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  1. Michael A. Arbib (2011). Review Essay: Niche Construction and the Evolution of Language: Was Territory Scavenging the One Key Factor? Review Essay for Derek Bickerton (2009), Adams Tongue. How Humans Made Language, How Language Made Humans. New York: Hill Wang. Interaction Studies 12 (1):162-193.
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  2. Gillian Barker, Eric Desjardins & Trevor Pearce (eds.) (2013). Entangled Life: Organism and Environment in the Biological and Social Sciences. Springer.
  3. Gillian Barker & John Odling-Smee (2013). Integrating Ecology and Evolution: Niche Construction and Ecological Engineering. In Gillian Barker, Eric Desjardins & Trevor Pearce (eds.), Entangled Life: Organism and Environment in the Biological and Social Sciences. Springer. 187-211.
  4. Robert Boyd, The Cultural Niche.
    In the last 60,000 years humans have expanded across the globe and now occupy a wider range than any other terrestrial species. Our ability to successfully adapt to such a diverse range of habitats is often explained in terms of our cognitive ability. Humans have relatively bigger brains and more computing power than other animals and this allows us to figure out how to live in a wide range of environments. Here we argue that humans may be smarter than other (...)
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  5. Gwen J. Broude (2000). Can Niche-Construction Theory Live in Harmony with Human Equipotentiality? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (1):149-150.
    Consistent with the “niche construction” hypothesis, human beings tailor their behavior to local circumstances in ways beneficial to their inclusive fitness. However, the fact that any human being seems equally capable of adopting any of these context-dependent fitness-enhancing behaviors makes niche construction theory implausible in practice. The human capacity for exhibiting context-specific behavior remains in need of an explanation.
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  6. Joseph Bulbulia (2012). Spreading Order: Religion, Cooperative Niche Construction, and Risky Coordination Problems. Biology and Philosophy 27 (1):1-27.
    Adaptationists explain the evolution of religion from the cooperative effects of religious commitments, but which cooperation problem does religion evolve to solve? I focus on a class of symmetrical coordination problems for which there are two pure Nash equilibriums: (1) ALL COOPERATE, which is efficient but relies on full cooperation; (2) ALL DEFECT, which is inefficient but pays regardless of what others choose. Formal and experimental studies reveal that for such risky coordination problems, only the defection equilibrium is evolutionarily stable. (...)
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  7. Chris Buskes (2013). Darwinism Extended: A Survey of How the Idea of Cultural Evolution Evolved. Philosophia 41 (3):661-691.
    In the past 150 years there have been many attempts to draw parallels between cultural and biological evolution. Most of these attempts were flawed due to lack of knowledge and false ideas about evolution. In recent decades these shortcomings have been cleared away, thus triggering a renewed interest in the subject. This paper offers a critical survey of the main issues and arguments in that discussion. The paper starts with an explication of the Darwinian algorithm of evolution. It is argued (...)
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  8. Werner Callebaut (2007). Transcendental Niche Construction. Acta Biotheoretica 55 (1).
    I discuss various reactions to my article “Again, what the philosophy of science is not” [Callebaut (Acta Biotheor 53:92–122 (2005a))], most of which concern the naturalism issue, the place of the philosophy of biology within philosophy of science and philosophy at large, and the proper tasks of the philosophy of biology.
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  9. Andy Clark (2005). Word, Niche and Super-Niche: How Language Makes Minds Matter More. Theoria 20 (54):255-268.
    How does language (spoken or written) impact thought? One useful way to approach this important but elusive question may be to consider language itself as a cognition-enhancing animal-built structure. To take this perspective is to view language as a kind of self-constructed cognitive niche. These self-constructed cognitive niches play, I suggest, three distinct but deeply interlocking roles in human thought and reason. Working together, these three interlocking routines radically transform the human mind, and mark a genuine discontinuity in the space (...)
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  10. Mark Collard, Briggs Buchanan, April Ruttle & Michael J. O'Brien (2011). Niche Construction and the Toolkits of Hunter–Gatherers and Food Producers. Biological Theory 6 (3):251-259.
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  11. Stephen J. Cowley (2004). Early Hominins, Utterance-Activity, and Niche Construction. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (4):509-510.
    Falk's argument takes for granted that “protolanguage” used a genetic propensity for producing word-forms. Using developmental evidence, I dispute this assumption and, instead, reframe the argument in terms of behavioral ecology. Viewed as niche-construction, putting the baby down can help clarify not only the origins of talk but also the capacity to modify what we are saying as we speak.
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  12. Rachel L. Day, Kevin N. Laland & F. John Odling-Smee (2003). Rethinking Adaptation: The Niche-Construction Perspective. Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 46 (1):80-95.
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  13. Laurel Fogarty & Marcus W. Feldman (2011). The Cultural and Demographic Evolution of Son Preference and Marriage Type in Contemporary China. Biological Theory 6 (3):272-282.
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  14. Dorothy M. Fragaszy (2011). Community Resources for Learning: How Capuchin Monkeys Construct Technical Traditions. Biological Theory 6 (3):231-240.
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  15. Mary Gauvain (2000). Niche Construction, Social Co-Construction, and the Development of the Human Mind. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (1):153-153.
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  16. Peter Godfrey-Smith (2000). Niche Construction in Biological and Philosophical Theories. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (1):153-154.
    I distinguish different versions of the “niche construction” idea. Some are primarily scientific, while others are more philosophical. Laland, Odling-Smee & Feldman's is mostly scientific, but given that fact, there are some changes they could make to their account. I also compare the target article to Lewontin's classic 1983 paper.
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  17. Paul Griffiths (2003). Beyond the Baldwin Effect: James Mark Baldwin's 'Social Heredity', Epigenetic Inheritance, and Niche Construction. In Bruce H. Weber & David J. Depew (eds.), Evolution and Learning: The Baldwin Effect Reconsidered. Mit Press. 193--215.
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  18. Paul E. Griffiths (2005). Review of 'Niche Construction'. [REVIEW] Biology and Philosophy 20 (1):11-20.
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  19. James W. Haefner (1980). Two Metaphors of the Niche. Synthese 43 (1):123 - 153.
    In summary, many extant definitions of the niche concept are based on the geometric metaphor which represents the niche as an object embedded in a geometric space. There are several difficulties with this approach; the activities of organisms are not fully described, certain attributes of the functional aspect of the niche are not represented, the life cycles of organisms are not described, and the heuristic value of the concept diminishes with increasing dimensionality.An alternative and complementary approach to the niche is (...)
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  20. Benjamin E. Hardisty & Deby L. Cassill (2010). Memes and the Ecological Niche. Biological Theory 5 (2):109-111.
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  21. Tom Hench & Davide Secchi (2009). Organisational Niche-Construction and Stakeholder Analysis. Philosophy of Management 8 (3):47-64.
    A countless variety of stakeholder approaches are referenced by management scholars and practitioners, with theories on stakeholders divided into normative and descriptive categories and managerial and instrumental theories. This paper addresses the normative stakeholder approach and evaluates its strengths and weaknesses in the context of a new framework. We argue that stakeholder theory arose from a philosophical and scientific tradition where the object of scientific analysis was divided into constituent parts that made them easier to understand and to analyse. Although (...)
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  22. David L. Hull (2004). Niche Construction: The Neglected Process in Evolution (Review). Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 47 (2):314-316.
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  23. James R. Hurford (2008). Niche-Construction, Co-Evolution, and Domain-Specificity. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 31 (5):526-526.
    That language is shaped to fit the human brain is close to the Chomskyan position. The target article by Christiansen & Chater (C&C) assumes an entity, outside individual heads. What is the nature of this entity? Linguistic niche-construction and co-evolution of language and genes are possible, with some of what evolved being language-specific. Recent generative theory postulates much less than the old Universal Grammar (UG).
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  24. Atsushi Iriki (2010). Neural Reuse: A Polysemous and Redundant Biological System Subserving Niche-Construction. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 33 (4):276-277.
    Novel functions, which emerge by reusing existing resources formerly adapted to other original usages, cannot be anticipated before the need eventually arises. Simple reuse must be accidental. However, to survive the evolutionary race, one cannot merely keep hoping for a string of good fortune. So, successful species might be gifted with and biological mechanisms to prepare for future reuse. Neural reuse must be extrapolated from such mechanisms.
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  25. Ben Jeffares (2012). Thinking Tools: Acquired Skills, Cultural Niche Construction, and Thinking with Things. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 35 (4):228-229.
    The investigative strategy that Vaesen uses presumes that cognitive skills are to some extent hardwired; developmentally plastic traits would not provide the relevant comparative information. But recent views of cognition that stress external resources, and evolutionary accounts such as cultural niche construction, urge us to think carefully about the role of technology in shaping cognition.
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  26. Jeremy R. Kendal (2011). Cultural Niche Construction and Human Learning Environments: Investigating Sociocultural Perspectives. Biological Theory 6 (3):241-250.
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  27. Benjamin Kerr (2007). Niche Construction and Cognitive Evolution. Biological Theory 2 (3):250-262.
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  28. Kevin N. Laland & Michael J. O'Brien (2011). Cultural Niche Construction: An Introduction. Biological Theory 6 (3):191-202.
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  29. Kevin N. Laland, John Odling-Smee & Marcus W. Feldman (2005). On the Breadth and Significance of Niche Construction: A Reply to Griffiths, Okasha and Sterelny. [REVIEW] Biology and Philosophy 20 (1):37-55.
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  30. Kevin N. Laland, John Odling-Smee & Marcus W. Feldman (2000). Niche Construction, Biological Evolution, and Cultural Change. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (1):131-146.
    We propose a conceptual model that maps the causal pathways relating biological evolution to cultural change. It builds on conventional evolutionary theory by placing emphasis on the capacity of organisms to modify sources of natural selection in their environment (niche construction) and by broadening the evolutionary dynamic to incorporate ontogenetic and cultural processes. In this model, phenotypes have a much more active role in evolution than generally conceived. This sheds light on hominid evolution, on the evolution of culture, and on (...)
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  31. Kevin N. Laland, John Odling-Smee & Marcus W. Feldman (2000). Niche Construction Earns its Keep. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (1):164-172.
    Our response contains a definition of niche construction, illustrations of how it changes the evolutionary process, and clarifications of our conceptual model. We argue that the introduction of niche construction into evolutionary thinking earns its keep; we illustrate this argument in our discussion of rates of genetic and cultural evolution, memes and phenogenotypes, creativity, the EEA (environment of evolutionary adaptedness), and group selection.
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  32. Kevin N. Laland, John Odling-Smee, Marcus W. Feldman & Jeremy Kendal (2009). Conceptual Barriers to Progress Within Evolutionary Biology. Foundations of Science 14 (3):195-216.
    In spite of its success, Neo-Darwinism is faced with major conceptual barriers to further progress, deriving directly from its metaphysical foundations. Most importantly, neo-Darwinism fails to recognize a fundamental cause of evolutionary change, “niche construction”. This failure restricts the generality of evolutionary theory, and introduces inaccuracies. It also hinders the integration of evolutionary biology with neighbouring disciplines, including ecosystem ecology, developmental biology, and the human sciences. Ecology is forced to become a divided discipline, developmental biology is stubbornly difficult to reconcile (...)
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  33. Kevin N. Laland, John Odling-Smee, William Hoppitt & Tobias Uller (2013). More on How and Why: Cause and Effect in Biology Revisited. Biology and Philosophy 28 (5):719-745.
    In 1961, Ernst Mayr published a highly influential article on the nature of causation in biology, in which he distinguished between proximate and ultimate causes. Mayr argued that proximate causes (e.g. physiological factors) and ultimate causes (e.g. natural selection) addressed distinct ‘how’ and ‘why’ questions and were not competing alternatives. That distinction retains explanatory value today. However, the adoption of Mayr’s heuristic led to the widespread belief that ontogenetic processes are irrelevant to evolutionary questions, a belief that has (1) hindered (...)
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  34. Ehud Lamm, Inheritance Systems. The Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy (Spring 2012 Edition).
    Organisms inherit various kinds of developmental information and cues from their parents. The study of inheritance systems is aimed at identifying and classifying the various mechanisms and processes of heredity, the types of hereditary information that is passed on by each, the functional interaction between the different systems, and the evolutionary consequences of these properties. We present the discussion of inheritance systems in the context of several debates. First, between proponents of monism about heredity (gene-centric views), holism about heredity (Developmental (...)
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  35. Gabriel Levy (2010). Technology and Past Minds : The Case of Jewish Niche Construction. In Luther H. Martin & Jesper Sørensen (eds.), Past Minds: Studies in Cognitive Historiography. Equinox Pub. Ltd..
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  36. Alex Mesoudi, Simon Blanchet, Anne Charmantier, Étienne Danchin, Laurel Fogarty, Eva Jablonka, Kevin N. Laland, Thomas J. H. Morgan, Gerd B. Müller, F. John Odling-Smee & Benoît Pujol (2013). Is Non-Genetic Inheritance Just a Proximate Mechanism? A Corroboration of the Extended Evolutionary Synthesis. Biological Theory 7 (3):189-195.
    What role does non-genetic inheritance play in evolution? In recent work we have independently and collectively argued that the existence and scope of non-genetic inheritance systems, including epigenetic inheritance, niche construction/ecological inheritance, and cultural inheritance—alongside certain other theory revisions—necessitates an extension to the neo-Darwinian Modern Synthesis (MS) in the form of an Extended Evolutionary Synthesis (EES). However, this argument has been challenged on the grounds that non-genetic inheritance systems are exclusively proximate mechanisms that serve the ultimate function of calibrating organisms (...)
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  37. John Odling-Smee & Kevin N. Laland (2011). Ecological Inheritance and Cultural Inheritance: What Are They and How Do They Differ? Biological Theory 6 (3):220-230.
  38. John Odling-Smee & J. Scott Turner (2011). Niche Construction Theory and Human Architecture. Biological Theory 6 (3):283-289.
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  39. Samir Okasha (2005). On Niche Construction and Extended Evolutionary Theory. Biology and Philosophy 20 (1):1-10.
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  40. B. C. Patten & G. T. Auble (1980). Systems Approach to the Concept of Niche. Synthese 43 (1):155 - 181.
    The systems approach to niche presented herein stands as an example of the unifying potential of mathematical system theory when applied to concepts and principles of ecology. Beginning with subjective concepts from the naturalistic tradition, the niche was framed in the formalism of general system theory. So modeled, it appeared as a restriction of a more general construct, the environ. Both niches and environs are implementable in the context of ecosystem models, and with the growing ability of ecologists to construct (...)
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  41. Trevor Pearce (2011). Ecosystem Engineering, Experiment, and Evolution. Biology and Philosophy 26 (6):793-812.
    This paper argues that philosophers should pay more attention to the idea of ecosystem engineering and to the scientific literature surrounding it. Ecosystem engineering is a broad but clearly delimited concept that is less subject to many of the “it encompasses too much” criticisms that philosophers have directed at niche construction . The limitations placed on the idea of ecosystem engineering point the way to a narrower idea of niche construction. Moreover, experimental studies in the ecosystem engineering literature provide detailed (...)
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  42. Jaroslav Peregrin, Creatures of Norms as Uncanny Niche Constructors.
    Imagine a Paleolithic hunter, who has failed to hunt down anything for a couple of days and is hungry. He has an urgent desire, the desire to eat, which he is not able to fulfill – his desire is frustrated by the world. Now imagine our contemporary bank clerk, who went to work forgetting his wallet at home and is hungry too. He too is not able to fulfill his urgent desire to eat because it is frustrated by the world. (...)
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  43. Kenneth Reisman (2007). Is Culture Inherited Through Social Learning? Biological Theory 2 (3):300-306.
    In this article I challenge the widely held assumption that human culture is inherited by means of social learning. First, I address the distinction between “social” learning and “individual” learning. I argue that most cultural ideas are not acquired by one form of learning or the other, but from a hybrid of both. Second, I discuss how individual learning can interact with niche construction. I argue that these processes collectively provide a non-social route for learned ideas to be inherited and (...)
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  44. P. A. Russell & D. P. Carey (2000). Niche Construction at the “Workface” of the Human Behavioural Sciences. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (1):158-158.
    Niche construction is a potentially important concept for the human behavioural sciences but we question how it differs from models of gene-culture coevolution and whether it can be developed in the detailed ways that will be necessary if it is going to make a significant contribution to the human behavioural sciences.
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  45. Eric Saidel (2000). The Compound Interest Effect: Why Cultural Evolution is Not Niche Construction. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (1):158-159.
    Laland et al. rightly observe that the pressures affecting the evolution of a trait include the previous effects the trait has had on the environment. Ignoring this would be like ignoring the effect of compound interest: a distortion, not a simplification. However, cultural evolution is not niche construction. In niche construction one mechanism has effects over multiple paths. Cultural evolution involves the effects of several mechanisms.
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  46. Armin W. Schulz (2014). Niche Construction, Adaptive Preferences, and the Differences Between Fitness and Utility. Biology and Philosophy 29 (3):315-335.
    A number of scholars have recently defended the claim that there is a close connection between the evolutionary biological notion of fitness and the economic notion of utility: both are said to refer to an organism’s success in dealing with its environment, and both are said to play the same theoretical roles in their respective sciences. However, an analysis of two seemingly disparate but in fact structurally related phenomena—‘niche construction’ (the case where organisms change their environment to make it fit (...)
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  47. Dean Keith Simonton (2000). Human Creativity, Cultural Evolution, and Niche Construction. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (1):159-160.
    Cultural evolution may be even more prolific in the generation of new forms than is biological evolution – especially when it takes the form of creative genius. Yet evolutionary theories have tended to overlook the factors that might select for outstanding individual creativity. A recent dual-inheritance theory is outlined and then integrated with the niche-construction theory of Laland et al.
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  48. Chris Sinha (forthcoming). Niche Construction, Too, Unifies Praxis and Symbolization. Language and Cognition.
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  49. Barry Smith & Achille C. Varzi (1999). The Niche. Noûs 33 (2):214-238.
    The concept of niche (setting, context, habitat, environment) has been little studied by ontologists, in spite of its wide application in a variety of disciplines from evolutionary biology to economics. What follows is a first formal theory of this concept, a theory of the relations between objects and their niches. The theory builds upon existing work on mereology, topology, and the theory of spatial location as tools of formal ontology. It will be illustrated above all by means of simple biological (...)
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  50. Bruce D. Smith (2011). A Cultural Niche Construction Theory of Initial Domestication. Biological Theory 6 (3):260-271.
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