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  1. Bettina Bergo (2003). Evolution and Force: Anxiety in Kierkegaard and Nietzsche. Southern Journal of Philosophy 41 (2):143-168.
  2. Peter Bornedal (2006). Different Kinds of Ecstasy: Review of Three Recent Works on ‚Eternal Recurrence'. [REVIEW] Nietzsche-Studien 35 (1).
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  3. Peter Bornedal (2006). Eternal Recurrence in Inner-Mental-Life. Nietzsche-Studien 35 (1).
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  4. Donovan Miyasaki, (2014) Feeling, Not Freedom: Nietzsche Against Agency.
    Nietzsche’s rejection of metaphysical freedom of the will does not leave room for a morally substantial conception of freedom, particularly that of agency free will. His normative ideal of a higher, more valuable human type consists of the only kind of agency he believes to be possible: the mere feeling of freedom—the qualitative feeling alone, without deeper substance. Not only does the feeling of agency not imply any strong, morally significant freedom of agency, in practice it requires a limitation of (...)
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  5. Ariela Tubert (forthcoming). Nietzsche's Existentialist Freedom. Journal of Nietzsche Studies.
    Following Solomon’s Living with Nietzsche, I defend an interpretation of Nietzsche’s views about freedom that are in line with the existentialist notion of self-creation. Given Nietzsche’s emphasis on the limitations on human freedom, his critique of the notion of causa sui (self-creation out of nothing), and his critique of morality for relying on the assumption that we have free will, it may be surprising that he could be taken seriously as an existentialist – existentialism characteristically takes freedom and self-creation to (...)
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