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  1. Vinod Acharya (2015). Science, Culture and Philosophy: The Relation Between Human, All Too Human and Nietzsche's Early Thought. Comparative and Continental Philosophy 7 (1):18-28.
    The goal of this article is to trace the transformations in Nietzsche’s early thinking that led to the ideas published in Human, All Too Human, the first book of his mature philosophy. In contrast to his early works, in which he sides with art and philosophy in criticizing the scientific culture of his time, Nietzsche, in Human, All Too Human, hails the methodology of science as a way to overcome the metaphysical (...)
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  2. D. C. B. (1961). Review of Engel, The Problem of Tragedy. [REVIEW] Review of Metaphysics 14 (4):723-723.
  3. Johannes Balthasar (1990). Metaphysics, Art and Language in Early Works of Nietzsche. Philosophy and History 23 (2):116-116.
  4. John Carvalho (2003). Dance of Dionysus. International Studies in Philosophy 35 (3):101-116.
  5. Andreas Dorschel (2015). In den Strudeln der Einbildungskraft. Philosophische Imagination bei Fichte, Schiller und Nietzsche. In Matthias Schmidt & Arne Stollberg (eds.), Das Bildliche und das Unbildliche. Nietzsche, Wagner und das Musikdrama. Wilhelm Fink 29-41.
    “How does music stand to image and concept?” (KSA 1, 104) This query in the aesthetics of media is central to Nietzsche’s Birth of Tragedy and related early texts; it shapes both their form and content. Nietzsche searches for a mode of non-conceptual philosophizing; he wishes to organize thought as a sequence of suggestive images – thoughts, that is, about that very relationship. Nietzsche’s success or failure in that endeavour becomes clearer against the foil of the 1795 controversy between Friedrich (...)
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  6. Andreas Dorschel (1987). Die Idee der ‘Einswerdung’ in Wagners Tristan. In Heinz-Klaus Metzger & Rainer Riehn (eds.), Richard Wagner, Tristan und Isolde. Edition Text + Kritik 19-25.
  7. Friedrich Nietzsche, Die Geburt der Tragödie (German).
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  8. M. S. Silk & J. P. Stern (1981). Nietzsche on Tragedy. Cambridge University Press.
    This is the first comprehensive study of Nietzsche's earliest (and extraordinary) book, The Birth of Tragedy (1872). When he wrote it, Nietzsche was a Greek scholar, a friend and champion of Wagner, and a philosopher in the making. His book has been very influential and widely read, but has always posed great difficulties for readers because of the particular way Nietzsche brings his ancient and modern interests together. The proper appreciation of such a work requires access to ideas that cross (...)
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  9. J. T. (1968). Review of The Birth of Tragedy and The Case of Wagner (Kaufmann, Tr.). [REVIEW] Review of Metaphysics 21 (3):558-558.
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