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  1. S. M. Amadae (2004). Nietzsche's Thirst For India. Idealistic Studies 34 (3):239-262.
    This essay represents a novel contribution to Nietzschean studies by combining an assessment of Friedrich Nietzsche’s challenging uses of “truth” and the “eternal return” with his insights drawn from Indian philosophies. Specifically, drawing on Martin Heidegger’s Nietzsche, I argue that Nietzsche’s critique of a static philosophy of being underpinning conceptual truth is best understood in line with the Theravada Buddhist critique of “self ” and “ego” as transitory. In conclusion, I find that Nietzsche’s “eternal return” can be understood as a (...)
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  2. Manuel Dries (2008). Nietzsche's Critique of Staticism. In M. Dries (ed.), Nietzsche on Time and History. Walter de Gruyter.
    Why are we still intrigued by Nietzsche? This chapter argues that sustained interest stems from Nietzsche’s challenge to what we might call the ‘staticism’ inherent in our ordinary experience. Staticism can be defined, roughly speaking, as the view that the world is a collection of enduring, re-identifiable objects that change only very gradually and according to determinate laws. The chapter discusses Nietzsche’s rejection of remnants of staticism in Hegel and Schopenhauer (1). It outlines why Nietzsche deems belief in any variant (...)
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  3. Wolfgang Müller-Lauter (1998). Nietzsche und Heidegger als nihilistische Denker. Nietzsche-Studien 27 (1).
  4. David Rowe (2012). The Eternal Return of the Same: Nietzsche's "Valueless" Revaluation of All Values. Parrhesia (15):71-86.
    In this paper I argue that Nietzsche should be understood as a “thorough-going nihilist”. Rather than broaching two general projects of destroying current values and constructing new ones, I argue that Nietzsche should be understood only as a destroyer of values. I do this by looking at Nietzsche’s views on nihilism and the role played by Nietzsche’s cyclical view of time, or his doctrine of the eternal recurrence of the same. I provide a typology of nihilisms, as they are found (...)
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  5. David Emmanuel Rowe (2013). Nietzsche's 'Anti-Naturalism'in 'The Four Great Errors'. International Journal of Philosophical Studies 21 (2):256 - 276.
    This paper is primarily a response to ?analytically-minded? philosophers, such as Maudemarie Clark and Brian Leiter, who push for a ?naturalistic? interpretation of Nietzsche. In particular, this paper will consider Leiter?s (2007) discussion of Nietzsche?s chapter in Twilight of the Idols, ?The Four Great Errors?, and argue that Leiter has misinterpreted this chapter in at least four ways. I provide a superior interpretation of this chapter, which argues that Nietzsche is using a transcendental style of argument to argue against a (...)
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  6. Christoph Schuringa (2011). Time and Becoming in Nietzsche's Thought. By Robin Small. London/New York: Continuum, 2010, Pp. 202. [REVIEW] Philosophy 86 (1):134-38.
    Nietzsche repeatedly portrays himself as an advocate of what he calls a ‘philosophy of becoming’. While in his early Untimely Meditations he had considered the ‘doctrine of sovereign becoming’ to be ‘true but deadly’, from the middle-period Human, All Too Human up to and including his last writings he urges us to embrace this doctrine wholeheartedly. He consistently links the view of the world as being in a state of constant flux with the teachings of Heraclitus, the one philosopher whom (...)
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