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Nietzsche: Character and Virtue Ethics
  1. Ruth Abbey (1999). Circles, Ladders and Stars: Nietzsche on Friendship. Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 2 (4):50-73.
    One of the major purposes of this article is to show that friendship was one of Nietzsche's central concerns and that he shared Aristotle's belief that it takes higher and lower forms. Yet Nietzsche's interest in friendship is overlooked in much of the secondary literature. An important reason for this is that this interest is most evident in the works of his middle period, and these tend to be neglected in commentaries on Nietzsche. In the works of the middle period, (...)
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  2. Ruth Abbey (1999). The Roots of Ressentiment. New Nietzsche Studies 3 (3-4):47-61.
    Despite its centrality for an understanding of Nietzsche's thought, the term ressentiment does not appear in his writings before Beyond Good and Evil. This article argues that the roots of the idea of ressentiment appear in his middle period writings when he discusses vanity [die Eitelkeit].
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  3. Mark Alfano (forthcoming). A Schooling in Contempt: Emotions and the Pathos of Distance. In Paul Katsafanas (ed.), Routledge Philosophy Minds: Nietzsche. Routledge
    Nietzsche scholars have developed an interest in his use of “thick” moral psychological concepts such as virtues and emotions. This development coincides with a renewed interest among both philosophers and social scientists in virtues, the emotions, and moral psychology more generally. Contemporary work in empirical moral psychology posits contempt and disgust as both basic emotions and moral foundations of normative codes. While virtues can be individuated in various ways, one attractive principle of individuation is to index them to characteristic emotions (...)
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  4. Mark Alfano (forthcoming). Genealogy Revisited. [REVIEW] Journal of Moral Philosophy.
    “Another Nietzsche’s On the Genealogy of Morality?” one might be excused for asking at the sight of Simon May’s new collection. This volume has to contend for shelf space with homonymic monographs by Lawrence Hatab (2008) and David Owen (2007), as well as Daniel Conway’s (2008) Nietzsche’s On the Genealogy of Morals, a compilation of the same name edited by Christa Acampora (2006), and Brian Leiter’s Nietzsche on Morality (2002). Add to this that Hatab contributes to May’s collection, Owen and (...)
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  5. Mark Alfano (forthcoming). How One Becomes What One Is: The Case for a Nietzschean Conception of Character Development. In Iskra Fileva (ed.), Perspectives on Character. Oxford
  6. Mark Alfano (2016). Swanton, Christine. The Virtue Ethics of Hume & Nietzsche. [REVIEW] Ethics 126 (4):1120-1124.
    This book has a noble aim: to free virtue ethics from the grip of the neo-Aristotelianism that limits its scope in contemporary Anglophone philosophy. Just as there are deontological views that are not Kant’s or even Kantian, just as there are consequentialist views that are not Bentham’s or even utilitarian, so, Swanton contends, there are viable virtue ethical views that are not Aristotle’s or even Aristotelian. Indeed, the history of both Eastern and Western philosophy suggests that the majority of normative (...)
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  7. Mark Alfano (2013). The Most Agreeable of All Vices: Nietzsche as Virtue Epistemologist. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 21 (4):767-790.
    It’s been argued with some justice by commentators from Walter Kaufmann to Thomas Hurka that Nietzsche’s positive ethical position is best understood as a variety of virtue theory – in particular, as a brand of perfectionism. For Nietzsche, value flows from character. Less attention has been paid, however, to the details of the virtues he identifies for himself and his type. This neglect, along with Nietzsche’s frequent irony and non-standard usage, has obscured the fact that almost all the virtues he (...)
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  8. Keith Ansell-Pearson (ed.) (2006). A Companion to Nietzsche. Blackwell Pub..
  9. Keith Ansell-Pearson (2005). Nietzsche's Critiques: The Kantian Foundations of His Thought (Review). Journal of Nietzsche Studies 29 (1):54-71.
  10. Keith Ansell-Pearson (1994). An Introduction to Nietzsche as Political Thinker: The Perfect Nihilist. Cambridge University Press.
    This is a lively and engaging introduction to the contentious topic of Nietzsche's political thought. It traces the development of Nietzsche's thinking on politics from his earliest writings to the mature work in which he advocates aristocratic radicalism as opposed to 'petty' European nationalism. The key ideas of the will to power, eternal return and the overman are discussed and all Nietzsche's major works analysed in detail, such as Beyond Good and Evil and The Genealogy of Morals, within the context (...)
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  11. Rebecca Bamford (2007). The Virtue of Shame: Defending Nietzsche’s Critique of Mitleid. In Gudrun von Tevenar (ed.), Nietzsche and Ethics. Peter Lang Verlag
    I argue that moral intuitions about Nietzsche as an exemplar of practical cruelty can be overturned. My argument is based upon the possibility of abandoning the notion of pure and unmediated passivity as intrinsic to the phenomena of human suffering and of Mitleid, as identified by Nietzsche. I claim that wrongly identifying intrinsic passivity in the phenomenology of Mitleid and of suffering generates the moral sceptical intuition. Once this case of mistaken identity is uncovered, 1 suggest, there is no reason (...)
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  12. Gottfried Benn (2000). Nietzsche After 50 Years (1950). New Nietzsche Studies 4 (3-4):127-137.
  13. Sandrine Berges (2001). Plato, Nietzsche, and Sublimation. Phronimon 3 (1):1-21.
    In this paper I aim to refute the claim that Plato and Nietzsche are at opposite poles regarding the treatment of the non-rational elements of the soul, and argue that, instead, they share a complex and psychologically rich view of the role of reason towards the appetites and the emotions. My argument makes use of the Freudian distinction between sublimation, i.e. the re-channelling of certain undesirable appetitive and emotional forces towards more beneficial ends, and repression. I show that both Plato (...)
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  14. Lorenzo Greco (2015). Christine Swanton, The Virtue Ethics of Hume and Nietzsche (Chichester: Wiley-Blackwell, 2015). [REVIEW] Rivista di Filosofia 107 (1):173-74.
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  15. Daniel I. Harris (2015). Nietzsche and Virtue. Journal of Value Inquiry 49 (3):325-328.
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  16. Grace Hunt (2013). Redeeming Resentment: Nietzsche's Affirmative Riposts. American Dialectic (No. 2/3).
  17. David McPherson (2016). Nietzsche, Cosmodicy, and the Saintly Ideal. Philosophy 91 (1):39-67.
    In this essay I examine Nietzsche’s shifting understanding of the saintly ideal with an aim to bringing out its philosophical importance, particularly with respect to what I call the problem of ‘cosmodicy’, i.e., the problem of justifying life in the world as worthwhile in light of the prevalent reality of suffering. In his early account Nietzsche understood the saint as embodying the supreme achievement of a self-transcending ‘feeling of oneness and identity with all living things’, while in his later account (...)
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  18. Talia Welsh (2014). Philosophy as Self-Transformation: Shusterman's Somaesthetics and Dependent Bodies. Journal of Speculative Philosophy 28 (4):489-504.
    Part of Nietzsche’s blistering attack against Western morality is the argument that it stems from a lack of self-control that the weak have. Since the moralist cannot control and direct his own sexuality, he creates a “universal” set of moral values to be imposed externally on everyone. Despite the enchanting diversity of life, moralists prefer drab worlds of absolutes to help bolster their weak-willed selves: “Let us finally consider how naïve it is altogether to say: ‘Man ought to be such (...)
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Nietzsche: Ethical Egoism
  1. Paul-Laurent Assoun (2000). Freud and Nietzsche. Distributed in the U.S. By Transaction Publishers.
    Many of the leading Freudian analysts, including in the early days, Jung, Adler, Reich and Rank, attempted to link the writings of Nietzsche with the clinical ...
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  2. Raymond Aaron Younis (1992). Schopenhauer Nietzsche and Yeats on 'Passing By'. English Language Notes 30 (2):50-57.
Nietzsche: Moral Psychology
  1. Ruth Abbey (1999). Circles, Ladders and Stars: Nietzsche on Friendship. Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 2 (4):50-73.
    One of the major purposes of this article is to show that friendship was one of Nietzsche's central concerns and that he shared Aristotle's belief that it takes higher and lower forms. Yet Nietzsche's interest in friendship is overlooked in much of the secondary literature. An important reason for this is that this interest is most evident in the works of his middle period, and these tend to be neglected in commentaries on Nietzsche. In the works of the middle period, (...)
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  2. Mark Alfano (forthcoming). A Schooling in Contempt: Emotions and the Pathos of Distance. In Paul Katsafanas (ed.), Routledge Philosophy Minds: Nietzsche. Routledge
    Nietzsche scholars have developed an interest in his use of “thick” moral psychological concepts such as virtues and emotions. This development coincides with a renewed interest among both philosophers and social scientists in virtues, the emotions, and moral psychology more generally. Contemporary work in empirical moral psychology posits contempt and disgust as both basic emotions and moral foundations of normative codes. While virtues can be individuated in various ways, one attractive principle of individuation is to index them to characteristic emotions (...)
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  3. Mark Alfano (forthcoming). Genealogy Revisited. [REVIEW] Journal of Moral Philosophy.
    “Another Nietzsche’s On the Genealogy of Morality?” one might be excused for asking at the sight of Simon May’s new collection. This volume has to contend for shelf space with homonymic monographs by Lawrence Hatab (2008) and David Owen (2007), as well as Daniel Conway’s (2008) Nietzsche’s On the Genealogy of Morals, a compilation of the same name edited by Christa Acampora (2006), and Brian Leiter’s Nietzsche on Morality (2002). Add to this that Hatab contributes to May’s collection, Owen and (...)
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  4. Mark Alfano (forthcoming). How One Becomes What One Is: The Case for a Nietzschean Conception of Character Development. In Iskra Fileva (ed.), Perspectives on Character. Oxford
  5. Mark Alfano (forthcoming). Nietzsche's Socio-Moral Psychology. Cambridge University Press.
  6. Mark Alfano (2016). Swanton, Christine. The Virtue Ethics of Hume & Nietzsche. [REVIEW] Ethics 126 (4):1120-1124.
    This book has a noble aim: to free virtue ethics from the grip of the neo-Aristotelianism that limits its scope in contemporary Anglophone philosophy. Just as there are deontological views that are not Kant’s or even Kantian, just as there are consequentialist views that are not Bentham’s or even utilitarian, so, Swanton contends, there are viable virtue ethical views that are not Aristotle’s or even Aristotelian. Indeed, the history of both Eastern and Western philosophy suggests that the majority of normative (...)
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  7. Mark Alfano (2015). How One Becomes What One is Called: On the Relation Between Traits and Trait-Terms in Nietzsche. Journal of Nietzsche Studies 46 (1):261-269.
    Despite the recent surge of interest in Nietzsche’s moral psychology and his conceptions of character and virtue in particular, little attention has been paid to his treatment of the relation between character traits and the terms that designate them. In this paper, I argue for an interpretation of this relation: Nietzsche thinks there is a looping effect between the psychological disposition named by a character trait-term and the practice of using that term.
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  8. Mark Alfano (2013). The Most Agreeable of All Vices: Nietzsche as Virtue Epistemologist. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 21 (4):767-790.
    It’s been argued with some justice by commentators from Walter Kaufmann to Thomas Hurka that Nietzsche’s positive ethical position is best understood as a variety of virtue theory – in particular, as a brand of perfectionism. For Nietzsche, value flows from character. Less attention has been paid, however, to the details of the virtues he identifies for himself and his type. This neglect, along with Nietzsche’s frequent irony and non-standard usage, has obscured the fact that almost all the virtues he (...)
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  9. Tom Bailey (2003). Nietzsche's Conscience: Six Character Studies From the Genealogy. [REVIEW] New Nietzsche Studies 5 (3/4/1/2):213-215.
  10. Rebecca Bamford (2014). Mood and Aphorism in Nietzsche’s Campaign Against Morality. Pli: The Warwick Journal of Philosophy 25 (55-76).
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  11. Gottfried Benn (2000). Nietzsche After 50 Years (1950). New Nietzsche Studies 4 (3-4):127-137.
  12. Jane Bennett & William E. Connolly (2002). Contesting Nature/Culture: The Creative Character of Thinking. Journal of Nietzsche Studies 24 (1):148-163.
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  13. Sandrine Berges (2001). Plato, Nietzsche, and Sublimation. Phronimon 3 (1):1-21.
    In this paper I aim to refute the claim that Plato and Nietzsche are at opposite poles regarding the treatment of the non-rational elements of the soul, and argue that, instead, they share a complex and psychologically rich view of the role of reason towards the appetites and the emotions. My argument makes use of the Freudian distinction between sublimation, i.e. the re-channelling of certain undesirable appetitive and emotional forces towards more beneficial ends, and repression. I show that both Plato (...)
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  14. Grace Hunt (2013). Redeeming Resentment: Nietzsche's Affirmative Riposts. American Dialectic (No. 2/3).
  15. Brian Leiter & Neil Sinhababu (eds.) (2007). Nietzsche and Morality. Oxford University Press.
    This volume capitalizes on a growth of interest in Nietzsche's work on morality from two sides -- from scholars of the history of philosophy and from ...
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  16. Luke Phillips (2015). Sublimation and the Übermensch. Journal of Nietzsche Studies 46 (3):349-366.
    Sublimation is a tricky idea. How does the desire for one thing, such as sexual intercourse, find satisfaction in the attainment of something else, such as writing love poetry? If it is truly a desire for sexual intercourse, then it should be satisfied only when it achieves its object. Unless, that is, it can be satisfied by something that sufficiently resembles sex, an analogue or proxy of sex. But writing love poetry does not seem to resemble sexual intercourse enough that (...)
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  17. A. Shanks (1997). Bonhoeffer's Responseto Nietzsche. Studies in Christian Ethics 10 (2):79-85.
  18. Joseph Swenson (2014). Sublimation and Affirmation in Nietzsche's Psychology. Journal of Nietzsche Studies 45 (2):196-209.
    Nietzsche informs his readers frequently and seemingly with great confidence that his most original contributions to philosophy are best understood in the context of his development of a radically new kind of psychology. In his most enthusiastic moments, he even suggests that the originality of his thinking reveals not just a very, very good psychologist at work in his writing but also something more like the invention or inauguration of the field of psychology itself. It is this inaugural sense of (...)
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  19. Gabriel Zamosc (2014). Review of Christa Davis Acampora's "Contesting Nietzsche". [REVIEW] Revista de Filosofía de la Universidad de Costa Rica 53 (135):129-135.
Nietzsche: Normative Ethics, Misc
  1. Ralph R. Acampora (1994). Using and Abusing Nietzsche for Environmental Ethics. Environmental Ethics 16 (2):187-194.
    Max Hallman has put forward an interpretation of Nietzsche’s philosophy according to which Nietzsche is a prototypical deep ecologist. In reply, I dispute Hallman’s main interpretive claim as well as its ethical and exegetical corollaries. I hold that Nietzsche is not a “biospheric egalitarian,” but rather an aristocratically individualistic “high humanist.” A consistently naturalistic transcendentalist, Nietzsche does submit a critique of modernity’s Christian-inflected anthropocentrism (pace Hallman), and yet—in his later work—he endorses exploitation in the quest for nobility (contra Hallman). I (...)
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  2. Steven G. Affeldt (2004). Review of David Mikics, The Romance of Individualism in Emerson and Nietzsche. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2004 (9).
    All students of Nietzsche know of his profound admiration for Emerson’s writing. However, as Stanley Cavell has observed, this knowledge has mostly been repressed or ineffective; which is to say that the extent, depth, and specificity of Emerson’s influence upon Nietzsche has remained largely unacknowledged and unassessed. In the course of the past decade or so, owing in large part to the influence of Cavell’s own work on Emerson (and Nietzsche), this situation has begun to change. Emerson’s work has increasingly (...)
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  3. John E. Atwell (1990). Reading Nietzsche. Teaching Philosophy 13 (2):177-180.
  4. Stephen Darwall (1998). Philosophical Ethics. Westview Press.
    Why is ethics part of philosophy? Stephen Darwall's Philosophical Ethics introduces students to ethics from a distinctively philosophical perspective, one that weaves together central ethical questions such as "What has value?" and "What are our moral obligations?" with fundamental philosophical issues such as "What is value?" and "What can a moral obligation consist in?"With one eye on contemporary discussions and another on classical texts,Philosophical Ethics shows how Hobbes, Mill, Kant, Aristotle, and Nietzsche all did ethical philosophy how, for example, they (...)
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  5. Andreas Dorschel (1988). Moralkritik und Kritikverbot: Das naturalistische Fundierungsargument bei Nietzsche. Tijdschrift Voor Filosofie 50 (3):508 - 524.
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  6. Aaron Harper (2015). Nietzsche's Thumbscrew: Honesty as Virtue and Value Standard. Journal of Nietzsche Studies 46 (3):367-390.
    Much has been made of the apparent tensions in Nietzsche’s ethical and metaethical views. In this essay I examine a kind of value standard available to Nietzsche that is present in his work. I offer an interpretation of honesty as both a Nietzschean virtue and a means of ethical assessment. Despite Nietzsche’s well-known criticisms of truth, he upholds honesty as the only remaining virtue of his free spirits. Honesty has been treated in the literature primarily in the contexts of truth (...)
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  7. Daniel Harris (2012). Nietzsche's Social Account of Responsibility. Southwest Philosophy Review 28 (1):103-110.
  8. Daniel I. Harris (2015). Friendship as Shared Joy in Nietzsche. Symposium: The Canadian Journal of Continental Philosophy 19 (1):199-221.
    Nietzsche criticizes the shared suffering of compassion as a basis for ethics, yet his challenge to overcome compassion seeks not to extinguish all fellow feeling but instead urges us to transform the way we relate to others, to learn to share not suffering but joy. For Schopenhauer, we act morally when we respond to another’s suffering, while we are mistrustful of the joys of others. Nietzsche turns to the type of relationality exempli!ied by friendship, understood as shared joy, in order (...)
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  9. David McPherson (2016). Nietzsche, Cosmodicy, and the Saintly Ideal. Philosophy 91 (1):39-67.
    In this essay I examine Nietzsche’s shifting understanding of the saintly ideal with an aim to bringing out its philosophical importance, particularly with respect to what I call the problem of ‘cosmodicy’, i.e., the problem of justifying life in the world as worthwhile in light of the prevalent reality of suffering. In his early account Nietzsche understood the saint as embodying the supreme achievement of a self-transcending ‘feeling of oneness and identity with all living things’, while in his later account (...)
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  10. Simon Robertson (2012). The Scope Problem - Nietzsche, the Moral, Ethical and Quasi-Aesthetic. In Janaway & Robertson (ed.), Nietzsche, Naturalism & Normativity.
  11. Simon Robertson & David Owen, Influence on Analytic Philosophy.
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