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  1. Stefano G. Azzarà, Paolo Ercolani, Emanuela Susca & Domenico Losurdo (eds.) (2011). Dialettica, Storia E Conflitto: Il Proprio Tempo Appreso Nel Pensiero: Festschrift in Onore di Domenico Losurdo: Vii Congresso Internazionale, Urbino, Palazzo Albani, 18-20 Novembre 2011. [REVIEW] La Scuola di Pitagora.
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  2. Carl B. Sachs (2011). What Is To Be Overcome? Nietzsche, Carnap, and Modernism as the Overcoming of Metaphysic. History of Philosophy Quarterly 28 (3):303-318..
    I examine why Carnap ended his "The Overcoming of Metaphysics" with admiration for Nietzsche, and contextualize his admiration for Nietzsche within their shared commitment to 'modernism.' I show that Carnap's modernism helps explain his enthusiasm for symbolic logic and his attitude towards metaphysics.
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  3. Gregor Schiemann (2014). Wahrheitsgewissheitsverluste. Nietzsches und Helmholtz’ Wissenschaftsauffassung im Anbruch der Moderne. In H. Heit (ed.), Nietzsches Philosophie des Wissens im Kontext des 19. Jahrhunderts. de Gruyter.
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Nietzsche: Metaphysics
  1. Harold Alderman (1972). Nietzsche's Masks. International Philosophical Quarterly 12 (3):365-388.
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  2. David B. Allison (ed.) (1977/1985). The New Nietzsche: Contemporary Styles of Interpretation. Mit Press.
    The fifteen essays, written by such eminent scholars as Derrida, Heidegger, Deleuze, Klossowski, and Blanchot, focus on the Nietzschean concepts of the Will to ...
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Nietzsche: Will to Power
  1. R. Lanier Anderson (2012). The Will to Power in Science and Philosophy. In Helmut Heit, Günter Abel & Marco Brusotti (eds.), Nietzsches Wissenschaftsphilosophie. de Gruyter.
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  2. Ciano Aydin (2007). Nietzsche on Reality as Will to Power: Toward an "Organization–Struggle" Model. Journal of Nietzsche Studies 33 (1):25-48.
  3. Tom Bailey (2003). Nietzsche: His Philosophy of Contradictions and the Contradictions of His Philosophy (Review). Journal of Nietzsche Studies 25 (1):95-100.
  4. Charles Bambach (2013). Nietzsche and Antiquity: His Reaction and Response to the Classical Tradition Ed. By Paul Bishop (Review). Journal of Nietzsche Studies 44 (1):113-115.
    The hermeneutic thicket surrounding the question of Nietzsche and the Greeks is both dense and forbidding. Every attempt to pose this question confronts a wide range of difficult issues. Who is “Nietzsche”? Which “Greeks”? What range of concerns? methods? disciplinary boundaries? How to think the relation between the early Nietzsche of the Basel years and the later Nietzsche post-Zarathustra? Where to turn for help in working through the palimpsest of interpretations that have formed the Nietzschebild in our time? To simply (...)
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  5. Charles Bambach (2003). Nietzsehe's Philosophy of the Etemal Recurrence of the Same. New Nietzsche Studies 5 (3/4/1/2):208-213.
  6. Martin Heidegger (1979/1991). Nietzsche. Harpersanfrancisco.
    A landmark discussion between two great thinkers, vital to an understanding of twentieth-century philosophy and intellectual history.
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  7. Wolfgang Müller-Lauter (1982). Das willenswesen und der übermensch ein beitrag zu heideggers Nietzsche-interpretationen. Nietzsche-Studien 10 (1).
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  8. Wolfgang Müller-Lauter (1974). Nietzsches lehre vom willen zur macht. Nietzsche-Studien 3 (1).
  9. David Rowe (2012). The Eternal Return of the Same: Nietzsche's "Valueless" Revaluation of All Values. Parrhesia (15):71-86.
    In this paper I argue that Nietzsche should be understood as a “thorough-going nihilist”. Rather than broaching two general projects of destroying current values and constructing new ones, I argue that Nietzsche should be understood only as a destroyer of values. I do this by looking at Nietzsche’s views on nihilism and the role played by Nietzsche’s cyclical view of time, or his doctrine of the eternal recurrence of the same. I provide a typology of nihilisms, as they are found (...)
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  10. Stefan Lorenz Sorgner (2007). Metaphysics Without Truth: On the Importance of Consistency Within Nietzsche's Philosophy. Marquette University Press.
Nietzsche: Eternal Recurrence
  1. David B. Allison (2007). Nietzsche's Life Sentence. New Nietzsche Studies 7 (3-4):141-150.
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  2. Thomas J. J. Altizer (1994). Nietzsche and Asian Thought. International Studies in Philosophy 26 (1):130-131.
  3. S. M. Amadae (2004). Nietzsche's Thirst For India. Idealistic Studies 34 (3):239-262.
    This essay represents a novel contribution to Nietzschean studies by combining an assessment of Friedrich Nietzsche’s challenging uses of “truth” and the “eternal return” with his insights drawn from Indian philosophies. Specifically, drawing on Martin Heidegger’s Nietzsche, I argue that Nietzsche’s critique of a static philosophy of being underpinning conceptual truth is best understood in line with the Theravada Buddhist critique of “self ” and “ego” as transitory. In conclusion, I find that Nietzsche’s “eternal return” can be understood as a (...)
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  4. Keith Ansell-Pearson (2006). The Eternal Return of the Overhuman: The Weightiest Knowledge and the Abyss of Light. Journal of Nietzsche Studies 30 (1):1-21.
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  5. Charles Bambach (2003). Nietzsehe's Philosophy of the Etemal Recurrence of the Same. New Nietzsche Studies 5 (3/4/1/2):208-213.
  6. Nandita Biswas Mellamphy (2011). The Three Stigmata of Friedrich Nietzsche: Political Physiology in the Age of Nihilism. Palgrave Macmillan.
  7. Peter Bornedal (2006). Different Kinds of Ecstasy: Review of Three Recent Works on ‚Eternal Recurrence'. [REVIEW] Nietzsche-Studien 35 (1).
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  8. Peter Bornedal (2006). Eternal Recurrence in Inner-Mental-Life. Nietzsche-Studien 35 (1).
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  9. Philippe Gagnon (2011). Nietzsche's Eternal Return of the Same. Twin Cities Review of Political Philosophy 1:25-26.
    In this shorter piece, at the instigation of a former philosophy student, I accepted to contribute alongside two other writers to the "Expert Help" rubric, and attempted to explain the genesis in Nietzsche's mind of the conception of the eternal recurrence. I lay stress on both the internal contradiction that the solitary of Sils-Maria was trying to resolve and the secret desire that this cherished and embraced rather than demonstrated theory be true in the face of conflicting evidence, and I (...)
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  10. Martin Heidegger (1979/1991). Nietzsche. Harpersanfrancisco.
    A landmark discussion between two great thinkers, vital to an understanding of twentieth-century philosophy and intellectual history.
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  11. Nadeem J. Z. Hussain, Eternal Recurrence and Nihilism: Adding Weight to the Unbearable Lightness of Action.
    (Version 2.4) I have argued elsewhere for ascribing an error theory about all normative and evaluative judgements to Nietzsche. Such a nihilism brings with it a puzzle: how could we—or at least the select few of us being addressed by Nietzsche—continue in the face of this nihilism? This is a philosophical puzzle and so, defeasibly, an interpretive puzzle. If there is no theory it would make sense for Nietzsche to have about how the select few could go on, then this (...)
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  12. Wolfgang Müller-Lauter (1998). Nietzsche und Heidegger als nihilistische Denker. Nietzsche-Studien 27 (1).
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  13. Wolfgang Müller-Lauter (1982). Das willenswesen und der übermensch ein beitrag zu heideggers Nietzsche-interpretationen. Nietzsche-Studien 10 (1).
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  14. David Rowe (2012). The Eternal Return of the Same: Nietzsche's "Valueless" Revaluation of All Values. Parrhesia (15):71-86.
    In this paper I argue that Nietzsche should be understood as a “thorough-going nihilist”. Rather than broaching two general projects of destroying current values and constructing new ones, I argue that Nietzsche should be understood only as a destroyer of values. I do this by looking at Nietzsche’s views on nihilism and the role played by Nietzsche’s cyclical view of time, or his doctrine of the eternal recurrence of the same. I provide a typology of nihilisms, as they are found (...)
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  15. Stefan Lorenz Sorgner (2007). Metaphysics Without Truth: On the Importance of Consistency Within Nietzsche's Philosophy. Marquette University Press.
  16. Robert D. Stolorow (2010). Heidegger's Nietzsche, the Doctrine of Eternal Return, and the Phenomenology of Human Finitude. Journal of Phenomenological Psychology 41 (1):106-114.
    Nietzsche’s doctrine of the eternal return of the same, seen through the lens of Heidegger’s interpretation, captures the groundlessness of existence in a technological world devoid of normative significance. The author contends that the temporality depicted poetically in the thought of eternal return is the traumatic temporality of human finitude, to which Nietzsche was exposed at the age of 4 when the death of his father shattered his world. Nietzsche’s metaphysical position is seen as a metaphorical window into the phenomenology (...)
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Nietzsche: Critique of Traditional Metaphysics
  1. Christa Davis Acampora (1997). Peter Berkowitz, Nietzsche: The Ethics of An Immoralist. [REVIEW] Man and World 30 (4):490-496.
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  2. Tom Bailey (2003). Nietzsche: His Philosophy of Contradictions and the Contradictions of His Philosophy (Review). Journal of Nietzsche Studies 25 (1):95-100.
  3. Johannes Balthasar (1990). Metaphysics, Art and Language in Early Works of Nietzsche. Philosophy and History 23 (2):116-116.
  4. Harold Bloom (ed.) (1987). Friedrich Nietzsche. Chelsea House Publishers.
  5. Manuel Dries (2008). Nietzsche's Critique of Staticism. In M. Dries (ed.), Nietzsche on Time and History. Walter de Gruyter.
    Why are we still intrigued by Nietzsche? This chapter argues that sustained interest stems from Nietzsche’s challenge to what we might call the ‘staticism’ inherent in our ordinary experience. Staticism can be defined, roughly speaking, as the view that the world is a collection of enduring, re-identifiable objects that change only very gradually and according to determinate laws. The chapter discusses Nietzsche’s rejection of remnants of staticism in Hegel and Schopenhauer (1). It outlines why Nietzsche deems belief in any variant (...)
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  6. Ingeborg Heidemann (1962). Nietzsches kritik der metaphysik. Kant-Studien 53 (1-4):507-543.
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  7. Wolfgang Müller-Lauter (1974). Nietzsches lehre vom willen zur macht. Nietzsche-Studien 3 (1).
Nietzsche: Time, Being and Becoming
  1. S. M. Amadae (2004). Nietzsche's Thirst For India. Idealistic Studies 34 (3):239-262.
    This essay represents a novel contribution to Nietzschean studies by combining an assessment of Friedrich Nietzsche’s challenging uses of “truth” and the “eternal return” with his insights drawn from Indian philosophies. Specifically, drawing on Martin Heidegger’s Nietzsche, I argue that Nietzsche’s critique of a static philosophy of being underpinning conceptual truth is best understood in line with the Theravada Buddhist critique of “self ” and “ego” as transitory. In conclusion, I find that Nietzsche’s “eternal return” can be understood as a (...)
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  2. Manuel Dries (2008). Nietzsche's Critique of Staticism. In M. Dries (ed.), Nietzsche on Time and History. Walter de Gruyter.
    Why are we still intrigued by Nietzsche? This chapter argues that sustained interest stems from Nietzsche’s challenge to what we might call the ‘staticism’ inherent in our ordinary experience. Staticism can be defined, roughly speaking, as the view that the world is a collection of enduring, re-identifiable objects that change only very gradually and according to determinate laws. The chapter discusses Nietzsche’s rejection of remnants of staticism in Hegel and Schopenhauer (1). It outlines why Nietzsche deems belief in any variant (...)
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  3. Wolfgang Müller-Lauter (1998). Nietzsche und Heidegger als nihilistische Denker. Nietzsche-Studien 27 (1).
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  4. David Rowe (2012). The Eternal Return of the Same: Nietzsche's "Valueless" Revaluation of All Values. Parrhesia (15):71-86.
    In this paper I argue that Nietzsche should be understood as a “thorough-going nihilist”. Rather than broaching two general projects of destroying current values and constructing new ones, I argue that Nietzsche should be understood only as a destroyer of values. I do this by looking at Nietzsche’s views on nihilism and the role played by Nietzsche’s cyclical view of time, or his doctrine of the eternal recurrence of the same. I provide a typology of nihilisms, as they are found (...)
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  5. David Emmanuel Rowe (2013). Nietzsche's 'Anti-Naturalism'in 'The Four Great Errors'. International Journal of Philosophical Studies 21 (2):256 - 276.
    This paper is primarily a response to ?analytically-minded? philosophers, such as Maudemarie Clark and Brian Leiter, who push for a ?naturalistic? interpretation of Nietzsche. In particular, this paper will consider Leiter?s (2007) discussion of Nietzsche?s chapter in Twilight of the Idols, ?The Four Great Errors?, and argue that Leiter has misinterpreted this chapter in at least four ways. I provide a superior interpretation of this chapter, which argues that Nietzsche is using a transcendental style of argument to argue against a (...)
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  6. Christoph Schuringa (2011). Time and Becoming in Nietzsche's Thought. By Robin Small. London/New York: Continuum, 2010, Pp. 202. [REVIEW] Philosophy 86 (1):134-38.
    Nietzsche repeatedly portrays himself as an advocate of what he calls a ‘philosophy of becoming’. While in his early Untimely Meditations he had considered the ‘doctrine of sovereign becoming’ to be ‘true but deadly’, from the middle-period Human, All Too Human up to and including his last writings he urges us to embrace this doctrine wholeheartedly. He consistently links the view of the world as being in a state of constant flux with the teachings of Heraclitus, the one philosopher whom (...)
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Nietzsche: Metaphysics, Misc
  1. David B. Allison (1990). A DIET OF WORMS. Aposiopetic Rhetoric in Beyond Good and Evil. Nietzsche-Studien 19 (1).
  2. Thomas J. J. Altizer (1994). Nietzsche and Asian Thought. International Studies in Philosophy 26 (1):130-131.
  3. Keith Ansell-Pearson (ed.) (2006). A Companion to Nietzsche. Blackwell Pub..
    A Companion to Nietzsche provides a comprehensive guide to all the main aspects of Nietzsche's philosophy, profiling the most recent research and trends in scholarship. Brings together an international roster of both rising stars and established scholars, including many of the leading commentators and interpreters of Nietzsche. Showcases the latest trends in Nietzsche scholarship, such as the renewed focus on Nietzsche’s philosophy of time, of nature, and of life. Includes clearly organized sections on Art, Nature, and Individuation; Nietzsche's New Philosophy (...)
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  4. Keith Ansell-Pearson (2005). Nietzsche's Critiques: The Kantian Foundations of His Thought (Review). Journal of Nietzsche Studies 29 (1):54-71.
  5. Luis M. Augusto (2005). Who's Afraid of Idealism? University Press of America.
    In Who's Afraid of Idealism? the philosophical concept of idealism, the extent to which reality is mind-made, is examined in new light. Author Luis M. Augusto explores epistemological idealism, at the source of all other kinds of idealism, from the viewpoints of Immanuel Kant and Friedrich Nietzsche, two philosophers who spent a large part of their lives denigrating the very concept. Working from Kant and Nietzsche's viewpoints that idealism was a scandal to philosophy and the cause of nihilism, Augusto evaluates (...)
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  6. Pietro Gori (2009). “Sounding Out Idols”: Knowledge, History and Metaphysics in Human, All Too Human and Twilight of the Idols. In Volker Gerhard & Renate Reschke (eds.), Nietzscheforschung, vol. 16.
    Twilight of the Idols has a main role in Nietzsche’s work, since it represents the opening writing of his project of Transvaluation of all values. The task of this essay is sounding out idols, i.e. to disclose their lack of content, their being hollow. The theme of eternal idols is in this work strictly related to the idea of a ‘true’ world and, consequently, a study on this latter notion can contribute to a better comprehension of what does that emptiness (...)
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