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  1. Morana Alač (2004). Negotiating Pictures of Numbers. Social Epistemology 18 (2-3):199-214.
    This paper reports on objectivity and knowledge production in the process of submitting, revising, and publishing an experimental research article in cognitive neuroscience. The review process, as part of scientific practice, is of particular interest, since it puts the research team in direct dialog with a larger scientific community concerned with fMRI evidence. By bringing this often ?black?boxed? dimension of the manuscript?s production into the picture, I illustrate the role that the visual brain representations played in the practice of scientific (...)
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  2. James S. Albus (2010). Reverse Engineering the Brain. International Journal of Machine Consciousness 2 (02):193-211.
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  3. Ammar Al‐Chalabi & Christopher C. J. Miller (2003). Neurofilaments and Neurological Disease. Bioessays 25 (4):346-355.
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  4. Agnès Aubert, Robert Costalat, Hugues Duffau & Habib Benali (2002). Modeling of Pathophysiological Coupling Between Brain Electrical Activation, Energy Metabolism and Hemodynamics: Insights for the Interpretation of Intracerebral Tumor Imaging. Acta Biotheoretica 50 (4):281-295.
    Gliomas can display marked changes in the concentrations of energy metabolism molecules such as creatine (Cr), phosphocreatine (PCr) and lactate, as measured using magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS). Moreover, the BOLD (blood oxygen level dependent) contrast enhancement in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) can be reduced or missing within or near gliomas, while neural activity is not significantly reduced (so-called neurovascular decoupling), so that the location of functionally eloquent areas using fMRI can be erroneous. In this paper, we adapt a previously (...)
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  5. Agnès Aubert, Robert Costalat & Romain Valabrègue (2001). Modelling of the Coupling Between Brain Electrical Activity and Metabolism. Acta Biotheoretica 49 (4):301-326.
    In order to make an attempt at grouping the various aspects of brain functional imaging (fMRI, MRS, EEG-MEG, ...) within a coherent frame, we implemented a model consisting of a system of differential equations, that includes: (1) sodium membrane transport, (2) Na/K ATPase, (3) neuronal energy metabolism (i.e. glycolysis, buffering effect of phosphocreatine, and mitochondrial respiration), (4) blood-brain barrier exchanges and (5) brain hemodynamics, all the processes which are involved in the activation of brain areas. We assumed that the correlation (...)
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  6. M. Aubert, M. Badoual & B. Grammaticos (2008). A Model for Short- and Long-Range Interactions of Migrating Tumour Cell. Acta Biotheoretica 56 (4):297-314.
    We examine the consequences of long-range effects on tumour cell migration. Our starting point are previous results of ours where we have shown that the migration patterns of glioma cells are best interpreted if one assumes attractive interactions between cells. Here we complement the cellular automaton model previously introduced by the assumption of the existence of a chemorepellent produced by the main bulk of large spheroids (in the hypoxic/necrotic areas). Visible effects due to the presence of such a substance can (...)
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  7. Gerd Bicker (2005). STOP and GO with NO: Nitric Oxide as a Regulator of Cell Motility in Simple Brains. Bioessays 27 (5):495-505.
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  8. R. J. R. Blair (2008). The Amygdala and Ventromedial Prefrontal Cortex: Functional Contributions and Dysfunction in Psychopathy. Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B 363:2557–2565.
    The current paper examines the functional contributions of the amygdala and ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC) and the evidence that the functioning of these systems is compromised in individuals with psychopathy. The amygdala is critical for the formation of stimulus–reinforcement associations, both punishment and reward based, and the processing of emotional expressions. vmPFC is critical for the representation of reinforcement expectancies and, owing to this, decision making. Neuropsychological and neuroimaging data from individuals with psychopathy are examined. It is concluded that these (...)
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  9. Inti A. Brazil, Rogier B. Mars, Berend H. Bulten, Jan K. Buitelaar, Robbert J. Verkes & Ellen R. A. De Bruijn (2011). A Neurophysiological Dissociation Between Monitoring One’s Own and Others’ Actions in Psychopathy. Biological Psychiatry 69:693–699.
    Monitoring of own behavior is not affected in psychopathy, whereas processing of the outcome of others’ actions is disturbed. Specifically, although psychopathic individuals do not have a problem with initial processing of the actions of others, they have problems with deeper analyses of the consequences of the observed action, possibility related to the reward value of the action. These results suggest that aspects of action monitoring in psychopathy are disturbed in social contexts and possibly play a central role in the (...)
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  10. Maria Brincker (2012). If the Motor System is No Mirror€. In Payette (ed.), Connected Minds: Cognition and Interaction in the Social World. Cambridge Scholars Publishing 158--182.
    Largely aided by the neurological discovery of so-called “mirror neurons,” the attention to motor activity during action observation has exploded over the last two decades. The idea that we internally “mirror” the actions of others has led to a new strand of implicit simulation theories of action understanding[1][2] (Gallese 2003, 2004, 2007; Gallese & Goldman 1998; Goldman 2009; Hurley 2008). The basic idea of this sort of simulation theory is that we, via an automatic covert activation of our own action (...)
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  11. Maria Brincker (2010). Moving Beyond Mirroring - a Social Affordance Model of Sensorimotor Integration During Action Perception. Dissertation, City University of New York
    The discovery of so-called ‘mirror neurons’ - found to respond both to own actions and the observation of similar actions performed by others - has been enormously influential in the cognitive sciences and beyond. Given the self-other symmetry these neurons have been hypothesized as underlying a ‘mirror mechanism’ that lets us share representations and thereby ground core social cognitive functions from intention understanding to linguistic abilities and empathy. I argue that mirror neurons are important for very different reasons. Rather than (...)
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  12. Robert Briscoe (2011). The Elusive Experience of Agency. Topics in Cognitive Science 3 (2):262-267.
    I here present some doubts about whether Mandik’s (2010) proposed intermediacy and recurrence constraints are necessary and sufficient for agentive experience. I also argue that in order to vindicate the conclusion that agentive experience is an exclusively perceptual phenomenon (Prinz, 2007), it is not enough to show that the predictions produced by forward models of planned motor actions are conveyed by mock sensory signals. Rather, it must also be shown that the outputs of “comparator” mechanisms that compare these predictions against (...)
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  13. Robert Briscoe (2010). Perceiving the Present: Systematization of Illusions or Illusion of Systematization? Cognitive Science 34 (8):1530-1542.
    Mark Changizi et al. (2008) claim that it is possible systematically to organize more than 50 kinds of illusions in a 7 × 4 matrix of 28 classes. This systematization, they further maintain, can be explained by the operation of a single visual processing latency correction mechanism that they call “perceiving the present” (PTP). This brief report raises some concerns about the way a number of illusions are classified by the proposed systematization. It also poses two general problems—one empirical and (...)
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  14. Robert Briscoe (2009). Egocentric Spatial Representation in Action and Perception. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 79 (2):423 - 460.
    Neuropsychological findings used to motivate the "two visual systems" hypothesis have been taken to endanger a pair of widely accepted claims about spatial representation in conscious visual experience. The first is the claim that visual experience represents 3-D space around the perceiver using an egocentric frame of reference. The second is the claim that there is a constitutive link between the spatial contents of visual experience and the perceiver's bodily actions. In this paper, I review and assess three main sources (...)
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  15. D. A. Brown (1999). One for the Neuroscientist. Bioessays 21 (4):361-361.
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  16. Elliot Clayton Brown, Jan Roelf Wiersema, Gilles Pourtois & Martin Brüne (2013). Modulation of Motor Cortex Activity When Observing Rewarding and Punishing Actions. Neuropsychologia 51 (1):52-58.
    Interpreting others' actions is essential for understanding the intentions and goals in social interactions. Activity in the motor cortex is evoked when we see another person performing actions, which can also be influenced by the intentions and context of the observed action. No study has directly explored the influence of reward and punishment on motor cortex activity when observing others' actions, which is likely to have substantial relevance in different social contexts. In this experiment, EEG was recorded while participants watched (...)
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  17. Nicolas J. Bullot & Rolf Reber (2013). The Artful Mind Meets Art History: Toward a Psycho-Historical Framework for the Science of Art Appreciation. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 36 (2):123-180.
    Research seeking a scientific foundation for the theory of art appreciation has raised controversies at the intersection of the social and cognitive sciences. Though equally relevant to a scientific inquiry into art appreciation, psychological and historical approaches to art developed independently and lack a common core of theoretical principles. Historicists argue that psychological and brain sciences ignore the fact that artworks are artifacts produced and appreciated in the context of unique historical situations and artistic intentions. After revealing flaws in the (...)
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  18. Pico Caroni (1997). Intrinsic Neuronal Determinants That Promotes Axonal Sprouting and Elongation. Bioessays 19 (9):767-775.
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  19. Paul Carron, A Case for Virtue: Aristotle’s Psychology and Contemporary Accounts of Emotion Regulation. Images of Europe. Past, Present, Future: ISSEI 2014 - Conference Proceedings.
    This essay argues that recent evidence in neurobiology and psychology supports Aristotle’s foundational psychology and account of self-control and demonstrates that his account of virtue is still relevant for understanding human agency. There is deep correlation between the psychological foundation of virtue that Aristotle describes in The Nicomachean Ethics (NE)—namely his distinction between the rational and nonrational parts of the soul, the way that they interact, and their respective roles in self-controlled action—and dual-process models of moral judgment. Furthermore, Aristotle’s conception (...)
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  20. Elio Conte (2015). What Path Monitor: A Brief Note on Quantum Cognition and Quantum Interference, the Role of the Knowledge Factor Free Download at Http://Www.Scirp.Org/Journal/PaperInformation.Aspx?PaperID=54234#.VPtZ7HyG_10. Psychlogy 6:291-296.
    We discuss a celebrated experiment of quantum mechanics to evidence that quantum mechanics delineates a novel feature of our reality in which cognition enters as primary element, strongly linked ab initio to the dynamics of matter. Free download of the paper at http://www.scirp.org/Journal/PaperInformation.aspx?PaperID=54234#.VPtZ7HyG_10 -/- DOI: 10.4236/psych.2015.63029 -/- .
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  21. Elio Conte (2013). A Clifford Algebraic Analysis Gives Mathematical Explanation of Quantization of Quantum Theory and Delineates a Model of Quantum Reality in Which Information, Primitive Cognition Entities and a Principle of Existence Are Intrinsically Represented Ab Initio*. World Journal of Neuroscience Free Download Http.
    The thesis of this paper is that Information, Cognition and a Principle of Existence are intrinsically structured in the quantum model of reality. We reach such evidence by using the Clifford algebra. We analyze quantization in some traditional cases of quantum mechanics and, in particular in quantum harmonic oscillator, orbital angular momentum and hydrogen atom. The results are confirmed analyzing human cognition behavior that evidences a very consistent agreement with the basic quantum mechanical foundations.
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  22. Elio Conte (2012). Methods and Applications of Non-Linear Analysis in Neurology and Psycho-Physiology. Journal of Consciousness Exploration and Research 1 (9):1070-1138.
    In the light of the results obtained during the last two decades in analysis of signals by time series, it has become evident that the tools of non linear dynamics have their elective role of application in biological, and, in particular, in neuro-physiological and psycho-physiological studies. The basic concept in non linear analysis of experimental time series is that one of recurrence whose conceptual counterpart is represented from variedness and variability that are the foundations of complexity in dynamic processes. Thus, (...)
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  23. Elio Conte (2011). An Investigation on the Basic Conceptual Foundations of Quantum Mechanics by Using the Clifford Algebra. Advanced Studies in Theoretical Physics 5 (11):485-544.
    We review our approach to quantum mechanics adding also some new interesting results. We start by giving proof of two important theorems on the existence of the A(Si) and i,±1 N Clifford algebras. This last algebra gives proof of the von Neumann basic postulates on the quantum measurement explaining thus in an algebraic manner the wave function collapse postulated in standard quantum theory. In this manner we reach the objective to expose a self-consistent version of quantum mechanics. In detail we (...)
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  24. Adam M. Croom (2014). Embodying Martial Arts for Mental Health: Cultivating Psychological Wellbeing with Martial Arts Practice. Archives of Budo Science of Martial Arts and Extreme Sports 10:59-70.
    The question of what constitutes and facilitates mental health or psychological well-being has remained of great interest to martial artists and philosophers alike, and still endures to this day. Although important questions about well-being remain, it has recently been argued in the literature that a paradigmatic or prototypical case of human psychological well-being would characteristically consist of positive emotion, engagement, relationships, meaning, and accomplishment. Other scholarship has also recently suggested that martial arts practice may positively promote psychological well-being, although recent (...)
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  25. Adam M. Croom (2012). Music, Neuroscience, and the Psychology of Wellbeing: A Précis. Frontiers in Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology 2 (393):393.
    In Flourish, the positive psychologist Martin Seligman (2011) identifies five commonly recognized factors that are characteristic of human flourishing or wellbeing: (1) “positive emotion,” (2) “relationships,” (3) “engagement,” (4) “achievement,” and (5) “meaning” (p. 24). Although there is no settled set of necessary and sufficient conditions neatly circumscribing the bounds of human flourishing (Seligman, 2011), we would mostly likely consider a person that possessed high levels of these five factors as paradigmatic or prototypical of human flourishing. Accordingly, if we wanted (...)
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  26. J. Demongeot, D. Benaouda, O. Nérot & C. Jézéquel (1994). Random Simulation and Confiners: Their Application to Neural Networks. Acta Biotheoretica 42 (2-3):203-213.
    Random simulation of complex dynamical systems is generally used in order to obtain information about their asymptotic behaviour (i.e., when time or size of the system tends towards infinity). A fortunate and welcome circumstance in most of the systems studied by physicists, biologists, and economists is the existence of an invariant measure in the state space allowing determination of the frequency with which observation of asymptotic states is possible. Regions found between contour lines of the surface density of this invariant (...)
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  27. Sue Deuchars & Jim Deuchars (1998). Neuroscience-a Novelty for the Nervous: Neuroscience (1997). Purves D, Augustine GJ, Fitzpatrick D, Katz LC, LaMantia A-S, McNamara JO (Eds). Sunderland, MA: Sinauer Associates, Inc. 562 Pp. [REVIEW] Bioessays 20 (10):871-872.
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  28. Ziya V. Dikman & John J. B. Allen (2000). Error Monitoring During Reward and Avoidance Learning in High- and Low-Socialized Individuals. Psychophysiology 37:43–54.
    The error-related negativity (ERN) is a response-locked brain potential generated when individuals make mistakes during simple decision-making tasks. In the present study, we examined ERN under conditions of reward and punishment, among participants who scored extremely low or high on the socialization scale of the California Psychological Inventory (CPI). Participants completed a forced-choice task, and were rewarded for correct responses in half the trials, and punished for incorrect responses in the remaining trials. A significant interaction between socialization (SO) and condition (...)
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  29. Mauro DiNuzzo, Bruno Maraviglia & Federico Giove (2011). Why Does the Brain (Not) Have Glycogen? Bioessays 33 (5):319-326.
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  30. J. L. Dubbeldam (1993). Brain Organization and Behaviour. Acta Biotheoretica 41 (4):469-479.
    Central question of this essay is, whether it is possible to relate specific aspects of the organization of sensorimotor systems to specific aspects of the behaviour. The role of the auditory system as part of a system for vocalization (song-birds) or as part of a system for prey localization (owls) and the different roles of the trigeminal system in the feeding behaviour of different birds are considered. The ascending sensory systems seem to possess a comparable organization in the various (...)
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  31. Mirko Farina (2013). Neither Touch nor Vision: Sensory Substitution as Artificial Synaesthesia? Biology and Philosophy 28 (4):639-655.
    Block (Trends Cogn Sci 7:285–286, 2003) and Prinz (PSYCHE 12:1–19, 2006) have defended the idea that SSD perception remains in the substituting modality (auditory or tactile). Hurley and Noë (Biol Philos 18:131–168, 2003) instead argued that after substantial training with the device, the perceptual experience that the SSD user enjoys undergoes a change, switching from tactile/auditory to visual. This debate has unfolded in something like a stalemate where, I will argue, it has become difficult to determine whether the perception acquired (...)
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  32. Joerg Fingerhut, Sabine Flach & Jan Söffner (2011). Synaesthesia and Kinaesthetics. Peter Lang.
    A myriad of sensations inform and direct us when we engage with the environment. To understand their influence on the development of our habitus it is important to focus on unifying processes in sensing. This approach allows us to include phenomena that elude a rather narrow view that focuses on each of the five discrete senses in isolation. One of the central questions addressed in this volume is whether there is something like a sensual habitus, and if there is, how (...)
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  33. K. M. Franks & T. J. Sejnowski (2002). Communication in Neuronal Networks. Bioessays 12:1130.
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  34. José Angel García Landa, Interacción Internalizada: El Desarrollo Especular Del Lenguaje y Del Orden Simbólico (Internalized Interaction: The Specular Development of Language and the Symbolic Order).
    This paper expounds a symbolic interactionist theory of consciousness as an emergent phenomenon. It relates Michael Arbib's theory of the origin of language and Erving Goffman's frame analysis, especially as it bears on our understanding of the subject and of personal experience. Reflexivity and fictional mimesis are shown to be inherent to the origin of language and to the continuing emergent creativity of human communicative action. The emergent aspect of consciousness is also dealt with from the perspective of a narrative (...)
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  35. Dimitria Electra Gatzia, Is the Auditory System Cognitively Penetrable? Multisensory Integration: Brain, Body, and the World.
    While much has been written about whether visual perception is cognitively penetrable, the analogous question with respect to auditory perception has received very little attention. Here we argue that instances of top-down modulation of auditory processing, although extensive, do not constitute cases of cognitive penetration of auditory perception since the changes in the phenomenology of auditory perception caused by top-down influences cannot plausibly be attributed to the listeners’ discursive thoughts (at least not in a semantically-coherent way).
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  36. Danko Georgiev, Interneuronal Macroscopic Quantum Coherence in the Brain Cortex! The Role of the Intrasynaptic Adhesive Proteins Beta-Neurexin and Neuroligin-.
    There are many blank areas in understanding the brain dynamics and especially how it gives rise to consciousness. Quantum mechanics is believed to be capable of explaining the enigma of conscious experience, however till now there is not good enough model considering both the data from clinical neurology and having some explanatory power! In this paper is presented a novel model in defence of macroscopic quantum events within and between neural cells. The beta-neurexin-neuroligin-1 link is claimed to be not just (...)
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  37. J. Germana (1980). Wittgenstein Zen: Application to the Scientific Distinction of Two Modes of Human Consciousness Based on Brain Hemispheric Differences. Behaviorism 8 (2):149-150.
    Discusses 2 modes of human consciousness that have been postulated by the modern scientific theory of brain hemispheric differences. Problems and solutions that exemplify the distinct functions assigned to the modes are outlined.
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  38. Philip Gerrans & Jeanette Kennett (2010). Neurosentimentalism and Moral Agency. Mind 119 (475):585-614.
    Metaethics has recently been confronted by evidence from cognitive neuroscience that tacit emotional processes play an essential causal role in moral judgement. Most neuroscientists, and some metaethicists, take this evidence to vindicate a version of metaethical sentimentalism. In this paper we argue that the ‘dual process’ model of cognition that frames the discussion within and without philosophy does not do justice to an important constraint on any theory of deliberation and judgement. Namely, decision-making is the exercise of a capacity for (...)
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  39. James Giordano (2013). Unpacking Neuroscience and Neurotechnology - Instructions Not Included: Neuroethics Required. Neuroethics 6 (2):411-414.
    Using a metaphorical reminiscence upon holiday toys - and the hopes, challenges and possibilities they presented - this essay addresses the ways that the heuristics, outcomes and products of neuroscience have effected change in the human condition, predicament, and being. A note of caution is offered to pragmatically assess what can be done with neurotechnology, what can't, and what should and shouldn't - based upon the capacities and limitations of both the science, and our collective ability to handle knowledge, power (...)
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  40. Matthew G. Gold (2012). A Frontier in the Understanding of Synaptic Plasticity: Solving the Structure of the Postsynaptic Density. Bioessays 34 (7):599-608.
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  41. Seth G. N. Grant (2003). Synapse Signalling Complexes and Networks: Machines Underlying Cognition. Bioessays 25 (12):1229-1235.
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  42. Stephen Grossberg (2006). The Art of Seeing and Painting. Technical Report.
    The human urge to represent the three-dimensional world using two-dimensional pictorial representations dates back at least to Paleolithic times. Artists from ancient to modern times have struggled to understand how a few contours or color patches on a flat surface can induce mental representations of a three-dimensional scene. This article summarizes some of the recent breakthroughs in scientifically understanding how the brain sees that shed light on these struggles. These breakthroughs illustrate how various artists have intuitively understand paradoxical properties about (...)
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  43. J. R. Hall, E. M. Bernat & C. J. Patrick (2007). Externalizing Psychopatholog Yand the Error-Related Negativity. Psychological Science 18 (4):326-333.
    Prior research has demonstrated that antisocial behavior, substance-use disorders, and personality dimensions of aggression and impulsivity are indicators of a highly heritable underlying dimension of risk, labeled externalizing. Other work has shown that individual trait constructs within this psychopathology spectrum are associated with reduced self-monitoring, as reflected by amplitude of the error-related negativity (ERN) brain response. In this study of undergraduate subjects, reduced ERN amplitude was associated with higher scores on a self-report measure of the broad externalizing construct that links (...)
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  44. Stuart Hameroff, Naughty Quantum Robot!
    Stuart Hameroff, M.D., is a doctor of medicine, a professor of anesthesiology and psychology, as well as associate director of the Center for Consciousness Studies at University of Arizona. Through a collaboration with mathematical physicist, Prof Sir Roger Penrose, Prof Hameroff is leading the assault on mainstream thinking about the human mind and how it is that we come to be. Forget space exploration. Forget biotechnology. Forget nanobots. Forget sea monkeys. The final frontier of science is reading this article right (...)
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  45. David F. Hardwick & Leslie Marsh (eds.) (2014). Propriety and Prosperity: New Studies on the Philosophy of Adam Smith. Palgrave.
    This book is a collection of specially commissioned chapters from philosophers, economists and political scientists, focusing on Adam Smith's two main works Theory of Moral Sentiments and Wealth of Nations. It examines the duality which manifests itself as an apparent contradiction: that is, how does one reconcile the view of human nature expounded in Theory of Moral Sentiments (sympathy and benevolence) and the view of human nature expounded in Wealth of Nations (self-interest)? New work by philosophers has uncovered the complex (...)
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  46. Kenneth J. Hayworth (2012). Electron Imaging Technology for Whole Brain Neural Circuit Mapping. International Journal of Machine Consciousness 4 (01):87-108.
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  47. Ulf Hlobil, Chaturbhuj Rathore, Aley Alexander, Sankara Sarma & Kurupath Radhakrishnan (2008). Impaired Facial Emotion Recognition in Patients with Mesial Temporal Lobe Epilepsy Associated with Hippocampal Sclerosis (MTLE-HS): Side and Age at Onset Matters. Epilepsy Research 80 (2-3):150–157.
    To define the determinants of impaired facial emotion recognition (FER) in patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy associated with hippocampal sclerosis (MTLE-HS), we examined 76 patients with unilateral MTLE-HS, 36 prior to antero-mesial temporal lobectomy (AMTL) and 40 after AMTL, and 28 healthy control subjects with a FER test consisting of 60 items (20 each for anger, fear, and happiness). Mean percentages of the accurate responses were calculated for different subgroups: right vs. left MTLE-HS, early (age at onset <6 years) (...)
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  48. Jakob Hohwy (forthcoming). Prediction Error Minimization, Mental and Developmental Disorder, and Statistical Theories of Consciousness. In Rocco Gennaro (ed.), Disturbed Consciousness: New Essays on Psychopathology and Theories of Consciousness. MIT Press
    This chapter seeks to recover an approach to consciousness from a general theory of brain function, namely the prediction error minimization theory. The way this theory applies to mental and developmental disorder demonstrates its relevance to consciousness. The resulting view is discussed in relation to a contemporary theory of consciousness, namely the idea that conscious perception depends on Bayesian metacognition; this theory is also supported by considerations of psychopathology. This Bayesian theory is first disconnected from the higher-order thought theory, and (...)
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  49. Kevin S. Holloway (2012). Opioid Mediation of Learned Sexual Behavior. Socioaffective Neuroscience and Psychology 2.
    Identifying the role of opioids in the mediation of learned sexual behaviors has been complicated by the use of differing methodologies in the investigations. In this review addressing multiple species, techniques, and pharmaceutical manipulations, several features of opioid mediation become apparent. Opioids are differentially involved in conditioned and unconditioned sexual behaviors. The timing of the delivery of a sexual reinforcer during conditioning trials, especially those using male subjects, acutely influences the role that opioids have in learning. Opioids may be particularly (...)
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  50. Jim Hopkins (2012). Psychoanalysis Representation and Neuroscience: The Freudian Unconscious and the Bayesian Brain. In A. Fotopoulu, D. Pfaff & M. Conway (eds.), From the Couch to the Lab: Psychoanalysis, Neuroscience and Cognitive Psychology in Dialoge. OUP
    This paper argues that recent work in the 'free energy' program in neuroscience enables us better to understand both consciousness and the Freudian unconscious, including the role of the superego and the id. This work also accords with research in developmental psychology (particularly attachment theory) and with evolutionary considerations bearing on emotional conflict. This argument is carried forward in various ways in the work that follows, including 'Understanding and Healing', 'The Significance of Consilience', 'Psychoanalysis, Philosophical Issues', and 'Kantian Neuroscience and (...)
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