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  1. Fred Ablondi (1999). Malebranche and Knowledge of the Soul. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 73 (4):571-581.
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  2. Alan Baker (2005). Malebranche's Occasionalism. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 79 (2):251-272.
    The core thesis of Malebranche’s doctrine of occasionalism is that God is the sole true cause, where a true cause is one that has the power to initiate change and for which the mind perceives a necessary connection between it and its effects. Malebranche gives two separate arguments for his core thesis, T, based on necessary connection and on divine power respectively. The standard view is that these two arguments are necessary to establish T. I argue for a reinterpretation of (...)
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  3. Martin Bell (1997). Hume and Causal Power: The Influences of Malebranche and Newton. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 5 (1):67 – 86.
  4. Gustav Bergmann (1956). Some Remarks on the Philosophy of Malebranche. Review of Metaphysics 10 (2):207 - 226.
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  5. Alexander U. Bertland (2004). La Filosofia Dell'immaginazione in Vico E Malebranche. New Vico Studies 22:128-134.
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  6. Harry M. Bracken (1985). Malebranche and British Philosophy. Journal of the History of Philosophy 23 (3):431-433.
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  7. V. C. Chappell (ed.) (1992). Nicolas Malebranche. Garland.
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  8. Ralph Withington Church (1931/1970). A Study in the Philosophy of Malebranche. Port Washington, N.Y.,Kennikat Press.
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  9. Desmond M. Clarke (1995). Malebranche and Occasionalism: A Reply to Steven Nadler. Journal of the History of Philosophy 33 (3):499-504.
    In Malebranche's account of occasional causality, God exercises his general will with respect to every event that merits a causal explanation. Nadler distinguishes two pictures of God's involvement; (1) there are as many distinct acts of God's will as there are causal events to be explained; (2) God's will is exercised once only, when the natural order of causes is created. I argue that Malebranche's concept of God is inconsistent with a real distinction between God and acts of his will, (...)
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  10. Desmond M. Clarke (1989). Occult Powers and Hypotheses: Cartesian Natural Philosophy Under Louis Xiv. Oxford University Press.
    This book analyses the concept of scientific explanation developed by French disciples of Descartes in the period 1660-1700. Clarke examines the views of authors such as Malebranche and Rohault, as well as those of less well-known authors such as Cordemoy, Gadroys, Poisson and R'egis. These Cartesian natural philosophers developed an understanding of scientific explanation as necessarily hypothetical, and, while they contributed little to new scientific discoveries, they made a lasting contribution to our concept of explanation--generations of scientists in subsequent centuries (...)
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  11. Desmond Connell (1967). The Vision in God; Malebranche's Scholastic Sources. New York, Humanities Press.
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  12. J. Thomas Cook (2011). Göttliche Gedanken. Zur Metaphysik der Erkenntnis bei Descartes, Malebranche, Spinoza und Leibniz. Journal of the History of Philosophy 49 (4):495-496.
    In Göttliche Gedanken (Godly Thoughts), Andreas Schmidt provides an in-depth discussion of the metaphysics of knowledge and of mind in four early-modern rationalists: Descartes, Malebranche, Spinoza, and Leibniz. His topic overlaps with what is called “philosophy of mind” in contemporary Anglo-American circles, for he is quite interested in the relation between mind and body in these four historical thinkers. But as Schmidt effectively reminds us, the “mind-body problem” looks entirely different when embedded in the conceptual setting of the seventeenth century. (...)
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  13. Monte Cook (2007). Malebranche's Criticism of Descartes's Proof That There Are Bodies. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 15 (4):641 – 657.
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  14. Monte Cook (1998). The Ontological Status of Malebranchean Ideas. Journal of the History of Philosophy 36 (4):525-544.
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  15. Monte Cook (1991). Malebranche Versus Arnauld. Journal of the History of Philosophy 29 (2):183-199.
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  16. David Cunning (2008). Malebranche and Occasional Causes. Philosophy Compass 3 (3):471–490.
    In VI.ii.3 of The Search After Truth Malebranche offers an argument for the view that only God is a cause. Here I defend an interpretation of the argument according to which Malebranche is supposing (quite rightly) that if there is a necessary connection between a cause and its effect, then if creatures were real causes, God's volitions would not be sufficient to bring about their intended effects. I then consider the argument from constant creation that Malebranche offers in Dialogues on (...)
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  17. David Cunning (2003). Systematic Divergences in Malebranche and Cudworth. Journal of the History of Philosophy 41 (3):343-363.
    : For Cudworth, God would be a drudge if He did each and every thing, and so the universe contains plastic natures. Malebranche argues that finite power is unintelligible and thus that God does do each and every thing. The supremacy of God is reflected in the range of His activity and also in the manner of His activity: He acts by general non-composite volitions. Malebranche (like Cudworth) is careful to adjust other aspects of his system to square with his (...)
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  18. Edwin Curley (1974). Recent Work on 17th Century Continental Philosophy. American Philosophical Quarterly 11 (4):235 - 255.
    This article surveys work on descartes, Spinoza, Malebranche, And leibniz, Between 1960 and 1972, With particular attention to hintikka, Frankfurt, Kenny, Gueroult, Robinet, Rescher, Parkinson, Ishiguro, And mates. It is accompanied by an extensive bibliography.
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  19. Sr Mary Bernard Curran (2009). Malebranche on Disinterestedness. Philosophy and Theology 21 (1/2):27-41.
    Nicolas Malebranche in the Treatise on the Love of God argues against the Quietists, who thought that the pure love of God required the extinction of self-interest, understood to include a stance of disinterestedness with regard to happiness, even to eternal happiness. Ipresent Malebranche’s essay as structured by contrasts the resolution of which Malebranche maintains leads to union with God, whichis love and happiness. By referring to several thinkers, past and present, I suggest alternative ways of thinking about God, love (...)
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  20. Arthur Ernest Davies (1924). Some Factors of Malebranche's Theory of Knowledge. Philosophical Review 33 (5):479-497.
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  21. Raymond Dennehy (2009). The Malebranche Moment: Selections From the Letters of Étienne Gilson & Henri Gouhier (1920-1936). Tr. & Edited by Richard J. Fafara. [REVIEW] Heythrop Journal 50 (2):326-327.
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  22. Karen Detlefsen (2003). Supernaturalism, Occasionalism, and Preformation in Malebranche. Perspectives on Science 11 (4):443-483.
  23. G. N. Dolson (1906). The Idealism of Malebranche. Philosophical Review 15 (4):387-405.
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  24. Lisa Downing, Occasionalism and Strict Mechanism: Malebranche, Berkeley, Fontenelle.
    The rich connections between metaphysics and natural philosophy in the early modern period have been widely acknowledged and productively mined, thanks in no small part to the work of Margaret Wilson, whose book, Descartes, served as an inspirational example for a generation of scholars. The task of this paper is to investigate one particular such connection, namely, the relation between occasionalist metaphysics and strict mechanism. My focus will be on the work of Nicholas Malebranche, the most influential Cartesian philosopher after (...)
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  25. Carll Whitman Doxsee (1916). Hume's Relation to Malebranche. Philosophical Review 25 (5):692-710.
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  26. S. F. (2003). Andrew Pyle Malebranche. (London: Routledge, 2003). (Arguments of the Philosophers). Pp. XII+289. £55.00 (Hbk). ISBN 0 415 28911. [REVIEW] Religious Studies 39 (4):503-503.
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  27. A. R. J. Fisher (2011). Causal and Logical Necessity in Malebranche's Occasionalism. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 41 (4):523-548.
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  28. Desmond J. FitzGerald (2009). The Malebranche Moment. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 83 (2):302-303.
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  29. Léo Freuler (1998). Métaphysique et morale de Descartes à Kant. Revue de Métaphysique et de Morale 2:219-236.
  30. Philippe Gagnon (2003). Malebranche Et Berkeley: Les Créatures Et les Raisons Éternelles. Bulletin de la Société de Philosophie du Québec 29 (2):15-16.
  31. Daniel Garber (1982). Book Review:The Search After Truth Nicholas Malebranche, Thomas M. Lennon, Paul J. Olscamp; Elucidations of the Search After Truth Thomas M. Lennon; Philosophical Commentary Thomas M. Lennon. [REVIEW] Philosophy of Science 49 (1):146-.
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  32. Sean Greenberg (2010). Malebranche on the Passions: Biology, Morality and the Fall. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 18 (2):191 – 207.
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  33. Sean Greenberg (2008). 'Things That Undermine Each Other': Occasionalism, Freedom, and Attention in Malebranche. In Daniel Garber & Steven Nadler (eds.), Oxford Studies in Early Modern Philosophy, Vol. 4. Oxford University Press.
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  34. Katharine J. Hamerton (2008). Malebranche, Taste, and Sensibility: The Origins of Sensitive Taste and a Reconsideration of Cartesianism's Feminist Potential. Journal of the History of Ideas 69 (4):533-558.
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  35. Thomas Heyd (2000). The Search After Truth: With Elucidations of the Search After Truth Nicolas Malebranche Thomas M. Lennon and Paul J. Olscamp, Translators and Editors New York: Cambridge University Press, 1997, Xlvi + 775 Pp., $79.95, $29.95 Paper. [REVIEW] Dialogue 39 (02):410-.
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  36. T. J. Hochstrasser & Peter Schröder (eds.) (2003). Early Modern Natural Law Theories: Contexts and Strategies in Early Enlightenment. Kluwer Academic Publishers.
    The study of natural law theories is presently one of the most fruitful areas of research in the studies of early modern intellectual history, and moral and political theory. Likewise the historical significance of the Enlightenment for the development of `modernisation' in many different forms continues to be the subject of controversy. This collection therefore offers a timely opportunity to re-examine both the coherence of the concept of an `early Enlightenment', and the specific contribution of natural law theories to its (...)
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  37. F. P. Hoskyn (1930). The Relation of Malebranche and Leibniz on Questions in Cartesian Physics. The Monist 40 (1):131-145.
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  38. G. A. Johnston (1935). Berkeley and Malebranche. A Study in the Origins of Berkeley's Thought. By A. A. Luce D.D. (London: Oxford University Press; Humphrey Milford. 1934. Pp. Xii + 214. Price 10s.). [REVIEW] Philosophy 10 (40):490-.
  39. N. Jolley (1995). Sensation, Intentionality, and Animal Consciousness. Ratio 8 (2):128-42.
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  40. Nicholas Jolley (2003). Hume, Malebranche, and the Last Occult Quality. Philosophical Topics 31 (1/2):199-213.
  41. Nicholas Jolley (2002). Occasionalism and Efficacious Laws in Malebranche. Midwest Studies in Philosophy 26 (1):245–257.
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  42. Nicholas Jolley (1996). Berkeley, Malebranche, and Vision in God. Journal of the History of Philosophy 34 (4):535-548.
  43. Nicholas Jolley (1994). Intellect and Illumination in Malebranche. Journal of the History of Philosophy 32 (2):209-224.
    One of the hallmarks of Descartes' philosophy is the doctrine that the human mind has a faculty of pure intellect. This doctrine is so central to Descartes' teaching that it is difficult to believe that any of his disciplines would abandon it. Yet this is what happened in the case of Malebranche. This paper argues that in his later philosophy Malebranche adopted a theory of divine illumination which leaves no room for a Cartesian doctrine of pure intellect. It is further (...)
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  44. Nicholas Jolley (1990). The Light of the Soul: Theories of Ideas in Leibniz, Malebranche, and Descartes. Oxford University Press.
    The concept of an "idea" played a central role in 17th-century theories of mind and knowledge, but philosophers were divided over the nature of ideas. This book examines an important, but little-known, debate on this question in the work of Leibniz, Malebranche, and Descartes. Looking closely at the issues involved, as well as the particular context in which the debate took place, Jolley demonstrates that the debate has serious implications for a number of major topics in 17th-century philosophy.
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  45. Nicholas Jolley (1988). Leibniz and Malebranche on Innate Ideas. Philosophical Review 97 (1):71-91.
    This paper seeks to reconstruct an important controversy between leibniz and malebranche over innate ideas. It is argued that this controversy is in some ways more illuminating than the better-Known debate between leibniz and locke, For malebranche's objections to innate ideas raise fundamental questions concerning the status of dispositions and the relationship between logic and psychology. The paper shows that in order to meet malebranche's objections, Leibniz adopts a strategy which is doubly reductionist: ideas are reduced to dispositions to think (...)
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  46. P. J. E. Kail (2008). Hume, Malebranche and 'Rationalism'. Philosophy 83 (3):311-332.
    Traditionally Hume is seen as offering an 'empiricist' critique of 'rationalism'. This view is often illustrated -- or rejected -- by comparing Hume's views with those of Descartes'. However the textual evidence shows that Hume's most sustained engagement with a canonical 'rationalist' is with Nicolas Malebranche. The author shows that the fundamental differences (among the many similarities) between the two on the self and causal power do indeed rest on a principled distinction between 'rationalism' and 'empiricism', and that there is (...)
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  47. P. J. E. Kail (2008). On Hume's Appropriation of Malebranche: Causation and Self. European Journal of Philosophy 16 (1):55–80.
  48. Nancy Kendrick (2002). "Presence" and "Likeness" in Arnauld's Critique of Malebranche. Midwest Studies in Philosophy 26 (1):(2002), 205–212.
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  49. Minna Koivuniemi (2011). L'homme Cartésien – La 'Force Qu'a l'Âme de Mouvoir le Corps', Descartes, Malebranche. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 19 (3):566 - 569.
    British Journal for the History of Philosophy, Volume 19, Issue 3, Page 566-569, May 2011.
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  50. Mark A. Kulstad (1999). Leibnizian Meditations on Monism, Force, and Substance, in Relation to Descartes, Spinoza and Malebranche. The Leibniz Review 9:17-42.
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