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  1. Bettina Bergo (2003). Evolution and Force: Anxiety in Kierkegaard and Nietzsche. Southern Journal of Philosophy 41 (2):143-168.
  2. Peter Bornedal (2006). Different Kinds of Ecstasy: Review of Three Recent Works on ‚Eternal Recurrence'. [REVIEW] Nietzsche-Studien 35 (1):343-356.
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  3. Peter Bornedal (2006). Eternal Recurrence in Inner-Mental-Life. Nietzsche-Studien 35 (1):104-165.
    The essay introduces an interpretation of Nietzsche's Eternal-Recurrence-Thought distinct from traditional 'cosmological' as well as 'ethical' interpretations. The interpretation suggests that eternal recurrence is a conceptualization of intellectual and volitional processes. External recurrence is understood as a concept articulating peculiarities about mental processes related to knowledge and pleasure.Der Aufsatz stellt ein Interpretation von Nietzsches Gedanken der Ewigen Wiederkunft vor, die weder 'kosmologisch' noch 'ethisch' sein möchte. Diese Interpretation hält die Ewige Wiederkunft für eine Konzeptualisierung von Verstandes- und Willensakten. Der Begriff (...)
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  4. Michael Bourke (2015). Persons, Virtual Persons, and Radical Interpretation. Modern Horizons:1-24.
    A dramatic problem facing the concept of the self is whether there is anything to make sense of. Despite the speculative view that there is an essential role for the perceiver in measurement, a physicalist view of reality currently seems to be ruling out the conditions of subjectivity required to keep the concept of the self. Eliminative materialism states this position explicitly. The doctrine holds that we have no objective grounds for attributing personhood to anyone, and can therefore dispense with (...)
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  5. Pietro Gori (2015). Psychology Without a Soul, Philosophy Without an I: Nietzsche and 19th Century Psychophysics. In Bartholomew Ryan, Maria Joao Mayer Branco & João Constancio (eds.), Nietzsche and the Problem of Subjectivity. De Gruyter 166-195.
    Friedrich Nietzsche’s criticism towards the substance-concept „I“ plays an important role in his late thought, and can be properly understood by making reference to the 19th century debate on the scientific psychology. Friedrich Lange and Ernst Mach gave an important contribution to that debate. Both of them developed the ideas of Gustav Fechner, and thought about a „psychology without soul“, i.e. an investigation that gives up with the old metaphysics of substance in dealing with the mind-body problem. In this paper (...)
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  6. Pietro Gori & Paolo Stellino (2015). Introductory Study. Nietzsche on Culture and Subjectivity. Enrahonar: Quaderns de Filosofía 2 (1):11-23.
    Nietzsche’s timeliness is patent in the renewed enthusiasm with which scholars in both the continental and analytic traditions have approached his works in recent years. Along with other topics, attention has been particularly directed towards two important issues: Nietzsche’s analysis, critique, and genealogy of culture, and his stance on subjectivity. In this introductory study we shall provide a brief outline of both these topics. As will be shown, they play a pivotal role in Nietzsche’s thought, and the link that connects (...)
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  7. Donovan Miyasaki, Nietzsche's Incompatibilism.
  8. Donovan Miyasaki (2016). Feeling, Not Freedom: Nietzsche Against Agency. Journal of Nietzsche Studies 47 (2):256-274.
    Despite his rejection of the metaphysical conception of freedom of the will, Nietzsche frequently makes positive use of the language of freedom, autonomy, self-mastery, self-overcoming, and creativity when describing his normative project of enhancing humanity through the promotion of its highest types. A number of interpreters have been misled by such language to conclude that Nietzsche accepts some version of compatibilism, holding a theory of natural causality that excludes metaphysical or “libertarian” freedom of the will, while endorsing morally substantial alternative (...)
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  9. Marco Parmeggiani (1998). Nietzsche y la disolución del concepto de yo, en la obra publicada y en los fragmentos póstumos de 1876 a 1882. Contrastes: Revista Interdisciplinar de Filosofía 3:185-210.
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  10. Ariela Tubert (2015). Nietzsche's Existentialist Freedom. Journal of Nietzsche Studies 46 (3):409-424.
    Following Robert C. Solomon’s Living with Nietzsche, I defend an interpretation of Nietzsche’s views about freedom that are in line with the existentialist notion of self-creation. Given Nietzsche’s emphasis on the limitations on human freedom, his critique of the notion of causa sui (self-creation out of nothing), and his critique of morality for relying on the assumption that we have free will, it may be surprising that he could be taken seriously as an existentialist—existentialism characteristically takes freedom and self-creation to (...)
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  11. Gabriel Zamosc (forthcoming). Nietzschean Wholeness. In Paul Katsafanas (ed.), Routledge Philosophy Minds: Nietzsche. Routledge
  12. Gabriel Zamosc (2015). Life, Death, and Eternal Recurrence in Nietzsche's Zarathustra. The Agonist 8 (1&2).
    -/- This paper offers a preliminary interpretation of Nietzsche’s doctrine of Eternal Recurrence, according to which the doctrine constitutes a parable that, speaking of what is permanent in life, praises and justifies all that is impermanent. What is permanent, what always recurs, is the will to power or to self-overcoming that is the fundamental engine of all life. The operating mechanism of such a will consists in prompting the living to undergo transformations or transitory deaths, after which this fundamental engine (...)
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  13. Gabriel Zamosc (2015). What Zarathustra Whispers. Nietzsche-Studien 44 (1):231-266.
    Name der Zeitschrift: Nietzsche-Studien Jahrgang: 44 Heft: 1 Seiten: 231-266. -/- Abstract: In this essay I defend my interpretation of the unheard words that Zarathustra whispers into Life’s ear in “The Other Dance Song” and that have long kept commentators puzzled. I argue that what Zarathustra whispers is that he knows that Life is pregnant with his child. Zarathustra’s ability to make Life pregnant depends on his overcoming of Eternal Recurrence which threatens to strangle him with disgust of human beings (...)
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  14. Gabriel Zamosc (2014). Nietzsche's Ideal of Wholeness. Revista de Filosofía de la Universidad de Costa Rica 53 (137):9-31.
    Summary: In this paper I investigate Nietzsche’s ideal of wholeness or unity. The consensus among commentators is that this ideal consists in the achievement of psychic integration in a person whereby the various parts of the agent’s mind are restructured into a harmonious whole. Against this prevalent reading, I argue that Nietzschean wholeness concerns cultural integration: a person becomes whole by pursuing the ideal of freedom and humanity in himself and in all, an ideal that transcends national boundaries and that (...)
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