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  1. Panos D. Alexakos (1993). Nietzsche On Truth and Philosophy. International Philosophical Quarterly 33 (1):127-128.
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  2. Barry Allen (1992). Nietzsche's Question, "What Good Is Truth?". History of Philosophy Quarterly 9 (2):225 - 240.
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  3. R. Lanier Anderson (2005). Nietzsche on Truth, Illusion, and Redemption. European Journal of Philosophy 13 (2):185–225.
  4. R. Lanier Anderson (1998). Truth and Objectivity in Perspectivism. Synthese 115 (1):1-32.
    I investigate the consequences of Nietzsche's perspectivism for notions of truth and objectivity, and show how the metaphor of visual perspective motivates an epistemology that avoids self-referential difficulties. Perspectivism's claim that every view is only one view, applied to itself, is often supposed to preclude the perspectivist's ability to offer reasons for her epistemology. Nietzsche's arguments for perspectivism depend on “internal reasons”, which have force not only in their own perspective, but also within the standards of alternative perspectives. Internal reasons (...)
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  5. Keith Ansell-Pearson (2005). Nietzsche's Critiques: The Kantian Foundations of His Thought (Review). Journal of Nietzsche Studies 29 (1):54-71.
  6. Tom Bailey (2003). Nietzsche: His Philosophy of Contradictions and the Contradictions of His Philosophy (Review). Journal of Nietzsche Studies 25 (1):95-100.
  7. Ernst Behler (1991). Confrontations: Derrida/Heidegger/Nietzsche. Stanford University Press.
    Introduction Undoubtedly it would be useful to interpret the "new Nietzsche," as he is often called, within the larger contexts of "Nietzsche and the ...
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  8. Matthew Bennett (2008). Beyond the Veil: A Woman Named Truth and the Truth of Woman. Literature and Theology 22 (3).
    ‘Beyond the Veil’ seeks to understand the relation between truth and woman in Nietzsche's works. I will attempt this by asking two questions. First: how does Nietzsche establish an anthropomorphic feminine truth, and what is achieved by this metaphor? Second: what is Nietzsche's truth about woman? Through analysis of selected passages, I will argue that Nietzsche, through gendering truth, displays a conviction that what we believe to be true functions as such only when ‘veiled’; the metaphor of a veiled woman (...)
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  9. Frank Chouraqui, A Study in Ambiguity : Nietzsche and Merleau-Ponty on the Question of Truth.
    This thesis seeks to make a contribution to the history of modern continental philosophy by establishing a structural link between the thoughts of Friedrich Nietzsche and Maurice Merleau-Ponty. I argue that this link lies in the question of truth: both thinkers criticise the traditional concept of truth as objectivity. However, they both find in the existence of this very concept a problem that its rejection alone does not solve. What is it in our natural axistence that gave rise to the (...)
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  10. Maudemarie Clark (1990). Nietzsche on Truth and Philosophy. Cambridge University Press.
    Friedrich Nietzsche haunts the modern world. His elusive writings with their characteristic combination of trenchant analysis of the modern predicament and suggestive but ambiguous proposals for dealing with it have fascinated generations of artists, scholars, critics, philosophers, and ordinary readers. Maudemarie Clark's highly original study gives a lucid and penetrating analytical account of all the central topics of Nietzsche's epistemology and metaphysics, including his views on truth and language, his perspectivism, and his doctrines of the will-to-power and the eternal recurrence. (...)
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  11. Andrew Jason Cohen (1999). In Defense of Nietzschean Genealogy. Philosophical Forum 30 (4):269–288.
    Using Alasdair MacIntyre as a foil, I defend what I take to be a viable Nietzschean genealogical account, showing that a proper perspectivism is neither perniciously subjectivist nor absolutist. I begin by arguing against MacIntyre’s assertion that genealogists are committed to the view that rationality requires neutrality and that as there is no neutrality, there is no rationality. I then continue by offering something of a reconstruction of Nietzsche’s view, designed partly to clarify the error pinpointed in MacIntyre’s arguments, but (...)
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  12. Daniel W. Conway (1992). Nietzsche on Truth and Philosophy. Review of Metaphysics 46 (1):146-148.
  13. Christoph Cox (1996). Being and its Others: Nietzsche's Revaluation of Truth. [REVIEW] Man and World 29 (1):43-61.
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  14. Steven Galt Crowell (1987). Nietzsche's View of Truth. International Studies in Philosophy 19 (2):3-18.
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  15. Jeffrey Brian Downard (2004). Nietzsche and Kant on the Pure Impulse to Truth. Journal of Nietzsche Studies 27 (1):18-41.
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  16. Manuel Dries (2008). Nietzsche's Critique of Staticism. In M. Dries (ed.), Nietzsche on Time and History. Walter de Gruyter.
    Why are we still intrigued by Nietzsche? This chapter argues that sustained interest stems from Nietzsche’s challenge to what we might call the ‘staticism’ inherent in our ordinary experience. Staticism can be defined, roughly speaking, as the view that the world is a collection of enduring, re-identifiable objects that change only very gradually and according to determinate laws. The chapter discusses Nietzsche’s rejection of remnants of staticism in Hegel and Schopenhauer (1). It outlines why Nietzsche deems belief in any variant (...)
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  17. Giles Fraser (2002). Redeeming Nietzsche: On the Piety of Unbelief. Routledge.
    Best known for having declared the death of God, Nietzsche was a thinker thoroughly absorbed in the Christian tradition in which he was born and raised. Yet while the atheist Nietzsche is well known, the pious Nietzsche is seldom recognised and rarely understood. Redeeming Nietzsche examines the residual theologian in the most vociferous of atheists. Fraser demonstrates that although Nietzsche rejected God, he remained obsessed with the question of human salvation. Examining his accounts of art, truth, morality and eternity, Nietzsche's (...)
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  18. Ken Gemes, Strangers to Ourselves: Nietzsche on The Will to Truth, The Scientific Spirit, Free Will, and Genuine Selfhood.
    On the Genealogy of Morals contains the puzzling claim that the will to truth is the last expression of the ascetic ideal. Part I of this essay argues that Nietzsche’s claim is that our will to truth functions as a tool allowing us to take a passive stance to the world, leading us to repress and split off part of our nature. Part II deals with Nietzsche’s account of the sovereign individual and his related, novel, account of free will. Both (...)
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  19. Ken Gemes (1992). Nietzsche's Critique of Truth. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 52 (1):47-65.
    Article (Reprinted in "Oxford Readings in Philosophy: Nietzsche", edited by B. Leiter and J. Richardson, Oxford University Press, 2001.
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  20. Ullrich Haase (2009). Nietzsche on Truth and Justice. New Nietzsche Studies 8 (1-2):78-97.
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  21. Steven D. Hales & Rex Welshon (1994). Truth, Paradox, and Nietzschean Perspectivism. History of Philosophy Quarterly 11 (1):101-119.
    We argue that Nietzsche's interest in truth is more than merely a critical one. He criticizes one historically prominent conception of truth while proposing his own theory, called "perspectivism". However, Nietzsche's truth perspectivism appears to face a self-referential paradox, which is explored in detail. We argue that no commentator has yet solved this puzzle, and then provide our own solution. This solution, which depends upon distinguishing between weak and strong perspectivism while promoting the former, supplies Nietzsche with a consistent truth (...)
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  22. Peter Heckman (1991). Nietzsche's Clever Animal: Metaphor in "Truth and Falsity". Philosophy and Rhetoric 24 (4):301 - 321.
    In this essay I show how Nietzsche's use of metaphor in "Truth and Falsity in an Ultra-Moral Sense" helps make the general point of the essay itself. I argue that the essay both distinguishes between the human and the natural order and yet works to erase that distinction, just as it both posits and denies a difference between truth and lie, dream and reality. Given that Nietzsche's text is directed against the possibility of literal truth, I argue that by proposing (...)
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  23. Lawrence M. Hinman (1982). Nietzsche, Metaphor, and Truth. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 43 (2):179-199.
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  24. Philip Hugly (1987). Crowell on Nietzsche on Truth. International Studies in Philosophy 19 (2):19-28.
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  25. Andrea Hurst (2007). Supposing Truth is a Woman – What Then? South African Journal of Philosophy 26 (1):44-55.
    Nietzsche's analysis of the self-poisoning of ‘the will to power' and his insistence upon overcoming its ideological outcome (the dogmatist's fake ‘Truth') by recognizing the ‘un-truth' of a ‘logic of contamination,' demonstrates that he understands ‘truth' as a paradox. What may one accordingly expect in response to the question ‘Supposing truth is a woman – what then?', posed in the preface to Beyond Good and Evil (1966)? Supported by Derrida's Spurs: Nietzsche's Styles, I argue that Nietzsche could have drawn two (...)
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  26. Scott Jenkins (2012). Nietzsche's Questions Concerning the Will to Truth. Journal of the History of Philosophy 50 (2):265-289.
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  27. Mark E. Jonas & Yoshiaki M. Nakazawa (2008). Finding Truth in 'Lies': Nietzsche's Perspectivism and its Relation to Education. Journal of Philosophy of Education 42 (2):269-285.
    In his 2001 article 'Teaching to Lie and Obey: Nietzsche on Education', Stefan Ramaekers defends Nietzsche's concept of perspectivism against the charge that it is relativistic. He argues that perspectivism is not relativistic because it denies the dichotomy between the 'true' world and the 'seeming' world, a dichotomy central to claims to relativism. While Ramaekers' article is correct in denying relativistic interpretations of perspectivism it does not go far enough in this direction. In fact, the way Ramaekers makes his case (...)
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  28. Philip J. Kain (2006). Nietzsche, Truth, and the Horror of Existence. History of Philosophy Quarterly 23 (1):41 - 58.
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  29. Willard Mittelman (1984). Perspectivism, Becoming, and Truth in Nietzsche. International Studies in Philosophy 16 (2):3-22.
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  30. Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche (1989). Friedrich Nietzsche on Rhetoric and Language. Oxford University Press.
    Presenting the entire German text of Nietzsche's lectures on rhetoric and language and his notes for them, as well as facing page English translations, this book fills an important gap in the philosopher's corpus. Until now unavailable or existing only in fragmentary form, the lectures represent a major portion of Nietzsche's achievement. Included are an extensive editors' introduction on the background of Nietzsche's understanding of rhetoric, and critical notes identifying his sources and independent contributions.
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  31. Robert Nola (1987). Nietzsche's Theory of Truth and Belief. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 47 (4):525-562.
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  32. Kelly A. Oliver (1984). Woman as Truth in Nietzsche's Writing. Social Theory and Practice 10 (2):185-199.
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  33. Justin Remhof (forthcoming). On Nietzsche?S Conception of Truth: Correspondence, Coherence, or Pragmatist? Journal of Nietzsche Studies.
    Nearly every common theory of truth has been attributed to Nietzsche, while some commentators have argued that he simply has no theory of truth. This essay argues that Nietzsche?s remarks on truth are better situated within either the coherence or pragmatist theories of truth rather than the correspondence theory. Nietzsche?s thoughts conflict with the correspondence framework because he believes that the truth-conditions of propositions are constitutively related to our interests and that truth is approximate.
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  34. A. Ridley (2010). Perishing of the Truth: Nietzsche's Aesthetic Prophylactics. British Journal of Aesthetics 50 (4):427-437.
    This paper offers an interpretation of Nietzsche’s well known unpublished remark, ‘Truth is ugly. We possess art lest we perish of the truth .’ I argue that it is not helpful to construe this remark as a claim to the effect that art falsifies the truth by, for example, peddling lies or deceptions. Rather, I suggest, the remark should be taken to refer to the various ways in which art can present us with the truth in such a manner that (...)
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  35. David Rowe (2012). The Eternal Return of the Same: Nietzsche's "Valueless" Revaluation of All Values. Parrhesia (15):71-86.
    In this paper I argue that Nietzsche should be understood as a “thorough-going nihilist”. Rather than broaching two general projects of destroying current values and constructing new ones, I argue that Nietzsche should be understood only as a destroyer of values. I do this by looking at Nietzsche’s views on nihilism and the role played by Nietzsche’s cyclical view of time, or his doctrine of the eternal recurrence of the same. I provide a typology of nihilisms, as they are found (...)
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  36. Richard Schacht (1984). Nietzsche on Philosophy, Interpretation and Truth. Noûs 18 (1):75-85.
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  37. David Simpson (2007). Truth, Truthfulness and Philosophy in Plato and Nietzsche. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 15 (2):339 – 360.
    Even those aware of Nietzsches ambivalent (rather than purely negative) attitude to Plato, tend to accept Nietzsches account of Plato and himself as occupying the poles of philosophy. Much that Nietzsche says supports this view, but we need not take him at his word. I consider Nietzsche and Plato on three planes: their view of truth, their view of philosophy, and their use of certain emblematic figures (the New Philosopher, the Philosopher King) as the bearers of philosophys future. On these (...)
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  38. Stefan Lorenz Sorgner (2007). Metaphysics Without Truth: On the Importance of Consistency Within Nietzsche's Philosophy. Marquette University Press.
  39. Jacques Taminiaux (1987). Art and Truth in Schopenhauer and Nietzsche. Man and World 20 (1):85-102.
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  40. Alessandra Tanesini (1995). Nietzsche's Theory of Truth. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 73 (4):548 – 559.
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  41. Kenneth R. Westphal (1984). Was Nietzsche a Cognitivist? Journal of the History of Philosophy 22 (3):343-363.
    Does Nietzsche claim to know anything? Does he need to make such claims in order to fulfill his broader philosophical aims, in particular, to criticize religion and morality genealogically? Do his own epistemological views entitle him to make such claims? I defend affirmative answers to the first two of these questions and formulate several crucial issues involved in answering the third. These issues stem both from unresolved difficulties in available interpretations of Nietzsche and unexplored aspects of Nietzsche’s views. They include: (...)
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  42. Kenneth R. Westphal (1984). Nietzsche's Sting and the Possibility of Good Philology. International Studies in Philosophy 16 (2):71-90.
    I have argued elsewhere that Nietzsche’s genealogical critique of religion and morality requires a cognitivist epistemology, including a correspondence conception of truth. In this essay I pose ten crucial questions concerning the consistency of Nietzsche’s epistemology with his genealogy: Does Nietzsche hold that the world is a totally characterless flux? Does he hold that there is a metaphysical distinction between appearance and reality? Does he believe that there is cognitively useful perceptual access to the world? Does he believe that there (...)
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