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  1. S. V. Adamovich & A. G. Feldman (1989). The Prerequisites for One-Jint Motor Control Theories. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 12 (2):210.
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  2. W. Ross Adey (1979). Hippocampal Theta and Organism-Environment Interaction. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 2 (3):322.
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  3. John P. Aggleton & John M. Pearce (2002). Neural Systems Underlying Episodic Memory: Insights From Animal Research. In Alan Baddeley, John Aggleton & Martin Conway (eds.), Episodic Memory: New Directions in Research. OUP Oxford
    Two strategies used to uncover neural systems for episodic-like memory in animals are discussed: (i) an attribute of episodic memory (what? when? where?) is examined in order to reveal the neuronal interactions supporting that component of memory; and (ii) the connections of a structure thought to be central to episodic memory in humans are studied at a level of detail not feasible in humans. By focusing on spatial memory (where?) and the hippocampus, it has proved possible to bring the strategies (...)
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  4. F. Aiple & B. Fischer (1989). Synchrony of Spikes and Attention in Visual Cortex. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 12 (3):397.
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  5. Morana Alač (2004). Negotiating Pictures of Numbers. Social Epistemology 18 (2-3):199-214.
    This paper reports on objectivity and knowledge production in the process of submitting, revising, and publishing an experimental research article in cognitive neuroscience. The review process, as part of scientific practice, is of particular interest, since it puts the research team in direct dialog with a larger scientific community concerned with fMRI evidence. By bringing this often ?black?boxed? dimension of the manuscript?s production into the picture, I illustrate the role that the visual brain representations played in the practice of scientific (...)
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  6. Arlene D. Albert & Philip L. Yeagle (1995). The Determination of Rhodopsin Structure May Require Alternative Approaches. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 18 (3):469-469.
    The structure of rhodopsin is a subject of intense interest. Solving the structure by traditional methods has proved exceedingly challenging. It may therefore be useful to confront the problem by a combination of alternate techniques. These include FTIR (Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy) and AFM (atomic force microscopy) on the intact protein. Furthermore, additional insights may be gained through structural investigations of discrete rhodopsin domains.
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  7. James S. Albus (2010). Reverse Engineering the Brain. International Journal of Machine Consciousness 2 (2):193-211.
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  8. André Aleman (2005). Feelings You Can't Imagine: Towards a Cognitive Neuroscience of Alexithymia. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 9 (12):553-555.
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  9. Ammar Al‐Chalabi & Christopher C. J. Miller (2003). Neurofilaments and Neurological Disease. Bioessays 25 (4):346-355.
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  10. Elissa M. Aminoff, Kestutis Kveraga & Moshe Bar (2013). The Role of the Parahippocampal Cortex in Cognition. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 17 (8):379-390.
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  11. Katrin Amunts & Karl Zilles (2012). Architecture and Organizational Principles of Broca's Region. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 16 (8):418-426.
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  12. K. Anders Ericsson (2003). Exceptional Memorizers: Made, Not Born. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 7 (6):233-235.
    In a recent study, Maguire and colleagues failed to find systematic differences in brain anatomy between world-class memory performers and matched control subjects. The world-class performers exhibited distinctive patterns of brain activation during memorization, but these patterns were directly attributable to the experts' unique encoding strategies and acquired memory skills. Discussed here are the implications for broad attainability of highly skilled memory performance in professional and everyday activities.
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  13. R. A. Andersen, J. W. Burdick, S. Musallam, B. Pesaran & J. G. Cham (2004). Cognitive Neural Prosthetics. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 8 (11):486-493.
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  14. Britt Anderson, Anjan Chatterjee & George Graham (1995). Neural Transplants Are Grey Matters. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 18 (1):46-47.
    The lesion and transplantation data cited by Sinden et al., when considered in tandem, seem to harbor an internal inconsistency, raising questions of false localization of function. The extrapolation of such data to cognitive impairment and potential treatment strategies in Alzheimer's disease is problematic. Patients with focal basal forebrain lesions (e.g., anterior communicating artery aneurysm rupture) might be a more appropriate target population.
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  15. Michael C. Anderson & Simon Hanslmayr (2014). Neural Mechanisms of Motivated Forgetting. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 18 (6):279-292.
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  16. Michael L. Anderson (2010). Neural Reuse: A Fundamental Organizational Principle of the Brain. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 33 (4):245.
    An emerging class of theories concerning the functional structure of the brain takes the reuse of neural circuitry for various cognitive purposes to be a central organizational principle. According to these theories, it is quite common for neural circuits established for one purpose to be exapted (exploited, recycled, redeployed) during evolution or normal development, and be put to different uses, often without losing their original functions. Neural reuse theories thus differ from the usual understanding of the role of neural plasticity (...)
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  17. David B. Andrews (1991). Extending Neuropsychology. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 14 (3):439-440.
  18. Daniel Ansari & Annette Karmiloff-Smith (2002). Atypical Trajectories of Number Development: A Neuroconstructivist Perspective. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 6 (12):511-516.
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  19. John Antrobus (1986). Rapid Eye Movements and the Cerebellum. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 9 (3):400.
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  20. A. Vania Apkarian (2013). A Brain Signature for Acute Pain. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 17 (7):309-310.
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  21. Michael A. Arbib (1996). Spanning the Levels in Cerebellar Function. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (3):434-435.
    We ask what cerebellum and basal ganglia arguing that cerebellum tunes motor schemas and their coordination. We argue for a synthesis of models addressing the real-time role and error signaling roles of climbing fibers. bridges between regional and neuro-physiological studies, while relates the neurochemis-try of learning to neural and behavioral levels. [CRÉPEL et al.; HOUK et al.; KANO; LINDEN; SIMPSON et al.; SMITH; THACH; VINCENT].
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  22. Agnès Aubert, Robert Costalat, Hugues Duffau & Habib Benali (2002). Modeling of Pathophysiological Coupling Between Brain Electrical Activation, Energy Metabolism and Hemodynamics: Insights for the Interpretation of Intracerebral Tumor Imaging. Acta Biotheoretica 50 (4):281-295.
    Gliomas can display marked changes in the concentrations of energy metabolism molecules such as creatine (Cr), phosphocreatine (PCr) and lactate, as measured using magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS). Moreover, the BOLD (blood oxygen level dependent) contrast enhancement in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) can be reduced or missing within or near gliomas, while neural activity is not significantly reduced (so-called neurovascular decoupling), so that the location of functionally eloquent areas using fMRI can be erroneous. In this paper, we adapt a previously (...)
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  23. Agnès Aubert, Robert Costalat & Romain Valabrègue (2001). Modelling of the Coupling Between Brain Electrical Activity and Metabolism. Acta Biotheoretica 49 (4):301-326.
    In order to make an attempt at grouping the various aspects of brain functional imaging (fMRI, MRS, EEG-MEG, ...) within a coherent frame, we implemented a model consisting of a system of differential equations, that includes: (1) sodium membrane transport, (2) Na/K ATPase, (3) neuronal energy metabolism (i.e. glycolysis, buffering effect of phosphocreatine, and mitochondrial respiration), (4) blood-brain barrier exchanges and (5) brain hemodynamics, all the processes which are involved in the activation of brain areas. We assumed that the correlation (...)
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  24. M. Aubert, M. Badoual & B. Grammaticos (2008). A Model for Short- and Long-Range Interactions of Migrating Tumour Cell. Acta Biotheoretica 56 (4):297-314.
    We examine the consequences of long-range effects on tumour cell migration. Our starting point are previous results of ours where we have shown that the migration patterns of glioma cells are best interpreted if one assumes attractive interactions between cells. Here we complement the cellular automaton model previously introduced by the assumption of the existence of a chemorepellent produced by the main bulk of large spheroids (in the hypoxic/necrotic areas). Visible effects due to the presence of such a substance can (...)
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  25. William Badecker & Alfonso Caramazza (1985). On Considerations of Method and Theory Governing the Use of Clinical Categories in Neurolinguistics and Cognitive Neuropsychology: The Case Against Agrammatism. Cognition 20 (2):97-125.
  26. Yu Bai, Timothy Lane, Georg Northoff & et al (2015). Resting State Glutamate Predicts Elevated Pre-Stimulus Alpha During Self-Relatedness: A Combined EEG-MRS Study on 'Rest-Self' Overlap. Social Neuroscience:DOI:10.1080/17470919.2015.107258.
    Recent studies have demonstrated neural overlap between resting state activity and self-referential processing. This “rest-self” overlap occurs especially in anterior cortical midline structures like the perigenual anterior cingulate cortex (PACC). However, the exact neurotemporal and biochemical mechanisms remain to be identified. Therefore, we conducted a combined electroencephalography (EEG)-magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) study. EEG focused on pre-stimulus (e.g., prior to stimulus presentation or perception) power changes to assess the degree to which those changes can predict subjects’ perception (and judgment) of subsequent (...)
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  27. David A. Balota, Patrick O. Dolan & Janet M. Duchek (2000). Memory Changes in Healthy Young and Older Adults. In Endel Tulving (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Memory. Oxford University Press 395--410.
    The present chapter provides a review of the literature addressing changes in memory performance in older adults (often retired individuals with an age between 60 and 80 years), compared to younger adults (often college students around age 20). While it is well-established that memory performance declines in older adults (e.g., Kausler, 1994; Ryan, 1992), it is now clear that not all aspects of memory are impaired (e.g., Balota & Duchek, 1988; Burke & Light, 1981; Craik, 1983; Schacter, Kihlstrom, Kaszniak & (...)
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  28. Ann-Sophie Barwich (2015). What is so Special About Smell? Olfaction as a Model System in Neurobiology. Postgraduate Medical Journal 92:27-33.
    Neurobiology studies mechanisms of cell signalling. A key question is how cells recognise specific signals. In this context, olfaction has become an important experimental system over the past 25 years. The olfactory system responds to an array of structurally diverse stimuli. The discovery of the olfactory receptors (ORs), recognising these stimuli, established the olfactory pathway as part of a greater group of signalling mechanisms mediated by G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). GPCRs are the largest protein family in the mammalian genome and involved (...)
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  29. Gerd Bicker (2005). STOP and GO with NO: Nitric Oxide as a Regulator of Cell Motility in Simple Brains. Bioessays 27 (5):495-505.
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  30. R. J. R. Blair (2008). The Amygdala and Ventromedial Prefrontal Cortex: Functional Contributions and Dysfunction in Psychopathy. Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B 363:2557–2565.
    The current paper examines the functional contributions of the amygdala and ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC) and the evidence that the functioning of these systems is compromised in individuals with psychopathy. The amygdala is critical for the formation of stimulus–reinforcement associations, both punishment and reward based, and the processing of emotional expressions. vmPFC is critical for the representation of reinforcement expectancies and, owing to this, decision making. Neuropsychological and neuroimaging data from individuals with psychopathy are examined. It is concluded that these (...)
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  31. Lisa Bortolotti & Rachel Gunn (2015). Philip Gerrans The Measure of Madness: Philosophy of Mind, Cognitive Neuroscience, and Delusional Thought. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science:axv032.
    Review of Phil Gerrans' book on delusions, The Measure of Madness.
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  32. Inti A. Brazil, Rogier B. Mars, Berend H. Bulten, Jan K. Buitelaar, Robbert J. Verkes & Ellen R. A. De Bruijn (2011). A Neurophysiological Dissociation Between Monitoring One’s Own and Others’ Actions in Psychopathy. Biological Psychiatry 69:693–699.
    Monitoring of own behavior is not affected in psychopathy, whereas processing of the outcome of others’ actions is disturbed. Specifically, although psychopathic individuals do not have a problem with initial processing of the actions of others, they have problems with deeper analyses of the consequences of the observed action, possibility related to the reward value of the action. These results suggest that aspects of action monitoring in psychopathy are disturbed in social contexts and possibly play a central role in the (...)
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  33. Maria Brincker (2012). If the Motor System is No Mirror'. In Payette (ed.), Connected Minds: Cognition and Interaction in the Social World. Cambridge Scholars Publishing 158--182.
    Largely aided by the neurological discovery of so-called “ mirror neurons,” the attention to motor activity during action observation has exploded over the last two decades. The idea that we internally “ mirror ” the actions of others has led to a new strand of implicit simulation theories of action understanding[1][2]. The basic idea of this sort of simulation theory is that we, via an automatic covert activation of our own action representations, can understand the action and possibly the goal (...)
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  34. Maria Brincker (2010). Moving Beyond Mirroring - a Social Affordance Model of Sensorimotor Integration During Action Perception. Dissertation, City University of New York
    The discovery of so-called ‘mirror neurons’ - found to respond both to own actions and the observation of similar actions performed by others - has been enormously influential in the cognitive sciences and beyond. Given the self-other symmetry these neurons have been hypothesized as underlying a ‘mirror mechanism’ that lets us share representations and thereby ground core social cognitive functions from intention understanding to linguistic abilities and empathy. I argue that mirror neurons are important for very different reasons. Rather than (...)
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  35. Maria Brincker & Elizabeth B. Torres (2013). Noise From the Periphery in Autism. Frontiers in Integrative Neuroscience 7:34.
    No two individuals with the autism diagnosis are ever the same—yet many practitioners and parents can recognize signs of ASD very rapidly with the naked eye. What, then, is this phenotype of autism that shows itself across such distinct clinical presentations and heterogeneous developments? The “signs” seem notoriously slippery and resistant to the behavioral threshold categories that make up current assessment tools. Part of the problem is that cognitive and behavioral “abilities” typically are theorized as high-level disembodied and modular functions—that (...)
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  36. Robert Briscoe (2011). The Elusive Experience of Agency. Topics in Cognitive Science 3 (2):262-267.
    I here present some doubts about whether Mandik’s (2010) proposed intermediacy and recurrence constraints are necessary and sufficient for agentive experience. I also argue that in order to vindicate the conclusion that agentive experience is an exclusively perceptual phenomenon (Prinz, 2007), it is not enough to show that the predictions produced by forward models of planned motor actions are conveyed by mock sensory signals. Rather, it must also be shown that the outputs of “comparator” mechanisms that compare these predictions against (...)
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  37. Robert Briscoe (2010). Perceiving the Present: Systematization of Illusions or Illusion of Systematization? Cognitive Science 34 (8):1530-1542.
    Mark Changizi et al. (2008) claim that it is possible systematically to organize more than 50 kinds of illusions in a 7 × 4 matrix of 28 classes. This systematization, they further maintain, can be explained by the operation of a single visual processing latency correction mechanism that they call “perceiving the present” (PTP). This brief report raises some concerns about the way a number of illusions are classified by the proposed systematization. It also poses two general problems—one empirical and (...)
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  38. Robert Briscoe (2009). Egocentric Spatial Representation in Action and Perception. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 79 (2):423-460.
    Neuropsychological findings used to motivate the "two visual systems" hypothesis have been taken to endanger a pair of widely accepted claims about spatial representation in conscious visual experience. The first is the claim that visual experience represents 3-D space around the perceiver using an egocentric frame of reference. The second is the claim that there is a constitutive link between the spatial contents of visual experience and the perceiver's bodily actions. In this paper, I review and assess three main sources (...)
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  39. D. A. Brown (1999). One for the Neuroscientist. Bioessays 21 (4):361-361.
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  40. Elliot Clayton Brown, Jan Roelf Wiersema, Gilles Pourtois & Martin Brüne (2013). Modulation of Motor Cortex Activity When Observing Rewarding and Punishing Actions. Neuropsychologia 51 (1):52-58.
    Interpreting others' actions is essential for understanding the intentions and goals in social interactions. Activity in the motor cortex is evoked when we see another person performing actions, which can also be influenced by the intentions and context of the observed action. No study has directly explored the influence of reward and punishment on motor cortex activity when observing others' actions, which is likely to have substantial relevance in different social contexts. In this experiment, EEG was recorded while participants watched (...)
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  41. Nicolas J. Bullot & Rolf Reber (2013). The Artful Mind Meets Art History: Toward a Psycho-Historical Framework for the Science of Art Appreciation. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 36 (2):123-180.
    Research seeking a scientific foundation for the theory of art appreciation has raised controversies at the intersection of the social and cognitive sciences. Though equally relevant to a scientific inquiry into art appreciation, psychological and historical approaches to art developed independently and lack a common core of theoretical principles. Historicists argue that psychological and brain sciences ignore the fact that artworks are artifacts produced and appreciated in the context of unique historical situations and artistic intentions. After revealing flaws in the (...)
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  42. David Caplan (1981). Prospects for Neurolinguistic Theory. Cognition 10 (1-3):59-64.
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  43. Pico Caroni (1997). Intrinsic Neuronal Determinants That Promotes Axonal Sprouting and Elongation. Bioessays 19 (9):767-775.
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  44. Noël Carroll & William P. Seeley (2013). Kinesthetic Understanding and Appreciation in Dance. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 71 (2):177-186.
    The idea that choreographic movements communicate to audiences by kinetic transfer is a commonplace among choreographers, dancers, and dance educators.1 Moreover, most dance lovers can cite their own favorite examples—the bounciness of the Royal Danish Ballet, the stomping of Bharata Natyam performers, the stag leaps in the thundering Greek chorus in Martha Graham’s Night Journey, or the contagious rhythmic transfer that takes over our feet when we watch classic tap dancers like Buster Brown. The perceptual capacity for kinetic transfer was (...)
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  45. Paul Carron, A Case for Virtue: Aristotle’s Psychology and Contemporary Accounts of Emotion Regulation. Images of Europe. Past, Present, Future: ISSEI 2014 - Conference Proceedings.
    This essay argues that recent evidence in neurobiology and psychology supports Aristotle’s foundational psychology and account of self-control and demonstrates that his account of virtue is still relevant for understanding human agency. There is deep correlation between the psychological foundation of virtue that Aristotle describes in The Nicomachean Ethics (NE)—namely his distinction between the rational and nonrational parts of the soul, the way that they interact, and their respective roles in self-controlled action—and dual-process models of moral judgment. Furthermore, Aristotle’s conception (...)
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  46. Jean-Pierre Changeux & Stanislas Dehaene (1989). Neuronal Models of Cognitive Functions. Cognition 33 (1-2):63-109.
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  47. Matteo Colombo & Cory D. Wright (forthcoming). Explanatory Pluralism: An Unrewarding Prediction Error for Free Energy Theorists. Brain and Cognition.
    Courtesy of its free energy formulation, the hierarchical predictive processing theory of the brain (PTB) is often claimed to be a grand unifying theory. To test this claim, we examine a central case: activity of mesocorticolimbic dopaminergic (DA) systems. After reviewing the three most prominent hypotheses of DA activity—the anhedonia, incentive salience, and reward prediction error hypotheses—we conclude that the evidence currently vindicates explanatory pluralism. This vindication implies that the grand unifying claims of advocates of PTB are unwarranted. More generally, (...)
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  48. Elio Conte (2015). What Path Monitor: A Brief Note on Quantum Cognition and Quantum Interference, the Role of the Knowledge Factor Free Download at Http://Www.Scirp.Org/Journal/PaperInformation.Aspx?PaperID=54234#.VPtZ7HyG_10. Psychlogy 6:291-296.
    We discuss a celebrated experiment of quantum mechanics to evidence that quantum mechanics delineates a novel feature of our reality in which cognition enters as primary element, strongly linked ab initio to the dynamics of matter. Free download of the paper at http://www.scirp.org/Journal/PaperInformation.aspx?PaperID=54234#.VPtZ7HyG_10 -/- DOI: 10.4236/psych.2015.63029 -/- .
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  49. Elio Conte (2013). A Clifford Algebraic Analysis Gives Mathematical Explanation of Quantization of Quantum Theory and Delineates a Model of Quantum Reality in Which Information, Primitive Cognition Entities and a Principle of Existence Are Intrinsically Represented Ab Initio*. World Journal of Neuroscience Free Download Http.
    The thesis of this paper is that Information, Cognition and a Principle of Existence are intrinsically structured in the quantum model of reality. We reach such evidence by using the Clifford algebra. We analyze quantization in some traditional cases of quantum mechanics and, in particular in quantum harmonic oscillator, orbital angular momentum and hydrogen atom. The results are confirmed analyzing human cognition behavior that evidences a very consistent agreement with the basic quantum mechanical foundations.
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  50. Elio Conte (2012). Methods and Applications of Non-Linear Analysis in Neurology and Psycho-Physiology. Journal of Consciousness Exploration and Research 1 (9):1070-1138.
    In the light of the results obtained during the last two decades in analysis of signals by time series, it has become evident that the tools of non linear dynamics have their elective role of application in biological, and, in particular, in neuro-physiological and psycho-physiological studies. The basic concept in non linear analysis of experimental time series is that one of recurrence whose conceptual counterpart is represented from variedness and variability that are the foundations of complexity in dynamic processes. Thus, (...)
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