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  1. R. Abbey, F. Appel & Me Warren (1999). Domesticating Nietzsche. Author's Reply. Political Theory 27 (1):121-130.
  2. Ruth Abbey (1999). The Roots of Ressentiment. New Nietzsche Studies 3 (3-4):47-61.
    Despite its centrality for an understanding of Nietzsche's thought, the term ressentiment does not appear in his writings before Beyond Good and Evil. This article argues that the roots of the idea of ressentiment appear in his middle period writings when he discusses vanity [die Eitelkeit].
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  3. Ruth Abbey & Fredrick Appel (1999). Domesticating Nietzsche: A Response to Mark Warren. Political Theory 27 (1):121-125.
  4. Mathew Abbott (2011). The Animal for Which Animality is an Issue: Nietzsche, Agamben, and the Anthropological Machine. Angelaki 16 (4):87 - 99.
    Angelaki, Volume 16, Issue 4, Page 87-99, December 2011.
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  5. Christa Davis Acampora (2002/2013). Contesting Nietzsche. Journal of Nietzsche Studies 24 (1):1-4.
    Agon as analytic, diagnostic, and antidote -- Contesting Homer: the poiesis of value -- Contesting Socrates: Nietzsche's (artful) naturalism -- Contesting Paul: toward an ethos of agonism -- Contesting Wagner: how one becomes what one is.
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  6. Christa Davis Acampora (2002). Nietzsche Contra Homer, Socrates, and Paul. Journal of Nietzsche Studies 24 (1):25-53.
  7. Linda Alcoff (2004). Schutte's Nietzschean Postcolonial Politics. Hypatia 19 (3):144-156.
    : Much of Ofelia Schutte's work has been focused on the question of liberation, especially for women and for colonized peoples. In this paper I discuss some of the important contributions she has made toward understanding the difficulty of dialogue across differences of culture and power, and toward thinking through the relationships of culture, identity, and social justice. Although I generally agree with Schutte's positions, I try here to initiate a dialogue about some conflicting tendencies I see in her positions. (...)
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  8. Mark Alfano (forthcoming). How One Becomes What One is Called: On the Relation Between Traits and Trait-Terms in Nietzsche. Journal of Nietzsche Studies.
    Despite the recent surge of interest in Nietzsche’s moral psychology and his conceptions of character and virtue in particular, little attention has been paid to his treatment of the relation between character traits and the terms that designate them. In this paper, I argue for an interpretation of this relation: Nietzsche thinks there is a looping effect between the psychological disposition named by a character trait-term and the practice of using that term.
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  9. David B. Allison (2000). Notes on David Krell's The Good European. New Nietzsche Studies 4 (1-2):201-212.
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  10. Charles Andler (2009). Nietzsche's Social Views (1876–82). Philosophical Forum 40 (2):287-304.
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  11. Edward Andrew (1975). A Note on the Unity of Theory and Practice in Marx and Nietzsche. Political Theory 3 (3):305-316.
  12. Keith Ansell-Pearson (2010). Nietzsche's Animal Philosophy: Culture, Politics, and the Animality of the Human Being (Review). Journal of Nietzsche Studies 40:82-84.
  13. Keith Ansell-Pearson (1994). An Introduction to Nietzsche as Political Thinker: The Perfect Nihilist. Cambridge University Press.
    This is a lively and engaging introduction to the contentious topic of Nietzsche's political thought. It traces the development of Nietzsche's thinking on politics from his earliest writings to the mature work in which he advocates aristocratic radicalism as opposed to 'petty' European nationalism. The key ideas of the will to power, eternal return and the overman are discussed and all Nietzsche's major works analysed in detail, such as Beyond Good and Evil and The Genealogy of Morals, within the context (...)
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  14. Keith Ansell-Pearson (1991). Nietzsche Contra Rousseau: A Study of Nietzsche's Moral and Political Thought. Cambridge University Press.
    Keith Ansell-Pearson's book is an important and very welcome contribution to a neglected area of research: Nietzsche's political thought. Nietzsche is widely regarded as a significant moral philosopher, but his political thinking has often been dismissed as either impossibly individualistic or dangerously totalitarian. Nietzsche contra Rousseau takes a serious look at Nietzsche as political thinker and relates his political ideas to the dominant traditions of modern political thought. In particular, the nature of Nietzsche's dialogue with the philosophy of Jean-Jacques Rousseau (...)
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  15. Keith J. Ansell-Pearson (1986). The Exoteric Philosophy of Friedrich Nietzsche. Political Theory 14 (3):497-504.
  16. Fredrick Appel (1999). Nietzsche Contra Democracy. Cornell University Press.
    Apolitical, amoral, an aesthete whose writings point toward some form of liberation: this is the figure who emerges from most recent scholarship on Friedrich ...
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  17. Sabine Appel (2011). Friedrich Nietzsche: Wanderer Und Freier Geist. C.H. Beck.
  18. Ciano Aydin (2007). Nietzsche on Reality as Will to Power: Toward an "Organization–Struggle" Model. Journal of Nietzsche Studies 33 (1):25-48.
  19. Rebecca Bamford (forthcoming). The Liberatory Limits of Nietzsche’s Colonial Imagination in Dawn §206. In Barry Stocker & Manuel Knoll (eds.), NIetzsche as Political Philosopher. De Gruyter.
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  20. Nandita Biswas Mellamphy (2011). The Three Stigmata of Friedrich Nietzsche: Political Physiology in the Age of Nihilism. Palgrave Macmillan.
  21. Pietro Gori (2012). Small Moments and Individual Taste. In Volker Caysa & Konstanze Schwarzwald (eds.), Nietzsche - macht - größe. Nietzsche - philosoph der größe der macht oder der macht der größe? deGruyter.
    In a note from 1881 (KSA 9, 11 [156]) Nietzsche talks about the “infinitely small moment” as “the highest reality and truth” for the individual who tries to contrast the “uniformity of sensations” and to affirm his “idiosyncratic taste”. In doing so, he gives to the briefest of moments a leading role, since one can see it as the reference point of a dialectic between man and society. In fact, the single moment reveals the unavoidable becoming even of human taste, (...)
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  22. Donovan Miyasaki, (2014) Capitalism and its Contentments: A Nietzschean Critique of Ideology Critique.
    Nietzsche’s psychological theory of the drives calls into question two common assumptions of ideology critique: 1) that ideology is fetishistic, substituting false satisfactions for true ones, and 2) that ideology is falsification; it conceals exploitation. In contrast, a Nietzschean approach begins from the truth of ideology: that capitalism produces an authentic contentment that makes the concealment of exploitation unnecessary. And it critiques ideology from the same standpoint: capitalism produces pleasures too efficiently, an overproduction of desire that is impossible to sustain (...)
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  23. Alan D. Schrift (1999). Nietzsche For Democracy. Southern Journal of Philosophy 37 (Supplement):167-173.
  24. Alan D. Schrift (1998). Why We Are Not Nietzscheans. New Nietzsche Studies 2 (3-4):112-116.
  25. Bradford Vivian (2007). Freedom, Naming, Nobility: The Convergence of Rhetorical and Political Theory in Nietzsche's Philosophy. Philosophy and Rhetoric 40 (4):372 - 393.