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  1. Sylvia Abonyi (1996). ABO Blood Groups and Cholera: An Investigation of an Infectious Disease as an Agent of Natural Selection. Nexus 12 (1):1.
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  2. A. C. Allison (1969). Natural Selection and Population Diversity. Journal of Biosocial Science 1 (S1):15-30.
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  3. Eugenio Andrade (2011). How Deep is the Conflict Between Self-Organization and Natural Selection? Ludus Vitalis 19 (35):289-311.
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  4. André Ariew (2003). Ernst Mayr's 'Ultimate/Proximate' Distinction Reconsidered and Reconstructed. Biology and Philosophy 18 (4):553-565.
    It's been 41 years since the publication of Ernst Mayr's Cause and Effect in Biology wherein Mayr most clearly develops his version of the influential distinction between ultimate and proximate causes in biology. In critically assessing Mayr's essay I uncover false statements and red-herrings about biological explanation. Nevertheless, I argue to uphold an analogue of the ultimate/proximate distinction as it refers to two different kinds of explanations, one dynamical the other statistical.
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  5. Aristotle (2004). Selection From Categories. In Tim Crane & Katalin Farkas (eds.), Metaphysics: A Guide and Anthology. Oup Oxford.
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  6. D. M. Armstrong (2004). Selection From A Combinational Theory of Possibility. In Tim Crane & Katalin Farkas (eds.), Metaphysics: A Guide and Anthology. Oup Oxford.
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  7. William R. Atchley, J. J. Rutledge & David E. Cowley (1982). Direct and Correlated Response to Selection in Osteometric Traits in the Rat. BioScience 32 (8):684-684.
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  8. Gillian Barker & John Odling-Smee (2013). Integrating Ecology and Evolution: Niche Construction and Ecological Engineering. In Gillian Barker, Eric Desjardins & Trevor Pearce (eds.), Entangled Life: Organism and Environment in the Biological and Social Sciences. Springer. 187-211.
  9. Charles A. Berger (1932). The Genetical Theory of Natural Selection. Thought 7 (1):167-171.
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  10. Carl T. Bergstrom & Peter Godfrey-Smith (1998). On the Evolution of Behavioral Complexity in Individuals and Populations. Biology and Philosophy 13 (2):205-31.
    A wide range of ecological and evolutionary models predict variety in phenotype or behavior when a population is at equilibrium. This heterogeneity can be realized in different ways. For example, it can be realized through a complex population of individuals exhibiting different simple behaviors, or through a simple population of individuals exhibiting complex, varying behaviors. In some theoretical frameworks these different realizations are treated as equivalent, but natural selection distinguishes between these two alternatives in subtle ways. By investigating an increasingly (...)
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  11. R. J. Berry (forthcoming). Natural Selection Could Not Have Done It All. Human Nature.
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  12. Michael Bertrand (2013). Proper Environment and the SEP Account of Biological Function. Synthese 190 (9):1503-1517.
    The survival enhancing propensity (SEP) account has a crucial role to play in the analysis of proper function. However, a central feature of the account, its specification of the proper environment to which functions are relativized, is seriously underdeveloped. In this paper, I argue that existent accounts of proper environment fail because they either allow too many or too few characters to count as proper functions. While SEP accounts retain their promise, they are unworkable because of their inability to specify (...)
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  13. Jonathan Birch (2014). Has Grafen Formalized Darwin? Biology and Philosophy 29 (2):175-180.
    One key aim of Grafen’s Formal Darwinism project is to formalize ‘modern biology’s understanding and updating of Darwin’s central argument’. In this commentary, I consider whether Grafen has succeeded in this aim.
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  14. Jonathan Birch (2012). The Negative View of Natural Selection. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 43 (2):569-573.
    An influential argument due to Elliott Sober, subsequently strengthened by Denis Walsh and Joel Pust, moves from plausible premises to the bold conclusion that natural selection cannot explain the traits of individual organisms. If the argument were sound, the explanatory scope of selection would depend, surprisingly, on metaphysical considerations concerning origin essentialism. I show that the Sober-Walsh-Pust argument rests on a flawed counterfactual criterion for explanatory relevance. I further show that a more defensible criterion for explanatory relevance recently proposed by (...)
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  15. Jonathan Birch & James A. R. Marshall (2014). Queller's Separation Condition Explained and Defended. American Naturalist 184 (4):531-540.
    The theories of inclusive fitness and multilevel selection provide alternative perspectives on social evolution. The question of whether these perspectives are of equal generality remains a divisive issue. In an analysis based on the Price equation, Queller argued (by means of a principle he called the separation condition) that the two approaches are subject to the same limitations, arising from their fundamentally quantitative-genetical character. Recently, van Veelen et al. have challenged Queller’s results, using this as the basis for a broader (...)
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  16. Alexander Bird (2006). Selection and Explanation. In , Rethinking Explanation. Springer. 131--136.
    Selection explanations explain some non-accidental generalizations in virtue of a selection process. Such explanations are not particulaizable - they do not transfer as explanations of the instances of such generalizations. This is unlike many explanations in the physical sciences, where the explanation of the general fact also provides an explanation of its instances (i.e. standard D-N explanations). Are selection explanations (e.g. in biology) therefore a different kind of explanation? I argue that to understand this issue, we need to see that (...)
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  17. Jesper L. Boldsen (1992). Geographical Distribution of Some Danish Surnames: Reflections of Social and Natural Selection. Journal of Biosocial Science 24 (4):505-513.
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  18. Jean-Sébastien Bolduc & Frank Cézilly (2012). Optimality Modelling in the Real World. Biology and Philosophy 27 (6):851-869.
    In a recent paper, Potochnik (Biol Philos 24(2):183–197, 2009) analyses some uses of optimality modelling in light of the anti-adaptationism criticism. She distinguishes two broad classes of such uses (weak and strong) on the basis of assumptions held by biologists about the role and the importance of natural selection. This is an interesting proposal that could help in the epistemological characterisation of some biological practices. However, Potochnik’s distinction also rests on the assumption that all optimality modelling represent the selection dynamic (...)
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  19. Frédéric Bouchard (2009). Understanding Colonial Traits Using Symbiosis Research and Ecosystem Ecology. Biological Theory 4 (3):240-246.
    E. O. Wilson (1974: 54) describes the problem that social organisms pose: “On what bases do we distinguish the extremely modified members of an invertebrate colony from the organs of a metazoan animal?” This framing of the issue has inspired many to look more closely at how groups of organisms form and behave as emergent individuals. The possible existence of “superorganisms” test our best intuitions about what can count and act as genuine biological individuals and how we should study them. (...)
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  20. Maarten Boudry & Michael Vlerick (2014). Natural Selection Does Care About Truth. International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 28 (1):65-77.
    (2014). Natural Selection Does Care about Truth. International Studies in the Philosophy of Science: Vol. 28, No. 1, pp. 65-77. doi: 10.1080/02698595.2014.915651.
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  21. Pierrick Bourrat (2014). From Survivors to Replicators: Evolution by Natural Selection Revisited. Biology and Philosophy 29 (4):517-538.
    For evolution by natural selection to occur it is classically admitted that the three ingredients of variation, difference in fitness and heredity are necessary and sufficient. In this paper, I show using simple individual-based models, that evolution by natural selection can occur in populations of entities in which neither heredity nor reproduction are present. Furthermore, I demonstrate by complexifying these models that both reproduction and heredity are predictable Darwinian products (i.e. complex adaptations) of populations initially lacking these two properties but (...)
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  22. Robert Brandon & Leonore Fleming (2014). Drift Sometimes Dominates Selection, and Vice Versa: A Reply to Clatterbuck, Sober and Lewontin. Biology and Philosophy 29 (4):577-585.
    Clatterbuck et al. (Biol Philos 28: 577–592, 2013) argue that there is no fact of the matter whether selection dominates drift or vice versa in any particular case of evolution. Their reasons are not empirically based; rather, they are purely conceptual. We show that their conceptual presuppositions are unmotivated, unnecessary and overly complex. We also show that their conclusion runs contrary to current biological practice. The solution is to recognize that evolution involves a probabilistic sampling process, and that drift is (...)
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  23. Björn Brunnander (2013). Natural Selection and Multiple Realisation: A Closer Look. International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 27 (1):73 - 83.
    The target of this article is the claim that natural selection accounts for the multiple realisation of biological and psychological kinds. I argue that the explanation actually offered does not provide any insight about the phenomenon since it presupposes multiple realisation as an unexplained premise, and this is what does all the work. The purported explanation mistakenly invokes the ?indifference? of selection to structure as an additional explanatorily relevant factor. While such indifference can be explanatory in intentional contexts, it is (...)
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  24. Eugenio Bulygin & Nora Stigol (2007). En Memoria de Eduardo A. Rabossi. Análisis Filosófico 27 (1):91-94.
    En uno de los ataques más reiterados a Darwin, que todavía subsiste en la literatura actual, se señala que la teoría de la selección natural es tautológica, analítica o, al menos, irrefutable. En docenas de artículos, diversos autores han señalado las condiciones en que la selección natural quedaría refutada, intentando mostrar que no carece de contenido empírico. La estrategia seguida en este trabajo será otra. Teniendo en cuenta que la crítica de tautologicidad o irrefutabilidad ha sido esgrimida contra leyes fundamentales (...)
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  25. Henry C. Byerly & Richard E. Michod (1991). Fitness and Evolutionary Explanation. [REVIEW] Biology and Philosophy 6 (1):45-53.
    Recent philosophical discussions have failed to clarify the roles of the concept fitness in evolutionary theory. Neither the propensity interpretation of fitness nor the construal of fitness as a primitive theoretical term succeed in explicating the empirical content and explanatory power of the theory of natural selection. By appealing to the structure of simple mathematical models of natural selection, we separate out different contrasts which have tended to confuse discussions of fitness: the distinction between what fitness is defined as versus (...)
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  26. Piotr Cal & Michał Woźniak (2012). Drift Detection and Model Selection Algorithms: Concept and Experimental Evaluation. In Emilio Corchado, Vaclav Snasel, Ajith Abraham, Michał Woźniak, Manuel Grana & Sung-Bae Cho (eds.), Hybrid Artificial Intelligent Systems. Springer. 558--568.
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  27. Gustavo Caponi, Claude Bernard, Charles Darwin y los dos modos fundamentales de interrogar lo viviente. Principia.
    Research in modern biology has largely been developed according to two main ways of inquiry, as they were outlined by Charles Darwin and Claude Bernard. Each stands for a specific approach to the living corresponding to two different methodological rules: the principle of natural selection and the principle of causation.
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  28. Gustavo Caponi (2010). Función, adaptación Y diseño en biología. Signos Filosóficos 12 (24):71-101.
    El gran malentendido que está por detrás de la concepción etiológicadel concepto de función es haber confundido este último con el concepto de adaptación. Las explicaciones por selección natural no justifican imputaciones funcionales: ellas explican la configuración de determinada estructura orgánic..
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  29. Gustavo Caponi (2010). La regla de Darwin. Principia 4 (1):27-78.
    Taking as a starting point Brandon's account of the principle of natural selection, we argue that it is possible to consider such a principle as bearing the same status of the principle of causation, to wit, that of a methodological rule whose function would be to introduce a "teleological mode of inquiring the living". This way of understanding the principle of natural selection will drive us into an interpretation of Darwinism that is close to that one argued for by Daniel (...)
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  30. Camilo José Cela Conde (1984). Selección Natural y Emergencia de la Ética. Teorema 14 (1-2):177-184.
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  31. Douglas C. Chatfield & Erwin J. Janek (1972). Attribute Selection in Concept Identification. Journal of Experimental Psychology 95 (1):97.
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  32. Karla Chediak (2005). The Problem of Individuation in Biology in the Light of Determination of the Unit of Natural Selection. Scientiae Studia 3 (1):65-78.
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  33. Hayley Clatterbuck, Elliott Sober & Richard Lewontin (2013). Selection Never Dominates Drift (nor Vice Versa). Biology and Philosophy 28 (4):577-592.
    The probability that the fitter of two alleles will increase in frequency in a population goes up as the product of N (the effective population size) and s (the selection coefficient) increases. Discovering the distribution of values for this product across different alleles in different populations is a very important biological task. However, biologists often use the product Ns to define a different concept; they say that drift “dominates” selection or that drift is “stronger than” selection when Ns is much (...)
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  34. C. Coe (1896). Nature Versus Natural Selection. Philosophical Review 5:437.
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  35. John Collier (1996). Looking Beyond the Veil of Natural Selection. Biology and Philosophy 12 (1):89-99.
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  36. Josep Corcó (2001). La Selección Natural En Popper y Peirce. Anuario Filosófico 34 (69):139-156.
    Both Peirce and Popper thought about the darwinian theory of evolution. From different perspectives they coincided in stating that natural selection is a non productive factor of biological evolution. Each of them put forward an active agent other than natural selection in the evolutionary process.
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  37. John F. Cornell (1987). God's Magnificent Law: The Bad Influence of Theistic Metaphysics on Darwin's Estimation of Natural Selection. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Biology 20 (3):381 - 412.
    It is natural for us — living after the Darwinian Revolution and the neo-Darwinian synthesis — to consider the adoption of evolution by natural selection as unconditionally rational, because it now seems the best theory or explanation of many phenomena. Nonetheless, if we take historical inquiry seriously, as allowing us to probe into the ground of our knowledge, the roots of even this “rational” Darwinism might be unearthed. Darwinian doctrine betrays a deceptive desire for unity and simplicity of principle, and (...)
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  38. Jocelyne Couture (2008). Sélection Rationnelle. Philosophiques 35 (2):547-560.
    J’arguerai ici que tout en repoussant d’une main une conception du changement social basé sur la sélection naturelle des pratiques sociales et des individus qui y participent, les théories normatives qui font appel à des modélisations des choix sociaux, qu’ils soient de nature économique, politique ou morale, en entretiennent potentiellement les conséquences. Plus précisément, j’arguerai que les modèles que l’on utilise encore le plus volontiers dans les sciences sociales, c’est-à-dire ceux de la théorie des jeux, de la théorie de la (...)
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  39. Joel Cracraft (1993). Domains of Selection Natural Selection: Domains, Levels, and Challenges George C. Williams. BioScience 43 (9):641-642.
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  40. Lindley Darden & Joseph A. Cain (1989). Selection Type Theories. Philosophy of Science 56 (1):106-129.
    Selection type theories solve adaptation problems. Natural selection, clonal selection for antibody production, and selective theories of higher brain function are examples. An abstract characterization of typical selection processes is generated by analyzing and extending previous work on the nature of natural selection. Once constructed, this abstraction provides a useful tool for analyzing the nature of other selection theories and may be of use in new instances of theory construction. This suggests the potential fruitfulness of research to find other theory (...)
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  41. C. G. Darwin (1930). The Genetical Theory of Natural Selection. The Eugenics Review 22 (2):127.
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  42. Charles Darwin (2010). The Descent of Man and Selection in Relation to Sex: Documento. Revista de Filosofia 42 (128):13-34.
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  43. Charles Darwin (2009). Sobre a origem das espécies por meio de selecção natural. Critica.
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  44. L. Darwin (1917). A Criticism of Natural Selection. Mimicry in Butterflies. The Eugenics Review 9 (1):62.
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  45. Leonard Darwin (1928). Natural Selection—a Correction. The Eugenics Review 20 (2):142.
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  46. Leonard Darwin (1927). Natural Selection. The Eugenics Review 18 (4):285.
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  47. Benoit Desjardins (1999). Model Selection for Causal Theories. In Maria Luisa Dalla Chiara (ed.), Language, Quantum, Music. 49--59.
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  48. Michael R. Dietrich & Roberta L. Millstein (2008). The Role of Causal Processes in the Neutral and Nearly Neutral Theories. Philosophy of Science 75 (5):548-559.
    The neutral and nearly neutral theories of molecular evolution are sometimes characterized as theories about drift alone, where drift is described solely as an outcome, rather than a process. We argue, however, that both selection and drift, as causal processes, are integral parts of both theories. However, the nearly neutral theory explicitly recognizes alleles and/or molecular substitutions that, while engaging in weakly selected causal processes, exhibit outcomes thought to be characteristic of random drift. A narrow focus on outcomes obscures the (...)
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  49. José Díez & Pablo Lorenzano (2013). Who Got What Wrong? Fodor and Piattelli on Darwin: Guiding Principles and Explanatory Models in Natural Selection. [REVIEW] Erkenntnis 78 (5):1143-1175.
    The purpose of this paper is to defend, contra Fodor and Piattelli-Palmarini (F&PP), that the theory of natural selection (NS) is a perfectly bona fide empirical unified explanatory theory. F&PP claim there is nothing non-truistic, counterfactual-supporting, of an “adaptive” character and common to different explanations of trait evolution. In his debate with Fodor, and in other works, Sober defends NS but claims that, compared with classical mechanics (CM) and other standard theories, NS is peculiar in that its explanatory models are (...)
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  50. João Dinis de Sousa (2006). Book Review: A Reason for Everything: Natural Selection and the English Imagination. [REVIEW] Bioessays 28 (6):679-680.
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