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  1. James S. Albus (2010). Reverse Engineering the Brain. International Journal of Machine Consciousness 2 (02):193-211.
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  2. Micah Allen & Gary Williams (2011). Consciousness, Plasticity, and Connectomics: The Role of Intersubjectivity in Human Cognition. Frontiers in Psychology 2 (20).
    Consciousness is typically construed as being explainable purely in terms of either private, raw feels or higher-order, reflective representations. In contrast to this false dichotomy, we propose a new view of consciousness as an interactive, plastic phenomenon open to sociocultural influence. We take up our account of consciousness from the observation of radical cortical neuroplasticity in human development. Accordingly, we draw upon recent research on macroscopic neural networks, including the “default mode”, to illustrate cases in which an individual’s particular “connectome” (...)
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  3. Ammar Al‐Chalabi & Christopher C. J. Miller (2003). Neurofilaments and Neurological Disease. Bioessays 25 (4):346-355.
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  4. Agnès Aubert, Robert Costalat, Hugues Duffau & Habib Benali (2002). Modeling of Pathophysiological Coupling Between Brain Electrical Activation, Energy Metabolism and Hemodynamics: Insights for the Interpretation of Intracerebral Tumor Imaging. Acta Biotheoretica 50 (4).
    Gliomas can display marked changes in the concentrations of energy metabolism molecules such as creatine (Cr), phosphocreatine (PCr) and lactate, as measured using magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS). Moreover, the BOLD (blood oxygen level dependent) contrast enhancement in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) can be reduced or missing within or near gliomas, while neural activity is not significantly reduced (so-called neurovascular decoupling), so that the location of functionally eloquent areas using fMRI can be erroneous. In this paper, we adapt a previously (...)
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  5. Agnès Aubert, Robert Costalat & Romain Valabrègue (2001). Modelling of the Coupling Between Brain Electrical Activity and Metabolism. Acta Biotheoretica 49 (4).
    In order to make an attempt at grouping the various aspects of brain functional imaging (fMRI, MRS, EEG-MEG, ...) within a coherent frame, we implemented a model consisting of a system of differential equations, that includes: (1) sodium membrane transport, (2) Na/K ATPase, (3) neuronal energy metabolism (i.e. glycolysis, buffering effect of phosphocreatine, and mitochondrial respiration), (4) blood-brain barrier exchanges and (5) brain hemodynamics, all the processes which are involved in the activation of brain areas. We assumed that the correlation (...)
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  6. M. Aubert, M. Badoual & B. Grammaticos (2008). A Model for Short- and Long-Range Interactions of Migrating Tumour Cell. Acta Biotheoretica 56 (4).
    We examine the consequences of long-range effects on tumour cell migration. Our starting point are previous results of ours where we have shown that the migration patterns of glioma cells are best interpreted if one assumes attractive interactions between cells. Here we complement the cellular automaton model previously introduced by the assumption of the existence of a chemorepellent produced by the main bulk of large spheroids (in the hypoxic/necrotic areas). Visible effects due to the presence of such a substance can (...)
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  7. Gerd Bicker (2005). STOP and GO with NO: Nitric Oxide as a Regulator of Cell Motility in Simple Brains. Bioessays 27 (5):495-505.
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  8. Robert Briscoe (2010). Perceiving the Present: Systematization of Illusions or Illusion of Systematization? Cognitive Science 34 (8):1530-1542.
    Mark Changizi et al. (2008) claim that it is possible systematically to organize more than 50 kinds of illusions in a 7 × 4 matrix of 28 classes. This systematization, they further maintain, can be explained by the operation of a single visual processing latency correction mechanism that they call “perceiving the present” (PTP). This brief report raises some concerns about the way a number of illusions are classified by the proposed systematization. It also poses two general problems—one empirical and (...)
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  9. Robert Briscoe (2009). Egocentric Spatial Representation in Action and Perception. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 79 (2):423 - 460.
    Neuropsychological findings used to motivate the "two visual systems" hypothesis have been taken to endanger a pair of widely accepted claims about spatial representation in conscious visual experience. The first is the claim that visual experience represents 3-D space around the perceiver using an egocentric frame of reference. The second is the claim that there is a constitutive link between the spatial contents of visual experience and the perceiver's bodily actions. In this paper, I review and assess three main sources (...)
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  10. D. A. Brown (1999). One for the Neuroscientist. Bioessays 21 (4):361-361.
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  11. Elliot C. Brown & Martin Brüne (2012). Evolution of Social Predictive Brains? Frontiers in Psychology 3 (414).
    A commentary on: -/- Whatever next? Predictive brains, situated agents, and the future of cognitive science, by Clark, A. (in press). Behav. Brain Sci.
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  12. Elliot Clayton Brown, Jan Roelf Wiersema, Gilles Pourtois & Martin Brüne (2013). Modulation of Motor Cortex Activity When Observing Rewarding and Punishing Actions. Neuropsychologia 51 (1):52-58.
    Interpreting others' actions is essential for understanding the intentions and goals in social interactions. Activity in the motor cortex is evoked when we see another person performing actions, which can also be influenced by the intentions and context of the observed action. No study has directly explored the influence of reward and punishment on motor cortex activity when observing others' actions, which is likely to have substantial relevance in different social contexts. In this experiment, EEG was recorded while participants watched (...)
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  13. Nicolas J. Bullot & Rolf Reber (2013). The Artful Mind Meets Art History: Toward a Psycho-Historical Framework for the Science of Art Appreciation. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 36 (2):123-180.
    Research seeking a scientific foundation for the theory of art appreciation has raised controversies at the intersection of the social and cognitive sciences. Though equally relevant to a scientific inquiry into art appreciation, psychological and historical approaches to art developed independently and lack a common core of theoretical principles. Historicists argue that psychological and brain sciences ignore the fact that artworks are artifacts produced and appreciated in the context of unique historical situations and artistic intentions. After revealing flaws in the (...)
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  14. Pico Caroni (1997). Intrinsic Neuronal Determinants That Promotes Axonal Sprouting and Elongation. Bioessays 19 (9):767-775.
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  15. J. Demongeot, D. Benaouda, O. Nérot & C. Jézéquel (1994). Random Simulation and Confiners: Their Application to Neural Networks. Acta Biotheoretica 42 (2-3).
    Random simulation of complex dynamical systems is generally used in order to obtain information about their asymptotic behaviour (i.e., when time or size of the system tends towards infinity). A fortunate and welcome circumstance in most of the systems studied by physicists, biologists, and economists is the existence of an invariant measure in the state space allowing determination of the frequency with which observation of asymptotic states is possible. Regions found between contour lines of the surface density of this invariant (...)
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  16. Sue Deuchars & Jim Deuchars (1998). Neuroscience-a Novelty for the Nervous: Neuroscience (1997). Purves D, Augustine GJ, Fitzpatrick D, Katz LC, LaMantia A-S, McNamara JO (Eds). Sunderland, MA: Sinauer Associates, Inc. 562 Pp. [REVIEW] Bioessays 20 (10):871-872.
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  17. Mauro DiNuzzo, Bruno Maraviglia & Federico Giove (2011). Why Does the Brain (Not) Have Glycogen? Bioessays 33 (5):319-326.
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  18. J. L. Dubbeldam (1993). Brain Organization and Behaviour. Acta Biotheoretica 41 (4).
    Central question of this essay is, whether it is possible to relate specific aspects of the organization of sensorimotor systems to specific aspects of the behaviour. The role of the auditory system as part of a system for vocalization (song-birds) or as part of a system for prey localization (owls) and the different roles of the trigeminal system in the feeding behaviour of different birds are considered. The ascending sensory systems seem to possess a comparable organization in the various (...)
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  19. Mirko Farina (2013). Neither Touch nor Vision: Sensory Substitution as Artificial Synaesthesia? Biology and Philosophy 28 (4):639-655.
    Block (Trends Cogn Sci 7:285–286, 2003) and Prinz (PSYCHE 12:1–19, 2006) have defended the idea that SSD perception remains in the substituting modality (auditory or tactile). Hurley and Noë (Biol Philos 18:131–168, 2003) instead argued that after substantial training with the device, the perceptual experience that the SSD user enjoys undergoes a change, switching from tactile/auditory to visual. This debate has unfolded in something like a stalemate where, I will argue, it has become difficult to determine whether the perception acquired (...)
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  20. Joerg Fingerhut, Sabine Flach & Jan Söffner (2011). Synaesthesia and Kinaesthetics. Peter Lang.
    A myriad of sensations inform and direct us when we engage with the environment. To understand their influence on the development of our habitus it is important to focus on unifying processes in sensing. This approach allows us to include phenomena that elude a rather narrow view that focuses on each of the five discrete senses in isolation. One of the central questions addressed in this volume is whether there is something like a sensual habitus, and if there is, how (...)
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  21. K. M. Franks & T. J. Sejnowski (2002). Communication in Neuronal Networks. Bioessays 12:1130.
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  22. J. Germana (forthcoming). Wittgenstein Zen: Application to the Scientific Distinction of Two Modes of Human Consciousness Based on Brain Hemispheric Differences. Behaviorism.
    Discusses 2 modes of human consciousness that have been postulated by the modern scientific theory of brain hemispheric differences. Problems and solutions that exemplify the distinct functions assigned to the modes are outlined.
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  23. Philip Gerrans & Jeanette Kennett (2010). Neurosentimentalism and Moral Agency. Mind 119 (475):585-614.
    Metaethics has recently been confronted by evidence from cognitive neuroscience that tacit emotional processes play an essential causal role in moral judgement. Most neuroscientists, and some metaethicists, take this evidence to vindicate a version of metaethical sentimentalism. In this paper we argue that the ‘dual process’ model of cognition that frames the discussion within and without philosophy does not do justice to an important constraint on any theory of deliberation and judgement. Namely, decision-making is the exercise of a capacity for (...)
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  24. James Giordano (2013). Unpacking Neuroscience and Neurotechnology - Instructions Not Included: Neuroethics Required. Neuroethics 6 (2):411-414.
    Using a metaphorical reminiscence upon holiday toys - and the hopes, challenges and possibilities they presented - this essay addresses the ways that the heuristics, outcomes and products of neuroscience have effected change in the human condition, predicament, and being. A note of caution is offered to pragmatically assess what can be done with neurotechnology, what can't, and what should and shouldn't - based upon the capacities and limitations of both the science, and our collective ability to handle knowledge, power (...)
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  25. Matthew G. Gold (2012). A Frontier in the Understanding of Synaptic Plasticity: Solving the Structure of the Postsynaptic Density. Bioessays 34 (7):599-608.
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  26. Seth G. N. Grant (2003). Synapse Signalling Complexes and Networks: Machines Underlying Cognition. Bioessays 25 (12):1229-1235.
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  27. Stephen Grossberg (2006). The Art of Seeing and Painting. Technical Report.
    The human urge to represent the three-dimensional world using two-dimensional pictorial representations dates back at least to Paleolithic times. Artists from ancient to modern times have struggled to understand how a few contours or color patches on a flat surface can induce mental representations of a three-dimensional scene. This article summarizes some of the recent breakthroughs in scientifically understanding how the brain sees that shed light on these struggles. These breakthroughs illustrate how various artists have intuitively understand paradoxical properties about (...)
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  28. Stuart Hameroff, Naughty Quantum Robot!
    Stuart Hameroff, M.D., is a doctor of medicine, a professor of anesthesiology and psychology, as well as associate director of the Center for Consciousness Studies at University of Arizona. Through a collaboration with mathematical physicist, Prof Sir Roger Penrose, Prof Hameroff is leading the assault on mainstream thinking about the human mind and how it is that we come to be. Forget space exploration. Forget biotechnology. Forget nanobots. Forget sea monkeys. The final frontier of science is reading this article right (...)
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  29. Kenneth J. Hayworth (2012). Electron Imaging Technology for Whole Brain Neural Circuit Mapping. International Journal of Machine Consciousness 4 (01):87-108.
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  30. Ulf Hlobil, Chaturbhuj Rathore, Aley Alexander, Sankara Sarma & Kurupath Radhakrishnan (2008). Impaired Facial Emotion Recognition in Patients with Mesial Temporal Lobe Epilepsy Associated with Hippocampal Sclerosis (MTLE-HS): Side and Age at Onset Matters. Epilepsy Research 80 (2-3):150–157.
    To define the determinants of impaired facial emotion recognition (FER) in patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy associated with hippocampal sclerosis (MTLE-HS), we examined 76 patients with unilateral MTLE-HS, 36 prior to antero-mesial temporal lobectomy (AMTL) and 40 after AMTL, and 28 healthy control subjects with a FER test consisting of 60 items (20 each for anger, fear, and happiness). Mean percentages of the accurate responses were calculated for different subgroups: right vs. left MTLE-HS, early (age at onset <6 years) (...)
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  31. Jakob Hohwy (forthcoming). Prediction Error Minimization, Mental and Developmental Disorder, and Statistical Theories of Consciousness. In Rocco Gennaro (ed.), Disturbed Consciousness: New Essays on Psychopathology and Theories of Consciousness. MIT Press.
    This chapter seeks to recover an approach to consciousness from a general theory of brain function, namely the prediction error minimization theory. The way this theory applies to mental and developmental disorder demonstrates its relevance to consciousness. The resulting view is discussed in relation to a contemporary theory of consciousness, namely the idea that conscious perception depends on Bayesian metacognition; this theory is also supported by considerations of psychopathology. This Bayesian theory is first disconnected from the higher-order thought theory, and (...)
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  32. Jakob Hohwy (2012). Attention and Conscious Perception in the Hypothesis Testing Brain. Frontiers in Psychology 3 (96).
    Conscious perception and attention are difficult to study, partly because their relation to each other is not fully understood. Rather than conceiving and studying them in isolation from each other it may be useful to locate them in an independently motivated, general framework, from which a principled account of how they relate can then transpire. Accordingly, these mental phenomena are here reviewed through the prism of the increasingly influential predictive coding framework. On this framework, conscious perception can be seen as (...)
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  33. Kevin S. Holloway (2012). Opioid Mediation of Learned Sexual Behavior. Socioaffective Neuroscience and Psychology 2.
    Identifying the role of opioids in the mediation of learned sexual behaviors has been complicated by the use of differing methodologies in the investigations. In this review addressing multiple species, techniques, and pharmaceutical manipulations, several features of opioid mediation become apparent. Opioids are differentially involved in conditioned and unconditioned sexual behaviors. The timing of the delivery of a sexual reinforcer during conditioning trials, especially those using male subjects, acutely influences the role that opioids have in learning. Opioids may be particularly (...)
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  34. Jim Hopkins (2012). Psychoanalysis Representation and Neuroscience: The Freudian Unconscious and the Bayesian Brain. In A. Fotopoulu, D. Pfaff & M. Conway (eds.), From the Couch to the Lab: Psychoanalysis, Neuroscience and Cognitive Psychology in Dialoge. OUP.
    This paper argues that recent work in the 'free energy' program in neuroscience enables us better to understand both consciousness and the Freudian unconscious, including the role of the superego and the id. This work also accords with research in developmental psychology (particularly attachment theory) and with evolutionary considerations bearing on emotional conflict. This argument is carried forward in various ways in the work that follows, including 'Understanding and Healing', 'The Significance of Consilience', 'Psychoanalysis, Philosophical Issues', and 'Kantian Neuroscience and (...)
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  35. Mark Jensen, Alexander P. Cox, Naveed Chaudhry, Marcus Ng, Donat Sule Ray, William Duncan, Patrick, Bianca Weinstock-Guttman, Barry Smith, Alan Ruttenberg, Kinga Szigeti & Alexander D. Diehl (2013). The Neurological Disease Ontology. Journal of Biomedical Semantics 4 (42).
    We are developing the Neurological Disease Ontology (ND) to provide a framework to enable representation of aspects of neurological diseases that are relevant to their treatment and study. ND is a representational tool that addresses the need for unambiguous annotation, storage, and retrieval of data associated with the treatment and study of neurological diseases. ND is being developed in compliance with the Open Biomedical Ontology Foundry principles and builds upon the paradigm established by the Ontology for General Medical Science (OGMS) (...)
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  36. Stuart Katz & Gordon Frost (1979). The Origins of Knowledge in Two Theories of Brain: The Cognitive Paradox Revealed. Behaviorism 7 (2):35-44.
  37. Stan Klein (forthcoming). Autonoetic Consciousness: Re-Considering the Role of Episodic Memory in Future-Oriented Self-Projection. Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology.
    Following the seminal work of Ingvar (1985), Suddendorf (1994) and Tulving (1985), exploration of the ability to anticipate and prepare for future contingencies that cannot be known with certainty has grown into a thriving research enterprise. A fundamental tenet of this line of inquiry is that future-oriented mental time travel, in most of its presentations, is underwritten by a property or an extension of episodic recollection. However, a careful conceptual analysis of exactly how episodic memory functions in this capacity has (...)
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  38. Stan Klein (2014). What Memory Is. WIREs Cognitive Science 5 (2):1-38.
    I argue that our current practice of ascribing the term “memory” to mental states and processes lacks epistemic warrant. Memory, according to the “received view”, is any state or process that results from the sequential stages of encoding, storage and retrieval. By these criteria, memory, or its footprint, can be seen in virtually every mental state we are capable of having. This, I argue, stretches the term to the breaking point. I draw on phenomenological, historical and conceptual considerations to make (...)
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  39. Stan Klein, Leda Cosmides, John Tooby & Sarah Chance (2002). Decisions and the Evolution of Memory: Multiple Systems, Multiple Functions. Psychological Review 109:306-329.
    Memory evolved to supply useful, timely information to the organism’s decision-making systems. Therefore, decision rules, multiple memory systems, and the search engines that link them should have coevolved to mesh in a coadapted, functionally interlocking way. This adaptationist perspective suggested the scope hypothesis: When a generalization is retrieved from semantic memory, episodic memories that are inconsistent with it should be retrieved in tandem to place boundary conditions on the scope of the generalization. Using a priming paradigm and a decision task (...)
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  40. Stan Klein & Cynthia Gangi (2010). The Multiplicity of Self: Neuropsychological Evidence and its Implications for the Self as a Construct in Psychological Research. Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences 1191:1-15.
    This paper examines the issue ofwhat the self is by reviewing neuropsychological research,which converges on the idea that the selfmay be more complex and differentiated than previous treatments of the topic have suggested. Although some aspects of self-knowledge such as episodic recollection may be compromised in individuals, other aspects—for instance, semantic trait summaries—appear largely intact. Taken together, these findings support the idea that the self is not a single, unified entity. Rather, it is a set of interrelated, functionally independent systems. (...)
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  41. Cynthia Kraus (2012). Critical Studies of the Sexed Brain: A Critique of What and for Whom? [REVIEW] Neuroethics 5 (3):247-259.
    The NeuroGenderings project is reminiscent of an interdisciplinary program called Critical Neuroscience. But the steps towards a feminist/queer Critical Neuroscience are complicated by the problematic ways in which critical neuroscientists conceive of their critical practices. They suggest that we work and talk across disciplines as if neuroscientists were from Mars and social scientists from Venus, assigning the latter to the traditional feminine role of assuaging conflict. This article argues that brain science studies scholars need to clarify how we want to (...)
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  42. Gabriel Kreiman (2001). Enchanted Looms: Conscious Networks in Brains and Computers. Bioessays 23 (6):558-558.
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  43. Morten L. Kringelbach & Kent C. Berridge (2011). The Neurobiology of Pleasure and Happiness. In Judy Illes & Barbara J. Sahakian (eds.), Oxford Handbook of Neuroethics. Oxford University Press. 15.
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  44. Federico Langer (2012). Mental Imagery, Emotion, and Literary Task Sets Clues Towards a Literary Neuroart. Journal of Consciousness Studies 19 (7-8):168-215.
  45. Paul Lewis (2012). In Defence of Aristotle on Character: Toward a Synthesis of Recent Psychology, Neuroscience and the Thought of Michael Polanyi. Journal of Moral Education 41 (2):155-170.
    In the United States, various forms of character education have become popular in both elementary and professional education. They are often criticised, however, for their reliance on Aristotle, who is said to be problematic at several points. In response to these criticisms, I argue that Aristotle?s ancient account of character and its formation remains viable in light of work over the last decade in psychology and the neurosciences. However, some lacunae remain that can at least be partially filled with insights (...)
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  46. Jun Z. Li (2014). Circadian Rhythms and Mood: Opportunities for Multi-Level Analyses in Genomics and Neuroscience. Bioessays 36 (3):305-315.
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  47. E. A. Liberman & S. V. Minina (1997). Cell Molecular Quantum Computer and Principles of New Science. World Futures 50 (1):583-590.
    It is proposed that the controlling system of the nerve cell is a molecular quantum device with an inner point of view. For the description of such a system it is necessary to create new science.
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  48. Robin Mackenzie (2011). The Neuroethics of Pleasure and Addiction in Public Health Strategies Moving Beyond Harm Reduction: Funding the Creation of Non-Addictive Drugs and Taxonomies of Pleasure. Neuroethics 4 (2):103-117.
    We are unlikely to stop seeking pleasure, as this would prejudice our health and well-being. Yet many psychoactive substances providing pleasure are outlawed as illicit recreational drugs, despite the fact that only some of them are addictive to some people. Efforts to redress their prohibition, or to reform legislation so that penalties are proportionate to harm have largely failed. Yet, if choices over seeking pleasure are ethical insofar as they avoid harm to oneself or others, public health strategies should foster (...)
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  49. C. T. Mcmillan, R. Clark, P. Moore, C. Devita & M. Grossman (2005). Neural Basis for Generalized Quantifiers Comprehension. Neuropsychologia 43:1729--1737.
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  50. C. T. Mcmillan, R. Clark, P. Moore & M. Grossman (2006). Quantifiers Comprehension in Corticobasal Degeneration. Brain and Cognition 65:250--260.
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