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  1. Christa Davis Acampora (1997). Peter Berkowitz, Nietzsche: The Ethics of An Immoralist. [REVIEW] Man and World 30 (4):490-496.
  2. Tom Bailey (2003). Nietzsche: His Philosophy of Contradictions and the Contradictions of His Philosophy (Review). Journal of Nietzsche Studies 25 (1):95-100.
  3. Johannes Balthasar (1990). Metaphysics, Art and Language in Early Works of Nietzsche. Philosophy and History 23 (2):116-116.
  4. Harold Bloom (ed.) (1987). Friedrich Nietzsche. Chelsea House Publishers.
  5. Brian Bowles (1999). Sloughing One's Skin. Southwest Philosophy Review 15 (2):25-38.
    Nietzsche's perspectivism can be seen as a two-leveled cure for dogmatism. On the one hand, perspectivism amounts to the dismissal of the metaphysical world and the acknowledgement of the esential incompleteness of all knowledge insofar as knowledge is only and always perspectival. On the other hand, perspectivism is an affirmation of the central role the affects play in all interpretations of the world; consequently, it presents itself as a summary rejection of the notion of disinterested contemplation or knowledge. Nietzsche's theory (...)
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  6. Manuel Dries (2008). Nietzsche's Critique of Staticism. In M. Dries (ed.), Nietzsche on Time and History. Walter de Gruyter
    Why are we still intrigued by Nietzsche? This chapter argues that sustained interest stems from Nietzsche’s challenge to what we might call the ‘staticism’ inherent in our ordinary experience. Staticism can be defined, roughly speaking, as the view that the world is a collection of enduring, re-identifiable objects that change only very gradually and according to determinate laws. The chapter discusses Nietzsche’s rejection of remnants of staticism in Hegel and Schopenhauer (1). It outlines why Nietzsche deems belief in any variant (...)
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  7. Ingeborg Heidemann (1962). Nietzsches kritik der metaphysik. Kant-Studien 53 (1-4):507-543.
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  8. Erman Kaplama (2016). Kantian and Nietzschean Aesthetics of Human Nature: A Comparison Between the Beautiful/Sublime and Apollonian/Dionysian Dualities. Cosmos and History: The Journal of Natural and Social Philosophy 12 (1):166-217.
    Both for Kant and for Nietzsche, aesthetics must not be considered as a systematic science based merely on logical premises but rather as a set of intuitively attained artistic ideas that constitute or reconstitute the sensible perceptions and supersensible representations into a new whole. Kantian and Nietzschean aesthetics are both aiming to see beyond the forms of objects to provide explanations for the nobility and sublimity of human art and life. We can safely say that Kant and Nietzsche used the (...)
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  9. Erman Kaplama (2014). Cosmological Aesthetics Through the Kantian Sublime and Nietzschean Dionysian. UPA, Rowman & Littlefield.
    This book is founded on a close reading of Kant’s Opus Postumum in order both to explore the essential motivation that drove Kant to write a last comprehensive magnum opus and, by doing so, to show the essential link between his aesthetics and the idea of Übergang, the title of this last work. For this work contains not only his dynamical theory of matter defining motion as preliminary to the notions of space and time, and the advanced version of his (...)
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  10. Erman Kaplama (2010). Introduction to Cosmological Aesthetics: The Kantian Sublime and Nietzschean Dionysian. International Journal of the Humanities 8 (2):69-84.
    This paper is founded on a close reading of Kant’s Opus Postumum in order both to explore the essential motivation that drove Kant to write a last comprehensive magnum opus and, by doing so, to show the essential link between his aesthetics and the idea of Übergang, the title of this last work. For this work contains not only his dynamical theory of matter defining motion as preliminary to the notions of space and time, and the advanced version of his (...)
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  11. Wolfgang Müller-Lauter (1974). Nietzsches lehre vom willen zur macht. Nietzsche-Studien 3 (1):1.
  12. Justin Remhof (forthcoming). Defending Nietzsche's Constructivism About Objects. European Journal of Philosophy.
    Nietzsche appears to adopt a radical Kantian view of objects called constructivism, which holds that the existence of all objects depends essentially on our practices. This essay provides a new reconstruction of Nietzsche’s argument for constructivism and responds to five pressing objections to reading Nietzsche as a constructivist that have not been addressed by commentators defending constructivist interpretations of Nietzsche.
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  13. Justin Remhof (2015). Nietzsche on Objects. Nietzsche-Studien 44 (1).
    Nietzsche was persistently concerned with what an object is and how different views of objects lead to different views of facts, causality, personhood, substance, truth, mathematics and logic, and even nihilism. Yet his treatment of objects is incredibly puzzling. In many passages he assumes that objects such as trees and leaves, tables and chairs, and dogs and cats are just ordinary entities of experience. In other places he reports that objects do not exist. Elsewhere he claims that objects exist, but (...)
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  14. Mattia Riccardi (2009). “Der faule Fleck des Kantischen Kriticismus”. Erscheinung und Ding an sich bei Nietzsche. Schwabe.
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  15. Ariela Tubert (2015). Nietzsche's Existentialist Freedom. Journal of Nietzsche Studies 46 (3):409-424.
    Following Robert C. Solomon’s Living with Nietzsche, I defend an interpretation of Nietzsche’s views about freedom that are in line with the existentialist notion of self-creation. Given Nietzsche’s emphasis on the limitations on human freedom, his critique of the notion of causa sui (self-creation out of nothing), and his critique of morality for relying on the assumption that we have free will, it may be surprising that he could be taken seriously as an existentialist—existentialism characteristically takes freedom and self-creation to (...)
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