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  1. Ruth Abbey (1999). Circles, Ladders and Stars: Nietzsche on Friendship. Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 2 (4):50-73.
    One of the major purposes of this article is to show that friendship was one of Nietzsche's central concerns and that he shared Aristotle's belief that it takes higher and lower forms. Yet Nietzsche's interest in friendship is overlooked in much of the secondary literature. An important reason for this is that this interest is most evident in the works of his middle period, and these tend to be neglected in commentaries on Nietzsche. In the works of the middle period, (...)
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  2. Ruth Abbey (1999). The Roots of Ressentiment. New Nietzsche Studies 3 (3-4):47-61.
    Despite its centrality for an understanding of Nietzsche's thought, the term ressentiment does not appear in his writings before Beyond Good and Evil. This article argues that the roots of the idea of ressentiment appear in his middle period writings when he discusses vanity [die Eitelkeit].
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  3. Mark Alfano (forthcoming). Virtue in Nietzsche's Drive Psychology. In Tom Stern (ed.), The New Cambridge Companion to Nietzsche. Cambridge University Press
  4. Mark Alfano (forthcoming). A Schooling in Contempt: Emotions and the Pathos of Distance. In Paul Katsafanas (ed.), Routledge Philosophy Minds: Nietzsche. Routledge
    Nietzsche scholars have developed an interest in his use of “thick” moral psychological concepts such as virtues and emotions. This development coincides with a renewed interest among both philosophers and social scientists in virtues, the emotions, and moral psychology more generally. Contemporary work in empirical moral psychology posits contempt and disgust as both basic emotions and moral foundations of normative codes. While virtues can be individuated in various ways, one attractive principle of individuation is to index them to characteristic emotions (...)
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  5. Mark Alfano (forthcoming). Genealogy Revisited. [REVIEW] Journal of Moral Philosophy.
    “Another Nietzsche’s On the Genealogy of Morality?” one might be excused for asking at the sight of Simon May’s new collection. This volume has to contend for shelf space with homonymic monographs by Lawrence Hatab (2008) and David Owen (2007), as well as Daniel Conway’s (2008) Nietzsche’s On the Genealogy of Morals, a compilation of the same name edited by Christa Acampora (2006), and Brian Leiter’s Nietzsche on Morality (2002). Add to this that Hatab contributes to May’s collection, Owen and (...)
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  6. Mark Alfano (forthcoming). How One Becomes What One Is: The Case for a Nietzschean Conception of Character Development. In Iskra Fileva (ed.), Perspectives on Character. Oxford
  7. Mark Alfano (forthcoming). The Epistemic Function of Contempt and Humor in Nietzsche. In Michelle Mason (ed.), The Moral Psychology of Contempt. Rowman & Littlefield
  8. Mark Alfano (2016). Swanton, Christine. The Virtue Ethics of Hume & Nietzsche. [REVIEW] Ethics 126 (4):1120-1124.
    This book has a noble aim: to free virtue ethics from the grip of the neo-Aristotelianism that limits its scope in contemporary Anglophone philosophy. Just as there are deontological views that are not Kant’s or even Kantian, just as there are consequentialist views that are not Bentham’s or even utilitarian, so, Swanton contends, there are viable virtue ethical views that are not Aristotle’s or even Aristotelian. Indeed, the history of both Eastern and Western philosophy suggests that the majority of normative (...)
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  9. Mark Alfano (2013). The Most Agreeable of All Vices: Nietzsche as Virtue Epistemologist. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 21 (4):767-790.
    It’s been argued with some justice by commentators from Walter Kaufmann to Thomas Hurka that Nietzsche’s positive ethical position is best understood as a variety of virtue theory – in particular, as a brand of perfectionism. For Nietzsche, value flows from character. Less attention has been paid, however, to the details of the virtues he identifies for himself and his type. This neglect, along with Nietzsche’s frequent irony and non-standard usage, has obscured the fact that almost all the virtues he (...)
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  10. Keith Ansell Pearson (ed.) (2006). A Companion to Nietzsche. Wiley-Blackwell.
    _A Companion to Nietzsche_ provides a comprehensive guide to all the main aspects of Nietzsche's philosophy, profiling the most recent research and trends in scholarship. Brings together an international roster of both rising stars and established scholars, including many of the leading commentators and interpreters of Nietzsche. Showcases the latest trends in Nietzsche scholarship, such as the renewed focus on Nietzsche’s philosophy of time, of nature, and of life. Includes clearly organized sections on Art, Nature, and Individuation; Nietzsche's New Philosophy (...)
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  11. Keith Ansell-Pearson (2005). Nietzsche's Critiques: The Kantian Foundations of His Thought (Review). Journal of Nietzsche Studies 29 (1):54-71.
  12. Keith Ansell-Pearson (1994). An Introduction to Nietzsche as Political Thinker: The Perfect Nihilist. Cambridge University Press.
    This is a lively and engaging introduction to the contentious topic of Nietzsche's political thought. It traces the development of Nietzsche's thinking on politics from his earliest writings to the mature work in which he advocates aristocratic radicalism as opposed to 'petty' European nationalism. The key ideas of the will to power, eternal return and the overman are discussed and all Nietzsche's major works analysed in detail, such as Beyond Good and Evil and The Genealogy of Morals, within the context (...)
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  13. Rebecca Bamford (2007). The Virtue of Shame: Defending Nietzsche’s Critique of Mitleid. In Gudrun von Tevenar (ed.), Nietzsche and Ethics. Peter Lang Verlag
    I argue that moral intuitions about Nietzsche as an exemplar of practical cruelty can be overturned. My argument is based upon the possibility of abandoning the notion of pure and unmediated passivity as intrinsic to the phenomena of human suffering and of Mitleid, as identified by Nietzsche. I claim that wrongly identifying intrinsic passivity in the phenomenology of Mitleid and of suffering generates the moral sceptical intuition. Once this case of mistaken identity is uncovered, 1 suggest, there is no reason (...)
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  14. Gottfried Benn (2000). Nietzsche After 50 Years (1950). New Nietzsche Studies 4 (3-4):127-137.
  15. Sandrine Berges (2001). Plato, Nietzsche, and Sublimation. Phronimon 3 (1):1-21.
    In this paper I aim to refute the claim that Plato and Nietzsche are at opposite poles regarding the treatment of the non-rational elements of the soul, and argue that, instead, they share a complex and psychologically rich view of the role of reason towards the appetites and the emotions. My argument makes use of the Freudian distinction between sublimation, i.e. the re-channelling of certain undesirable appetitive and emotional forces towards more beneficial ends, and repression. I show that both Plato (...)
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  16. Lorenzo Greco (2015). Christine Swanton, The Virtue Ethics of Hume and Nietzsche (Chichester: Wiley-Blackwell, 2015). [REVIEW] Rivista di Filosofia 107 (1):173-74.
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  17. Daniel I. Harris (2015). Nietzsche and Virtue. Journal of Value Inquiry 49 (3):325-328.
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  18. Patrick Hassan (2016). Nietzsche on Human Greatness. Journal of Value Inquiry:1-18.
    In this paper, I take it to be uncontroversial that increasingly into his philosophical career, Nietzsche believed human greatness to be an appropriately valuable goal, at least for certain types of people. But while Nietzsche's repeated paradigms of greatness include figures as seemingly diverse as Beethoven, Goethe, Shakespeare, Cesare Borgia, Julius Caesar, it is unclear precisely what great-making property (or properties) Nietzsche considers these figures to share. I consider two possible approaches which have shaped the terrain of the secondary literature (...)
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  19. Grace Hunt (2013). Redeeming Resentment: Nietzsche's Affirmative Riposts. American Dialectic (No. 2/3).
  20. David McPherson (2016). Nietzsche, Cosmodicy, and the Saintly Ideal. Philosophy 91 (1):39-67.
    In this essay I examine Nietzsche’s shifting understanding of the saintly ideal with an aim to bringing out its philosophical importance, particularly with respect to what I call the problem of ‘cosmodicy’, i.e., the problem of justifying life in the world as worthwhile in light of the prevalent reality of suffering. In his early account Nietzsche understood the saint as embodying the supreme achievement of a self-transcending ‘feeling of oneness and identity with all living things’, while in his later account (...)
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  21. Talia Welsh (2014). Philosophy as Self-Transformation: Shusterman's Somaesthetics and Dependent Bodies. Journal of Speculative Philosophy 28 (4):489-504.
    Part of Nietzsche’s blistering attack against Western morality is the argument that it stems from a lack of self-control that the weak have. Since the moralist cannot control and direct his own sexuality, he creates a “universal” set of moral values to be imposed externally on everyone. Despite the enchanting diversity of life, moralists prefer drab worlds of absolutes to help bolster their weak-willed selves: “Let us finally consider how naïve it is altogether to say: ‘Man ought to be such (...)
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