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  1. Ruth Abbey (2004). Willing and Nothingness. [REVIEW] New Nietzsche Studies 5 (3-4):220-224.
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  2. Christa Davis Acampora (2009). The Affirmation of Life: Nietzsche on the Overcoming of Nihilism (Review). Journal of the History of Philosophy 47 (3):pp. 480-481.
    This is an important, curious book that is worth the effort it takes to get through it. It makes a distinctive case for the centrality of Nietzsche's grappling with nihilism, giving content to his notoriously thin notion of "affirming life," and it offers a nuanced account of "will to power," specifically in relation to Schopenhauer's "will to live." Among its curiosities are its method of extensive reliance on the collection of notes published as The Will to Power and its characterization (...)
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  3. Keith Ansell-Pearson (1997). Viroid Life: Perspectives on Nietzsche and the Transhuman Condition. Routledge.
    Exploring and critically examining the new realities of artificial life that confront us,Viroid Lifebrings together the tradition of Nietszchean thought with ...
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  4. Keith Ansell-Pearson (1994). An Introduction to Nietzsche as Political Thinker: The Perfect Nihilist. Cambridge University Press.
    This is a lively and engaging introduction to the contentious topic of Nietzsche's political thought. It traces the development of Nietzsche's thinking on politics from his earliest writings to the mature work in which he advocates aristocratic radicalism as opposed to 'petty' European nationalism. The key ideas of the will to power, eternal return and the overman are discussed and all Nietzsche's major works analysed in detail, such as Beyond Good and Evil and The Genealogy of Morals, within the context (...)
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  5. Piotr Augustyniak (2011). Bóg Mistrza Eckharta wobec Nietzscheańskiej krytyki chrześcijaństwa. Argument: Biannual Philosophical Journal 1 (2):211-224.
    English title: Master Eckhart’s God Confronted with Nietzschean Critique of Christianity. Author tries to demonstrate that the way of thinking about Christian God developed in the late Middle Ages by Master Eckhart goes beyond the interpretation which underlies Nietzsche’s criticism of Christianity as a religion of the other world. In the paper, Author first presents the said criticism, followed by the vision of God outlined by Eckhart. He demonstrates that Christianity, criticized by Nietzsche, uses a commonsense vision of God’s transcendence (...)
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  6. Charles Bambach (2013). Nietzsche and Antiquity: His Reaction and Response to the Classical Tradition Ed. By Paul Bishop (Review). Journal of Nietzsche Studies 44 (1):113-115.
    The hermeneutic thicket surrounding the question of Nietzsche and the Greeks is both dense and forbidding. Every attempt to pose this question confronts a wide range of difficult issues. Who is “Nietzsche”? Which “Greeks”? What range of concerns? methods? disciplinary boundaries? How to think the relation between the early Nietzsche of the Basel years and the later Nietzsche post-Zarathustra? Where to turn for help in working through the palimpsest of interpretations that have formed the Nietzschebild in our time? To simply (...)
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  7. Charles Bambach (2003). Nietzsehe's Philosophy of the Etemal Recurrence of the Same. New Nietzsche Studies 5 (3/4/1/2):208-213.
  8. Georges Bataille (1992). On Nietzsche. Paragon House.
    I live — if I choose to see things this way- — among a curious race that sees earth, its chance events and the vast interconnectedness of animals, mammals, ...
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  9. Georges Bataille & tr Boone, Bruce (1995). Book Review: On Nietzsche. [REVIEW] Philosophy and Literature 19 (1).
  10. Ernst Behler (1991). Confrontations: Derrida/Heidegger/Nietzsche. Stanford University Press.
    Introduction Undoubtedly it would be useful to interpret the "new Nietzsche," as he is often called, within the larger contexts of "Nietzsche and the ...
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  11. Harold Bloom (ed.) (1987). Friedrich Nietzsche. Chelsea House Publishers.
  12. Christine Daigle (2005). Le Nihilisme est-il un humanisme? Étude sur Nietzsche et Sartre. Presses de l'Université Laval.
    Dans son essai, Christine Daigle établit en quoi les philosophies de Nietzsche et Sartre convergent ou divergent en ce qui a trait à la problématique du nihilisme, à la quête de sens et à l'éthique.
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  13. Aaron Harper (forthcoming). Playing, Valuing, and Living: Examining Nietzsche’s Playful Response to Nihilism. Journal of Value Inquiry:1-19.
    Play is typically associated with carefree or frivolous activity, yet Nietzsche makes surprising claims about the nature of play. He insists that playfulness is the appropriate attitude for addressing the challenges of human life, and he describes maturity as the ability to play seriously like children. To understand Nietzsche’s serious play, some have emphasized the affinity between play and fiction. Notably, Nadeem Hussain has offered a fictionalist interpretation, according to which nothing has value in itself and valuing resembles make-believe. I (...)
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  14. Martin Heidegger (1979). Nietzsche. Harpersanfrancisco.
    A landmark discussion between two great thinkers, vital to an understanding of twentieth-century philosophy and intellectual history.
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  15. Steve Jones (2013). Twisted Pictures: Morality, Nihilism and Symbolic Suicide in the Saw Series. In James Aston & John Walliss (eds.), To See the Saw Movies: Essays on Torture Porn and Post-9/11 Horror. McFarland 105-122.
    Given that numerous critics have complained about Saw’s apparently confused sense of ethics, it is surprising that little attention has been paid to how morality operates in narrative itself. Coming from a Nietzschean perspective - specifically questioning whether the lead torturer Jigsaw is a passive or a radical nihilist - I seek to rectify that oversight. This philosophical reading of the series explores Jigsaw’s moral stance, which is complicated by his hypocrisy: I contend that this underpins critical complaints regarding the (...)
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  16. Paul Katsafanas (2015). Fugitive Pleasure and the Meaningful Life: Nietzsche on Nihilism and Higher Values. Journal of the American Philosophical Association 1 (3):396--416.
    Nietzsche’s discussions of nihilism are meant to bring into view an intriguing pathology of modern culture: that it is unable to sustain "higher values". This paper attempts to make sense of the nature and import of higher values. Higher values are a subset of final values. They are distinguished by their demandingness, susceptibility toward creating tragic conflicts, recruitment of a characteristic set of powerful emotions, perceived import, exclusionary nature, and their tendency to instantiate a community. The paper considers Nietzsche’s arguments (...)
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  17. John Marmysz (2014). Scotland as a Site of Sacrifice. Film International 12 (2):6-17.
    Friedrich Nietzsche delineates three stages of sacrificial behavior. The first stage consists of the sacrifice of particular human beings to a god. The second stage involves the sacrifice of one’s own instincts to a god, and the third stage culminates in the sacrifice of God himself. This last stage describes the death of God and signals the “final cruelty” of our present times. Our age is the age of nihilism, the point in history during which humans “sacrifice God for the (...)
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  18. John Marmysz (2003). Laughing at Nothing: Humor as a Response to Nihilism. SUNY Press.
    Disputing the common misconception that nihilism is wholly negative and necessarily damaging to the human spirit, John Marmysz offers a clear and complete definition to argue that it is compatible, and indeed preferably responded to, with an attitude of good humor. He carefully scrutinizes the phenomenon of nihilism as it appears in the works, lives, and actions of key figures in the history of philosophy, literature, politics, and theology, including Nietzsche, Heidegger, Camus, and Mishima. While suggesting that there ultimately is (...)
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  19. John Marmysz (1996). From Night to Day: Nihilism and the Living Dead. Film and Philosophy 3:138-143.
    Upon its release in 1968, George Romero's Night of the Living Dead was attacked by many critics as an exploitative low budget film of questionable moral value. I argue in this paper that Night of the Living Dead is indeed nihilistic, but in a deeper philosophical sense than the critics had in mind.
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  20. John C. McCarthy (2000). Nihilism Before Nietzsche. Review of Metaphysics 54 (1):140-143.
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  21. Wolfgang Müller-Lauter (1998). Nietzsche und Heidegger als nihilistische Denker. Nietzsche-Studien 27 (1):52-81.
  22. Ekaterina Poljakova (2006). Die „Bosheit“ der Russen. Nietzsche-Studien 35 (1):195-217.
    Ausgehend von zwei Aphorismen Nietzsches aus der Götzen-Dämmerung und einer Nachlass-Notiz zur "Bosheit" der Russen stellt die Abhandlung Nietzsches Moralkritik der russischen gegenüber, der Kritik Dostojewkis und Tolstojs and der 'westeuropäischen' "vernünfrigen' Moral, die wiederum aus Nietzsches Genealogie der Gegensätze der Werte, seiner Deutung der Moral, unter der Optik des Künstlers' und der Musik als 'Vorgeschichte' der Moral interpretiert wird. Aus Nietzsches Sicht auf Russland einerseits und der russischen Deutung Nietzsches als dem 'Russen' unter den 'westlichen' Philosophen andererseits erschließt sich (...)
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  23. Paul Prescott (2012). What Pessimism Is. Journal of Philosophical Research 37:337-356.
    On the standing view, pessimism is a philosophically intractable topic. Against the standing view, I hold that pessimism is a stance, or compound of attitudes, commitments and intentions. This stance is marked by certain beliefs—first and foremost, that the bad prevails over the good—which are subject to an important qualifying condition: they are always about outcomes and states of affairs in which one is personally invested. This serves to distinguish pessimism from other views with which it is routinely conflated— including (...)
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  24. Justin Remhof (2015). Naturalism, Causality, and Nietzsche’s Conception of Science. Journal of Nietzsche Studies 46 (1):110-119.
    There is a disagreement over how to understand Nietzsche’s view of science. According to what I call the Negative View, Nietzsche thinks science should be reconceived or superseded by another discourse, such as art, because it is nihilistic. By contrast, what I call the Positive View holds that Nietzsche does not think science is nihilistic, so he denies that it should be reinterpreted or overcome. Interestingly, defenders of each position can appeal to Nietzsche’s understanding of naturalism to support their interpretation. (...)
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  25. Justin Remhof (2015). Nietzsche on Objects. Nietzsche-Studien 44 (1).
    Nietzsche was persistently concerned with what an object is and how different views of objects lead to different views of facts, causality, personhood, substance, truth, mathematics and logic, and even nihilism. Yet his treatment of objects is incredibly puzzling. In many passages he assumes that objects such as trees and leaves, tables and chairs, and dogs and cats are just ordinary entities of experience. In other places he reports that objects do not exist. Elsewhere he claims that objects exist, but (...)
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  26. Mariano L. Rodríguez González (1995). Historia y nihilismo. Apuntes para una confrontación Nietzsche-Ortega / History and Nihilism. Notes for a Nietzsche-Ortega Confrontation. Convivium 8:87.
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  27. David Rowe (2012). The Eternal Return of the Same: Nietzsche's "Valueless" Revaluation of All Values. Parrhesia 15:71-86.
    In this paper I argue that Nietzsche should be understood as a “thorough-going nihilist”. Rather than broaching two general projects of destroying current values and constructing new ones, I argue that Nietzsche should be understood only as a destroyer of values. I do this by looking at Nietzsche’s views on nihilism and the role played by Nietzsche’s cyclical view of time, or his doctrine of the eternal recurrence of the same. I provide a typology of nihilisms, as they are found (...)
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  28. Ashley Woodward (2009). Nihilism in Postmodernity. The Davies Group.
    Nihilism in Postmodernity is an exploration of the nature of the problem of meaninglessness in the contemporary world through the philosophical traditions of nihilism and postmodernism. The author traces the advent of modern nihilism in the works of Nietzsche, Sartre, and Heidegger, before detailing the postmodern transformation of nihilism in the works of three major postmodern thinkers: Lyotard, Baudrillard, and Vattimo. He presents a qualified defense of their positions, arguing that while there is much under-appreciated value in their responses to (...)
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  29. Raymond Aaron Younis (2007). Nihilism Reconstruction and the Hero's Journey. In Angela Ndalianis Wendy Haslem & Chris Mackie (eds.), Super/Heroes. New Academia 97-111.
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  30. Gabriel Zamosc (2015). What Zarathustra Whispers. Nietzsche-Studien 44 (1):231-266.
    Name der Zeitschrift: Nietzsche-Studien Jahrgang: 44 Heft: 1 Seiten: 231-266. -/- Abstract: In this essay I defend my interpretation of the unheard words that Zarathustra whispers into Life’s ear in “The Other Dance Song” and that have long kept commentators puzzled. I argue that what Zarathustra whispers is that he knows that Life is pregnant with his child. Zarathustra’s ability to make Life pregnant depends on his overcoming of Eternal Recurrence which threatens to strangle him with disgust of human beings (...)
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  31. Gabriel Zamosc (2015). Life, Death, and Eternal Recurrence in Nietzsche's Zarathustra. The Agonist 8 (1&2).
    -/- This paper offers a preliminary interpretation of Nietzsche’s doctrine of Eternal Recurrence, according to which the doctrine constitutes a parable that, speaking of what is permanent in life, praises and justifies all that is impermanent. What is permanent, what always recurs, is the will to power or to self-overcoming that is the fundamental engine of all life. The operating mechanism of such a will consists in prompting the living to undergo transformations or transitory deaths, after which this fundamental engine (...)
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  32. Żelazna (1984). The "Essential Thought" of Martin Heidegger as a Continuation of Nietzsche's Philosophy of Time. Studia Filozoficzne 218 (1):69-84.
    This article is a summation of work devoted to the main themes of Heidegger's and Nietzsche's philosophies. Heidegger's interpretation of Nietzscheanism and his evaluation of it prompt one make a more precise analysis of the relationship which hypothetically should exist between the "essential thought" of the two philosophers. A comparative analysis of the "essential" themes of the two philosophers shows, however, that questions which were undoubtedly most essential for Nietzsche are compeltely outside the area definied in Heidegger's philosophy as "essential (...)
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  33. Jolanta Żelazna (2001). Narodziny nihilizmu - epoka mitu, epoka prawdy. Toruński Przegląd Filozoficzny 3:57-81.
    The Birth of Nihilism - the Era of Myth, the Era of Thruth The paper reverts to the trend of Nietzsche's philosophy which at present is often quoted to justify the thesis of the Nietzschean source of post-modernity was to be a theoretical basis of the critics of "passive" nihilism by the author of "The Dawn of Day". Nietzsche contrasts the antique Greek vision of the world with the European outlook, re-intereprets the assumptions constituting the foundations of the European rationalism (...)
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