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  1. Ruth Abbey (1999). Circles, Ladders and Stars: Nietzsche on Friendship. Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 2 (4):50-73.
    One of the major purposes of this article is to show that friendship was one of Nietzsche's central concerns and that he shared Aristotle's belief that it takes higher and lower forms. Yet Nietzsche's interest in friendship is overlooked in much of the secondary literature. An important reason for this is that this interest is most evident in the works of his middle period, and these tend to be neglected in commentaries on Nietzsche. In the works of the middle period, (...)
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  2. Mark Alfano (forthcoming). Genealogy Revisited. [REVIEW] Journal of Moral Philosophy.
    “Another Nietzsche’s On the Genealogy of Morality?” one might be excused for asking at the sight of Simon May’s new collection. This volume has to contend for shelf space with homonymic monographs by Lawrence Hatab (2008) and David Owen (2007), as well as Daniel Conway’s (2008) Nietzsche’s On the Genealogy of Morals, a compilation of the same name edited by Christa Acampora (2006), and Brian Leiter’s Nietzsche on Morality (2002). Add to this that Hatab contributes to May’s collection, Owen and (...)
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  3. Mark Alfano (forthcoming). How One Becomes What One is Called: On the Relation Between Traits and Trait-Terms in Nietzsche. Journal of Nietzsche Studies.
    Despite the recent surge of interest in Nietzsche’s moral psychology and his conceptions of character and virtue in particular, little attention has been paid to his treatment of the relation between character traits and the terms that designate them. In this paper, I argue for an interpretation of this relation: Nietzsche thinks there is a looping effect between the psychological disposition named by a character trait-term and the practice of using that term.
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  4. Mark Alfano (forthcoming). Nietzsche's Socio-Moral Psychology. Cambridge University Press.
  5. Mark Alfano (2013). The Most Agreeable of All Vices: Nietzsche as Virtue Epistemologist. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 21 (4):767-790.
    It’s been argued with some justice by commentators from Walter Kaufmann to Thomas Hurka that Nietzsche’s positive ethical position is best understood as a variety of virtue theory – in particular, as a brand of perfectionism. For Nietzsche, value flows from character. Less attention has been paid, however, to the details of the virtues he identifies for himself and his type. This neglect, along with Nietzsche’s frequent irony and non-standard usage, has obscured the fact that almost all the virtues he (...)
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  6. Tom Bailey (2003). Nietzsche's Conscience: Six Character Studies From the Genealogy. [REVIEW] New Nietzsche Studies 5 (3/4/1/2):213-215.
  7. Rebecca Bamford (2014). Mood and Aphorism in Nietzsche’s Campaign Against Morality. Pli: The Warwick Journal of Philosophy 25 (55-76).
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  8. Gottfried Benn (2000). Nietzsche After 50 Years (1950). New Nietzsche Studies 4 (3-4):127-137.
  9. Jane Bennett & William E. Connolly (2002). Contesting Nature/Culture: The Creative Character of Thinking. Journal of Nietzsche Studies 24 (1):148-163.
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  10. Sandrine Berges (2001). Plato, Nietzsche, and Sublimation. Phronimon 3 (1):1-21.
    In this paper I aim to refute the claim that Plato and Nietzsche are at opposite poles regarding the treatment of the non-rational elements of the soul, and argue that, instead, they share a complex and psychologically rich view of the role of reason towards the appetites and the emotions. My argument makes use of the Freudian distinction between sublimation, i.e. the re-channelling of certain undesirable appetitive and emotional forces towards more beneficial ends, and repression. I show that both Plato (...)
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  11. A. Shanks (1997). Bonhoeffer's Responseto Nietzsche. Studies in Christian Ethics 10 (2):79-85.
  12. Joseph Swenson (2014). Sublimation and Affirmation in Nietzsche's Psychology. Journal of Nietzsche Studies 45 (2):196-209.
    Nietzsche informs his readers frequently and seemingly with great confidence that his most original contributions to philosophy are best understood in the context of his development of a radically new kind of psychology. In his most enthusiastic moments, he even suggests that the originality of his thinking reveals not just a very, very good psychologist at work in his writing but also something more like the invention or inauguration of the field of psychology itself. It is this inaugural sense of (...)
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