making errors in their own laboratory work.
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  15. added 2015-03-16
    Nahum Kipnis (2005). Scientific Analogies and Their Use in Teaching Science. Science & Education 14:199-233.
    Analogy in science knew its successes and failures, as illustrated by examples from the eighteenth-century physics. At times, some scientists abstained from using a certain analogy on the ground that it had not yet been demonstrated. Several false discoveries in the 18th and early 19th centuries appeared to support their caution. It is now clear that such a position reflected a methodological confusion that resulted from a failure to distinguish between particular and general analogies. Considering analogy as a hierarchical structure (...)
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  16. added 2015-03-16
    Nahum Kipnis (2001). Scientific Controversies in Teaching Science: The Case of Volta. Science & Education 10:33-49.
    This paper discusses a way of introducing a scientific controversy, which emphasizes objective aspects of such issues as multiple theoretical interpretation of phenomena, choosing a theory, insistence on the chosen theory, and others. The goal is to give students a better insight into the workings of science and provide guidelines for building theories in their own research.
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  17. added 2015-03-16
    Nahum Kipnis (2000). A History of Science Approach to the Nature of Science. In W. McComas (ed.), The Nature of Science in Science Education: Rationales and Strategies. 177-196.
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  18. added 2015-03-16
    Nahum Kipnis (1992). Book Reviews - ISIS: History of the Principle of Interference of Light. Isis 83 (4):671-72.
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  19. added 2015-03-11
    Stephan Hartmann, Larry Wilets & Ping Tang (1997). The Chromodielectric Soliton Model: Quark Self-Energy and Hadron Bags. Physical Review C 55:2067-2077.
    The chromodielectric soliton model is Lorentz and chirally invariant. It has been demonstrated to exhibit dynamical chiral symmetry breaking and spatial confinement in the locally uniform approximation. We here study the full nonlocal quark self-energy in a color-dielectric medium modeled by a two-parameter Fermi function. Here color confinement is manifest. The self-energy thus obtained is used to calculate quark wave functions in the medium which, in turn, are used to calculate the nucleon and pion masses in the one-gluon-exchange approximation. The (...)
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  20. added 2015-03-08
    Elio Conte (2015). Additional Comments Added to Our Recent Answer to G. Ghirardi. Journal of Modern Physics 6 (1).
    Recently we published on International Journal of Theoretical Physics an answer to G. Ghirardi relating a paper published by this author in 1999. Since the argument is so complex and articulated, in the present paper we add further comments relating in particular the matter of the quantum collapse as we have elaborated it in our previous work using only Clifford algebra and thus reaching the basic result that it is a mechanism involving only information with a cybernetic collapse and retrocollapse (...)
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  21. added 2015-02-28
    A. Danchin (ed.) (1987). Order and Necessity. Elsevier Sciences Publishers.
    Because this lecture was a tribute to the contribution of Monod to science it focused on his views, without discussing the work of others who contributed to his achievements. In particular, because Monod was implicitly a platonician/pythagorean (with his emphasis on the importance of beauty in things), he thought that symmetry had to be introduced in the concept of allostery. In fact this was an extra feature that was absent from the original work of Jean-Pierre Changeux on the enzyme threonine (...)
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