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  1. Stefano G. Azzarà, Paolo Ercolani, Emanuela Susca & Domenico Losurdo (eds.) (2011). Dialettica, Storia E Conflitto: Il Proprio Tempo Appreso Nel Pensiero: Festschrift in Onore di Domenico Losurdo: Vii Congresso Internazionale, Urbino, Palazzo Albani, 18-20 Novembre 2011. [REVIEW] La Scuola di Pitagora.
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  2. James Conant (2006). The Dialectic of Perspectivism, II. SATS: Northern European Journal of Philosophy 7 (1):6-57.
    As we have seen, the crucial step in Nietzsche’s argument for his early doctrine is summed by in the following remark: ‘If we are forced to comprehend all things only under these forms, then it ceases to be amazing that in all things we actually comprehend nothing but these forms’ (1979, pp. 87–8). Before eventually learning to be suspicious of it, Nietzsche spends a good deal of time wondering instead what it would mean to live with the conclusion that (what (...)
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  3. Carl B. Sachs (2011). What Is To Be Overcome? Nietzsche, Carnap, and Modernism as the Overcoming of Metaphysic. History of Philosophy Quarterly 28 (3):303-318..
    I examine why Carnap ended his "The Overcoming of Metaphysics" with admiration for Nietzsche, and contextualize his admiration for Nietzsche within their shared commitment to 'modernism.' I show that Carnap's modernism helps explain his enthusiasm for symbolic logic and his attitude towards metaphysics.
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  4. Richard Schacht (1976). Truth and Value in Nietzsche: A Study of His Metaethics and Epistemology. Journal of the History of Philosophy 14 (4):490-494.
  5. Gregor Schiemann (2014). Wahrheitsgewissheitsverluste. Nietzsches und Helmholtz’ Wissenschaftsauffassung im Anbruch der Moderne. In H. Heit (ed.), Nietzsches Philosophie des Wissens im Kontext des 19. Jahrhunderts. De Gruyter
    Im ersten Teil verorte ich den historischen Kontext des Umbruchprozesses der Wissenschaft des 19. Jahrhunderts im Hinblick auf die Physik. Vom Beginn der Neuzeit bis weit ins 20. Jahrhundert hinein war die Physik die Leitwissenschaft in den Naturwissenschaften. Der Wandlungsprozess der auf sie bezogenen Wissenschaftsauffassungen setzt im 19. Jahrhundert bislang unangetastete, von der Antike herrührende Geltungsansprüche außer Kraft. Im zweiten Teil vergleiche ich Nietzsches Charakterisierung der Wissenschaften exemplarisch mit der von Hermann von Helmholtz. Helmholtz kann als ein herausragender Vertreter der (...)
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Nietzsche: Metaphysics
  1. Harold Alderman (1972). Nietzsche's Masks. International Philosophical Quarterly 12 (3):365-388.
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  2. David B. Allison (ed.) (1977/1985). The New Nietzsche: Contemporary Styles of Interpretation. MIT Press.
    The fifteen essays, written by such eminent scholars as Derrida, Heidegger, Deleuze, Klossowski, and Blanchot, focus on the Nietzschean concepts of the Will to ...
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Nietzsche: Will to Power
  1. R. Lanier Anderson (2012). The Will to Power in Science and Philosophy. In Helmut Heit, Günter Abel & Marco Brusotti (eds.), Nietzsches Wissenschaftsphilosophie. De Gruyter
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  2. Ciano Aydin (2007). Nietzsche on Reality as Will to Power: Toward an "Organization–Struggle" Model. Journal of Nietzsche Studies 33 (1):25-48.
  3. Tom Bailey (2003). Nietzsche: His Philosophy of Contradictions and the Contradictions of His Philosophy (Review). Journal of Nietzsche Studies 25 (1):95-100.
  4. Charles Bambach (2013). Nietzsche and Antiquity: His Reaction and Response to the Classical Tradition Ed. By Paul Bishop (Review). Journal of Nietzsche Studies 44 (1):113-115.
    The hermeneutic thicket surrounding the question of Nietzsche and the Greeks is both dense and forbidding. Every attempt to pose this question confronts a wide range of difficult issues. Who is “Nietzsche”? Which “Greeks”? What range of concerns? methods? disciplinary boundaries? How to think the relation between the early Nietzsche of the Basel years and the later Nietzsche post-Zarathustra? Where to turn for help in working through the palimpsest of interpretations that have formed the Nietzschebild in our time? To simply (...)
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  5. Charles Bambach (2003). Nietzsehe's Philosophy of the Etemal Recurrence of the Same. New Nietzsche Studies 5 (3/4/1/2):208-213.
  6. Martin Heidegger (1979/1991). Nietzsche. Harpersanfrancisco.
    A landmark discussion between two great thinkers, vital to an understanding of twentieth-century philosophy and intellectual history.
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  7. Thomas Mormann (2015). Moritz Schlicks Vorlesungen über Nietzsche und Schopenhauer. [REVIEW] Journal of General Philosophy of Science:DOI 10.1007/s10838-015-9298-4.
  8. Wolfgang Müller-Lauter (1982). Das willenswesen und der übermensch ein beitrag zu heideggers Nietzsche-interpretationen. Nietzsche-Studien 10 (1):132.
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  9. Wolfgang Müller-Lauter (1974). Nietzsches lehre vom willen zur macht. Nietzsche-Studien 3 (1):1.
  10. Tammy Nyden (1998). Salvation in a Naturalized World: The Role of the Will and Intellect in the Philosophies of Nietzsche and Spinoza. NASS (North American Spinoza Society) Monograph 7:17-31.
  11. David Rowe (2012). The Eternal Return of the Same: Nietzsche's "Valueless" Revaluation of All Values. Parrhesia 15:71-86.
    In this paper I argue that Nietzsche should be understood as a “thorough-going nihilist”. Rather than broaching two general projects of destroying current values and constructing new ones, I argue that Nietzsche should be understood only as a destroyer of values. I do this by looking at Nietzsche’s views on nihilism and the role played by Nietzsche’s cyclical view of time, or his doctrine of the eternal recurrence of the same. I provide a typology of nihilisms, as they are found (...)
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  12. Ivan Soll (1986). The Hopelessness of Hedonism and the Will to Power. International Studies in Philosophy 18 (2):97-112.
  13. Stefan Lorenz Sorgner (2007). Metaphysics Without Truth: On the Importance of Consistency Within Nietzsche's Philosophy. Marquette University Press.
Nietzsche: Eternal Recurrence
  1. David B. Allison (2007). Nietzsche's Life Sentence. New Nietzsche Studies 7 (3-4):141-150.
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  2. Thomas J. J. Altizer (1994). Nietzsche and Asian Thought. International Studies in Philosophy 26 (1):130-131.
  3. S. M. Amadae (2004). Nietzsche's Thirst For India. Idealistic Studies 34 (3):239-262.
    This essay represents a novel contribution to Nietzschean studies by combining an assessment of Friedrich Nietzsche’s challenging uses of “truth” and the “eternal return” with his insights drawn from Indian philosophies. Specifically, drawing on Martin Heidegger’s Nietzsche, I argue that Nietzsche’s critique of a static philosophy of being underpinning conceptual truth is best understood in line with the Theravada Buddhist critique of “self ” and “ego” as transitory. In conclusion, I find that Nietzsche’s “eternal return” can be understood as a (...)
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  4. Keith Ansell-Pearson (2006). The Eternal Return of the Overhuman: The Weightiest Knowledge and the Abyss of Light. Journal of Nietzsche Studies 30 (1):1-21.
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  5. Charles Bambach (2003). Nietzsehe's Philosophy of the Etemal Recurrence of the Same. New Nietzsche Studies 5 (3/4/1/2):208-213.
  6. Nandita Biswas Mellamphy (2011). The Three Stigmata of Friedrich Nietzsche: Political Physiology in the Age of Nihilism. Palgrave Macmillan.
  7. Peter Bornedal (2006). Different Kinds of Ecstasy: Review of Three Recent Works on ‚Eternal Recurrence'. [REVIEW] Nietzsche-Studien 35 (1):343-356.
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  8. Peter Bornedal (2006). Eternal Recurrence in Inner-Mental-Life. Nietzsche-Studien 35 (1):104-165.
    The essay introduces an interpretation of Nietzsche's Eternal-Recurrence-Thought distinct from traditional 'cosmological' as well as 'ethical' interpretations. The interpretation suggests that eternal recurrence is a conceptualization of intellectual and volitional processes. External recurrence is understood as a concept articulating peculiarities about mental processes related to knowledge and pleasure.Der Aufsatz stellt ein Interpretation von Nietzsches Gedanken der Ewigen Wiederkunft vor, die weder 'kosmologisch' noch 'ethisch' sein möchte. Diese Interpretation hält die Ewige Wiederkunft für eine Konzeptualisierung von Verstandes- und Willensakten. Der Begriff (...)
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  9. Philippe Gagnon (2011). Nietzsche's Eternal Return of the Same. Twin Cities Review of Political Philosophy 1:25-26.
    In this shorter piece, at the instigation of a former philosophy student, I accepted to contribute alongside two other writers to the "Expert Help" rubric, and attempted to explain the genesis in Nietzsche's mind of the conception of the eternal recurrence. I lay stress on both the internal contradiction that the solitary of Sils-Maria was trying to resolve and the secret desire that this cherished and embraced rather than demonstrated theory be true in the face of conflicting evidence, and I (...)
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  10. Martin Heidegger (1979/1991). Nietzsche. Harpersanfrancisco.
    A landmark discussion between two great thinkers, vital to an understanding of twentieth-century philosophy and intellectual history.
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  11. Nadeem J. Z. Hussain, Eternal Recurrence and Nihilism: Adding Weight to the Unbearable Lightness of Action.
    (Version 2.4) I have argued elsewhere for ascribing an error theory about all normative and evaluative judgements to Nietzsche. Such a nihilism brings with it a puzzle: how could we—or at least the select few of us being addressed by Nietzsche—continue in the face of this nihilism? This is a philosophical puzzle and so, defeasibly, an interpretive puzzle. If there is no theory it would make sense for Nietzsche to have about how the select few could go on, then this (...)
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  12. Wolfgang Müller-Lauter (1998). Nietzsche und Heidegger als nihilistische Denker. Nietzsche-Studien 27 (1):52-81.
  13. Wolfgang Müller-Lauter (1982). Das willenswesen und der übermensch ein beitrag zu heideggers Nietzsche-interpretationen. Nietzsche-Studien 10 (1):132.
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  14. David Rowe (2012). The Eternal Return of the Same: Nietzsche's "Valueless" Revaluation of All Values. Parrhesia 15:71-86.
    In this paper I argue that Nietzsche should be understood as a “thorough-going nihilist”. Rather than broaching two general projects of destroying current values and constructing new ones, I argue that Nietzsche should be understood only as a destroyer of values. I do this by looking at Nietzsche’s views on nihilism and the role played by Nietzsche’s cyclical view of time, or his doctrine of the eternal recurrence of the same. I provide a typology of nihilisms, as they are found (...)
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  15. Stefan Lorenz Sorgner (2007). Metaphysics Without Truth: On the Importance of Consistency Within Nietzsche's Philosophy. Marquette University Press.
  16. Robert D. Stolorow (2010). Heidegger's Nietzsche, the Doctrine of Eternal Return, and the Phenomenology of Human Finitude. Journal of Phenomenological Psychology 41 (1):106-114.
    Nietzsche’s doctrine of the eternal return of the same, seen through the lens of Heidegger’s interpretation, captures the groundlessness of existence in a technological world devoid of normative significance. The author contends that the temporality depicted poetically in the thought of eternal return is the traumatic temporality of human finitude, to which Nietzsche was exposed at the age of 4 when the death of his father shattered his world. Nietzsche’s metaphysical position is seen as a metaphorical window into the phenomenology (...)
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  17. Robert D. Stolorow & George E. Atwood (2013). The Tragic and the Metaphysical in Philosophy and Psychoanalysis. The Psychoanalytic Review 100 (3):405-421.
    This article elaborates a claim, first introduced by Wilhelm Dilthey, that metaphysics represents an illusory flight from the tragedy of human finitude. Metaphysics, of which psychoanalytic metapsychologies are a form, transforms the unbearable fragility and transience of all things human into an enduring, permanent, changeless reality, an illusory world of eternal truths. Three “clinical cases” illustrate this thesis in the work and lives of a philosopher and two psychoanalytic theorists: Friedrich Nietzsche and his metaphysical doctrine of the eternal return of (...)
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Nietzsche: Critique of Traditional Metaphysics
  1. Christa Davis Acampora (1997). Peter Berkowitz, Nietzsche: The Ethics of An Immoralist. [REVIEW] Man and World 30 (4):490-496.
  2. Tom Bailey (2003). Nietzsche: His Philosophy of Contradictions and the Contradictions of His Philosophy (Review). Journal of Nietzsche Studies 25 (1):95-100.
  3. Johannes Balthasar (1990). Metaphysics, Art and Language in Early Works of Nietzsche. Philosophy and History 23 (2):116-116.
  4. Harold Bloom (ed.) (1987). Friedrich Nietzsche. Chelsea House Publishers.
  5. Manuel Dries (2008). Nietzsche's Critique of Staticism. In M. Dries (ed.), Nietzsche on Time and History. Walter de Gruyter
    Why are we still intrigued by Nietzsche? This chapter argues that sustained interest stems from Nietzsche’s challenge to what we might call the ‘staticism’ inherent in our ordinary experience. Staticism can be defined, roughly speaking, as the view that the world is a collection of enduring, re-identifiable objects that change only very gradually and according to determinate laws. The chapter discusses Nietzsche’s rejection of remnants of staticism in Hegel and Schopenhauer (1). It outlines why Nietzsche deems belief in any variant (...)
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  6. Ingeborg Heidemann (1962). Nietzsches kritik der metaphysik. Kant-Studien 53 (1-4):507-543.
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  7. Wolfgang Müller-Lauter (1974). Nietzsches lehre vom willen zur macht. Nietzsche-Studien 3 (1):1.
  8. Ariela Tubert (forthcoming). Nietzsche's Existentialist Freedom. Journal of Nietzsche Studies.
    Following Solomon’s Living with Nietzsche, I defend an interpretation of Nietzsche’s views about freedom that are in line with the existentialist notion of self-creation. Given Nietzsche’s emphasis on the limitations on human freedom, his critique of the notion of causa sui (self-creation out of nothing), and his critique of morality for relying on the assumption that we have free will, it may be surprising that he could be taken seriously as an existentialist – existentialism characteristically takes freedom and self-creation to (...)
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Nietzsche: Time, Being and Becoming
  1. S. M. Amadae (2004). Nietzsche's Thirst For India. Idealistic Studies 34 (3):239-262.
    This essay represents a novel contribution to Nietzschean studies by combining an assessment of Friedrich Nietzsche’s challenging uses of “truth” and the “eternal return” with his insights drawn from Indian philosophies. Specifically, drawing on Martin Heidegger’s Nietzsche, I argue that Nietzsche’s critique of a static philosophy of being underpinning conceptual truth is best understood in line with the Theravada Buddhist critique of “self ” and “ego” as transitory. In conclusion, I find that Nietzsche’s “eternal return” can be understood as a (...)
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  2. Manuel Dries (2008). Nietzsche's Critique of Staticism. In M. Dries (ed.), Nietzsche on Time and History. Walter de Gruyter
    Why are we still intrigued by Nietzsche? This chapter argues that sustained interest stems from Nietzsche’s challenge to what we might call the ‘staticism’ inherent in our ordinary experience. Staticism can be defined, roughly speaking, as the view that the world is a collection of enduring, re-identifiable objects that change only very gradually and according to determinate laws. The chapter discusses Nietzsche’s rejection of remnants of staticism in Hegel and Schopenhauer (1). It outlines why Nietzsche deems belief in any variant (...)
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  3. Wolfgang Müller-Lauter (1998). Nietzsche und Heidegger als nihilistische Denker. Nietzsche-Studien 27 (1):52-81.
  4. David Rowe (2012). The Eternal Return of the Same: Nietzsche's "Valueless" Revaluation of All Values. Parrhesia 15:71-86.
    In this paper I argue that Nietzsche should be understood as a “thorough-going nihilist”. Rather than broaching two general projects of destroying current values and constructing new ones, I argue that Nietzsche should be understood only as a destroyer of values. I do this by looking at Nietzsche’s views on nihilism and the role played by Nietzsche’s cyclical view of time, or his doctrine of the eternal recurrence of the same. I provide a typology of nihilisms, as they are found (...)
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  5. David Emmanuel Rowe (2013). Nietzsche's 'Anti-Naturalism'in 'The Four Great Errors'. International Journal of Philosophical Studies 21 (2):256 - 276.
    This paper is primarily a response to ?analytically-minded? philosophers, such as Maudemarie Clark and Brian Leiter, who push for a ?naturalistic? interpretation of Nietzsche. In particular, this paper will consider Leiter?s (2007) discussion of Nietzsche?s chapter in Twilight of the Idols, ?The Four Great Errors?, and argue that Leiter has misinterpreted this chapter in at least four ways. I provide a superior interpretation of this chapter, which argues that Nietzsche is using a transcendental style of argument to argue against a (...)
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