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  1. Mirko Aćimović (2009). Ontologija Prirode. Akademska Knjiga.
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  2. Ch D. Agaev (2005). Mirovozzrenie Ili Nei͡avnye Zakony Prirody. I͡urd.
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  3. Nicholas Agar (2001). Life's Intrinsic Value: Science, Ethics, and Nature. Columbia University Press.
    Are bacteriophage T4 and the long-nosed elephant fish valuable in their own right? Nicholas Agar defends an affirmative answer to this question by arguing that anything living is intrinsically valuable. This claim challenges received ethical wisdom according to which only human beings are valuable in themselves. The resulting biocentric or life-centered morality forms the platform for an ethic of the environment. -/- Agar builds a bridge between the biological sciences and what he calls "folk" morality to arrive at a workable (...)
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  4. Vlad Alexandrescu & Robert Theis (eds.) (2010). Nature et Surnaturel: Philosophies de la Nature et Métaphysique aux XVIe-XVIIIe siècles. Georg Olms Verlag.
    Depuis Kant, les philosophes ont appris à parler, avec prudence, du surnaturel et de sa relation avec la nature. En général le surnaturel n’est même pas reconnu comme faisant partie de la philosophie. La situation n’aurait pu être plus différente aux XVIIe-XVIIIe siècles, lorsque les philosophes comprenaient la relation entre Dieu et le monde comme l’un des problèmes les plus importants que la philosophie fût censé résoudre. Les solutions étaient bien sûr extrêmement diverses : Spinoza niera même que l’on puisse (...)
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  5. Carlos Alonso Bedate & Javier Bustamante Donas (eds.) (2011). Lo Natural, Lo Artificial y la Cultura. Universidad Pontificia Comillas.
    Este nuevo volumen de "Estudios Interdisciplinares" reúne diversas reflexiones que abordan el problema de lo natural y de lo artificial en el marco de la cultura humana. Lo natural y lo artificial son siempre parte de la naturaleza real. Pero la acción humana debe ser creadora de cultura y, por ello, tanto su vinculación a la naturaleza como su acción creadora de un mundo de artefactos posibles deben estar siempre al servicio de la especie humana, es decir, al servicio de (...)
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  6. Sergeĭ Shalvovich Avaliani (2004). Xx Saukunis Naturpʻilosopʻia. Sakʻartʻvelos Pʻilosopʻiur Mecʻnierebatʻa Akademia.
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  7. Patrik Baard (2016). Cautiously Utopian Goals : Philosophical Analyses of Climate Change Objectives and Sustainability Targets. Dissertation, KTH Royal Institute of Technology
    In this thesis, the framework within which long-term goals are set and subsequently achieved or approached is analyzed. Sustainable development and climate change are areas in which goals have tobe set despite uncertainties. The analysis is divided into the normative motivations for setting such goals, what forms of goals could be set given the empirical and normative uncertainties, and how tomanage doubts regarding achievability or values after a goal has been set. Paper I discusses a set of questions that moral (...)
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  8. Meera Baindur (2009). Nature as Non-Terrestrial. Environmental Philosophy 6 (2):43-58.
    A complex process of place-making by Vedic and Purāṇic primary narratives and localized oral secondary narratives shows how nature in India is perceived from a deeply humanized worldview. Some form of cosmic descent from other place-worlds or lokas are used to account for the sacredness of a landscape in the primary narrative called stala purāṇa, while secondary narratives, called stala māhāṭmya, recount the human experience of the sacred. I suggest that sacred geography is not geography of “terrestrial” but of implaced (...)
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  9. Robert E. Bass (1991). Some Features of Organization in Nature: A Contribution to Unified Science. Adamson Print. Co..
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  10. Michelle Bastian (2012). Fatally Confused: Telling the Time in the Midst of Ecological Crises. Journal of Environmental Philosophy 9 (1):23-48.
    Focusing particularly on the role of the clock in social life, this article explores the conventions we use to “tell the time.” I argue that although clock time generally appears to be an all-encompassing tool for social coordination, it is actually failing to coordinate us with some of the most pressing ecological changes currently taking place. Utilizing philosophical approaches to performativity to explore what might be going wrong, I then draw on Derrida’s and Haraway’s understandings of social change in order (...)
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  11. Christopher Belshaw (2001). Environmental Philosophy: Reason, Nature, and Human Concern. Acumen.
    As anxiety about environmental change and its effects grows, we need to understand both the scientific processes and the ethical and aesthetic judgments involved in deciding which changes we should welcome and promote and which we should try to avoid. In Environmental Philosophy Christopher Belshaw examines the current debates on the environment, focusing on questions of value while also taking into account relevant issues in epistemology and metaphysics. Beginning with an overview of current concerns, Belshaw locates our attitudes toward the (...)
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  12. Donato Bergandi & Patrick Blandin (2012). De la protection de la nature au développement durable : Genèse d'un oxymore éthique et politique. Revue d'Histoire des Sciences 1 (1):103-142.
    Le concept de développement durable s’enracine dans l’histoire des mouvements de préservation de la nature et de conservation des ressources naturelles et de leurs relations avec les sciences de la nature, en particulier l’écologie. En tant que paradigme sociétal, à la fois écologique, politique et économique, il se présente comme un projet politique idéal applicable à l’ensemble des sociétés, qui prétend dépasser l’opposition entre ces deux visions profondément divergentes des relations homme‑nature. L’analyse des textes internationaux pertinents permet de dégager les (...)
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  13. Donato Bergandi & Fabienne Galangau-Quérat (2008). Le développement durable : Les racines environnementalistes d’un paradigme. Aster 46:31-43.
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  14. Arnold Berleant (2007). The Soft Side of Stone. Environmental Philosophy 4 (1/2):49-58.
    Stone represents the firmness and intransigence of the world within which we live and act. But beyond the perception and appropriations of stone, diverse meanings lie hidden between the hardness of stone and its uses. At the same time meaning must be grounded in the stabilizing presence of a common world. Yet if all that can be said is not about stone simpliciter but only an aesthetics of its perception, uses, and meanings, have we not gained the whole world but (...)
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  15. Lorenzo Bianchi (ed.) (2005). Natura E Storia. Liguori.
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  16. Fabrizio Bigotti (2009). La Mente Che Ordina I Segni: Ricerche Sui Problemi Della Forma Nella Filosofia Naturale da Aristotele a Linneo. Aracne.
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  17. Kristina Blennow, Johannes Persson, Annika Wallin, Niklas Vareman & Erik Persson (2014). Understanding Risk in Forest Ecosystem Services: Implications for Effective Risk Management, Communication and Planning. Forestry 87:219-228.
    Uncertainty, insufficient information or information of poor quality, limited cognitive capacity and time, along with value conflicts and ethical considerations, are all aspects thatmake risk managementand riskcommunication difficult. This paper provides a review of different risk concepts and describes how these influence risk management, communication and planning in relation to forest ecosystem services. Based on the review and results of empirical studies, we suggest that personal assessment of risk is decisive in the management of forest ecosystem services. The results are (...)
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  18. Greg Bognar (2011). Respect for Nature. Ethics, Policy and Environment 14 (2):147 - 149.
    Ethics, Policy & Environment, Volume 14, Issue 2, Page 147-149, June 2011.
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  19. Conrad Bonifazi (1976). A Theology of Things: A Study of Man in His Physical Environment. Greenwood Press.
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  20. Francisco Brennand (1990). Diálogos Do Paraíso Perdido. Prefeitura Da Cidade Do Recife.
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  21. Brett Buchanan (2008). Onto-Ethologies: The Animal Environments of Uexküll, Heidegger, Merleau-Ponty, and Deleuze. State University of New York Press.
    Jakob von Uexküll's theories of life -- Biography and historical background -- Nature's conformity with plan -- Umweltforschung -- Biosemiotics -- Concluding remarks -- Marking a path into the environments of animals -- The essential approach to the organism -- Heidegger and the biologists -- Paths to the world -- Disruptive behavior : Heidegger and the captivated animal -- The worldless stone -- The poor animal -- For example, three bees and a lark -- Animal morphology -- A shocking wealth (...)
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  22. Giuseppe Butera (ed.) (2011). Reading the Cosmos: Nature, Science, and Wisdom. Distributed by the Catholic University of America Press.
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  23. Craig G. Buttke (2006). The Death of Our Planet's Species. Environmental Philosophy 3 (1):82-83.
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  24. Elio Cadelo (ed.) (2008). Idea di Natura: 13 Scienziati a Confronto. Marsilio.
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  25. J. Baird Callicott (1995). Intrinsic Value in Nature: A Metaethical Analysis. Electronic Journal of Analytic Philosophy 3 (5).
  26. W. S. K. Cameron (2004). Nature by Design. Environmental Philosophy 1 (1):84-86.
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  27. Noel Castree (2013). Making Sense of Nature. Routledge.
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  28. Gérard Chazal (ed.) (2011). Les Lumières Et l'Idée de la Nature. Editions Universitaires de Dijon.
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  29. Andreas Christiansen (forthcoming). Similarity Arguments in the Genetic Modification Debate. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice:1-17.
    In the ethical debate on genetic modification, it is common to encounter the claim that some anti-GM argument would also apply an established, ethically accepted technology, and that the anti-GM argument is therefore unsuccessful. The paper discusses whether this argumentative strategy, the Similarity Argument, is sound. It presents a logically valid, generic form of the Similarity Argument and then shows that it is subject to three types of objection: It does not respect the difference between pro tanto reasons and all-things-considered (...)
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  30. L. G. Chubrikov (2010). Bog, Vselennai͡a, Zhiznʹ.
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  31. J. J. Clarke (ed.) (1994). Voices of the Earth: An Anthology of Ideas and Arguments. G. Braziller.
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  32. Thomas Cobb (1977). The Meaning of Nature: A Survey of the Western Approach. Agassiz Centre for Water Studies, University of Manitoba.
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  33. James S. Cochran (1989). Beyond Civilization: The End of the Hierarchical Imagination. Van Gorcum.
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  34. Daniel Coren (2015). Anthropocentric Biocentrism in a Hybrid. Ethics and the Environment 20 (2):48-60.
    Anthropocentric biocentrism says that human beings ought to promote the survival of our own species above the survival of other species. But those who attack AB sometimes take it to say something much stronger: we ought to promote our species’ various desires, interests, and goals. I call the latter view AB+. I argue that AB and anti-AB+ are not only mutually compatible but in some respects mutually complementary, such that there are good prospects for combining them into a hybrid-view. After (...)
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  35. Robert S. Corrington (2000). A Semiotic Theory of Theology and Philosophy. Cambridge University Press.
    The concern of this work is with developing an alternative to standard categories in theology and philosophy, especially in terms of how they deal with nature. Avoiding the polemics of much contemporary reflection on nature, it shows how we are connected to nature through the unconscious and its unique way of reading and processing signs. Spinoza's key distinction between natura naturans and natura naturata serves as the governing framework for the treatise. Suggestions are made for a post-Christian way of understanding (...)
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  36. Annabella D'Atri (2008). Vita E Artificio: La Filosofia di Fronte a Natura E Tecnica. Bur.
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  37. Wellington Amâncio da Silva (2014). Representations of Nature in Human Culture. American Journal of Human Ecology 3 (1):10--16.
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  38. Lorraine Daston & Fernando Vidal (eds.) (2004). The Moral Authority of Nature. University of Chicago Press.
    For thousands of years, people have used nature to justify their political, moral, and social judgments. Such appeals to the moral authority of nature are still very much with us today, as heated debates over genetically modified organisms and human cloning testify. The Moral Authority of Nature offers a wide-ranging account of how people have used nature to think about what counts as good, beautiful, just, or valuable. The eighteen essays cover a diverse array of topics, including the connection of (...)
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  39. Paul Sheldon Davies (2009). Subjects of the World: Darwin's Rhetoric and the Study of Agency in Nature. The University of Chicago Press.
    Part one: A progressive orientation: naturalism as exploration -- The vividness of truth: Darwin's romantic rhetoric and the evolutionary framework -- Our most vexing problem: conceptual conservatism and conceptual imperialism -- Naturalism as exploration: the elements of reform -- Part two: The allure of agency: "purpose" in biology -- The real heart of Darwinian evolutionary biology -- A formative power of a self-propagating kind: natural purposes and the concept location project -- A persistent mode of understanding: the psychological power of (...)
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  40. Godefroid de Callataÿ (1996). Annus Platonicus: A Study of World Cycles in Greek, Latin, and Arabic Sources. Université Catholique De Louvain, Institut Orientaliste.
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  41. Amy Dean (1997). Natural Acts: Reconnecting with Nature to Recover Community, Spirit, and Self. M. Evans.
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  42. Glenn Deliège (2007). Toward a Richer Account of Restorative Practices. Environmental Philosophy 4 (1/2):135-147.
    In this paper, I investigate the possibility of a rich account of ecological restoration. Starting from the apparent one-sided focus on science and technology within the nature conservation community in Flanders, Belgium, I first present an intuitive case against a restorative practice solely based on science and technology. I then argue that what constitutes good restorative practice must be informed by the historical Arcadian tradition in which nature appreciation and subsequent conservation in the West have taken shape. However, the way (...)
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  43. Henry Dicks (2016). The Philosophy of Biomimicry. Philosophy and Technology 29 (3):223-243.
    The philosophy of biomimicry, I argue, consists of four main areas of inquiry. The first, which has already been explored by Freya Mathews, concerns the “deep” question of what Nature ultimately is. The second, third, and fourth areas correspond to the three basic principles of biomimicry as laid out by Janine Benyus. “Nature as model” is the poetic principle of biomimicry, for it tells us how it is that things are to be “brought forth”. “Nature as measure” is the ethical (...)
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  44. Henry Dicks (2014). Aldo Leopold and the Ecological Imaginary. Environmental Philosophy 11 (2):175-209.
    Aldo Leopold accorded great significance to the images he used to describe both the land and humankind’s relation to it. Focusing on three key images of Leopold’s “ecological imaginary”—the balance, the pyramid, and the round river—this article argues that the most profound of these is the round river. Contrasting this image with James Lovelock’s portrayal of the earth as Gaia, it further argues that Leopold’s round river can be interpreted as a contemporary, ecological reworking of the primordial, Homeric experience of (...)
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  45. Ben Dixon (2016). Deriving Moral Considerability From Leopold’s A Sand County Almanac. Ethics, Policy and Environment 19 (2):196-212.
    I argue that a reasonable understanding of Leopold’s ‘Land Ethic’ is one that identifies possession of health as being a sufficient condition for moral consideration. With this, Leopold extends morality not only to biotic wholes, but to individual organisms, as both can have their health undermined. My argument centers on explaining why Leopold thinks it reasonable to analogize ecosystems both to an organism and to a community: both have a health. My conclusions undermine J. Baird Callicott’s rhetorical dismissal of the (...)
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  46. Andrej Drapal (2009). Kako Stvari Vznikajo: Od Mema Do Provanse: Od Kasa Do Reda: Iz Ušes in Prek Možganov V Tvoja Usta. Valenovak.
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  47. Willem B. Drees (ed.) (2003). Is Nature Ever Evil?: Religion, Science, and Value. Routledge.
    Can one call nature 'evil'? Or is life a matter of eating and being eaten, where value judgments should not be applied? Is nature beautiful? Or is beauty in the eye of the beholder? Scientists often pretend that their disciplines only describe and analyze natural processes in factual terms, without making evaluative statements regarding reality. However, scientists may also be driven by the beauty of that which they study. Or they may be appalled by suffering they encounter, and look for (...)
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  48. Martin Drenthen (2016). The Return of the Wild in the Anthropocene. Wolf Resurgence in the Netherlands. Ethics, Policy and Environment 18 (3):318-337.
    In most rewilding projects, humans are still the agents in control: it is us who decide to no longer want to fully control nature. Spontaneous rewilding changes the nature of this game. Once we are confronted with species that have their own agency, that cannot fully be controlled, and that behave in ways that we do not always like, then it proves hard to co-exist and tolerate nature’s autonomy. Nowhere is this more clearly visible than with the resurging wolf, whose (...)
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  49. Martin Drenthen (2002). Nietzsche and the Paradox of Environmental Ethics: Nietzsche's View of Nature and Morality. New Nietzsche Studies 5 (1/2):12-25.
    In this paper, I offer a systematic inquiry into the significance of Nietzsche's philosophy to environmental ethics. Nietzsche's philosophy of nature is, I believe, relevant today because it makes explicit a fundamental ambiguity that is also characteristic of our current understanding of nature. I show how the current debate between traditional environmental ethics and postmodern environmental philosophy can be interpreted as a symptom of this ambiguity. I argue that, in light of Nietzsche's critique of morality, environmental ethics is a highly (...)
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  50. Antoine C. Dussault, Ecocentrism and Appeals to Nature's Goodness: Must They Be Fallacious?
1 — 50 / 150