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  1. Maurice Adams (1900). The Ethics of Tolstoy and Nietzsche. International Journal of Ethics 11 (1):82-105.
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Nietzsche: Overman
  1. David B. Allison (1990). A DIET OF WORMS. Aposiopetic Rhetoric in Beyond Good and Evil. Nietzsche-Studien 19 (1).
  2. Keith Ansell-Pearson (2006). The Eternal Return of the Overhuman: The Weightiest Knowledge and the Abyss of Light. Journal of Nietzsche Studies 30 (1):1-21.
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  3. Keith Ansell-Pearson (1997). Viroid Life: Perspectives on Nietzsche and the Transhuman Condition. Routledge.
    Exploring and critically examining the new realities of artificial life that confront us,Viroid Lifebrings together the tradition of Nietszchean thought with ...
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  4. Charles Bambach (2013). Nietzsche and Antiquity: His Reaction and Response to the Classical Tradition Ed. By Paul Bishop (Review). Journal of Nietzsche Studies 44 (1):113-115.
    The hermeneutic thicket surrounding the question of Nietzsche and the Greeks is both dense and forbidding. Every attempt to pose this question confronts a wide range of difficult issues. Who is “Nietzsche”? Which “Greeks”? What range of concerns? methods? disciplinary boundaries? How to think the relation between the early Nietzsche of the Basel years and the later Nietzsche post-Zarathustra? Where to turn for help in working through the palimpsest of interpretations that have formed the Nietzschebild in our time? To simply (...)
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Nietzsche: Nihilism
  1. Ruth Abbey (2004). Willing and Nothingness. [REVIEW] New Nietzsche Studies 5 (3-4):220-224.
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  2. Christa Davis Acampora (2009). The Affirmation of Life: Nietzsche on the Overcoming of Nihilism (Review). Journal of the History of Philosophy 47 (3):pp. 480-481.
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  3. Keith Ansell-Pearson (1997). Viroid Life: Perspectives on Nietzsche and the Transhuman Condition. Routledge.
    Exploring and critically examining the new realities of artificial life that confront us,Viroid Lifebrings together the tradition of Nietszchean thought with ...
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  4. Keith Ansell-Pearson (1994). An Introduction to Nietzsche as Political Thinker: The Perfect Nihilist. Cambridge University Press.
    This is a lively and engaging introduction to the contentious topic of Nietzsche's political thought. It traces the development of Nietzsche's thinking on politics from his earliest writings to the mature work in which he advocates aristocratic radicalism as opposed to 'petty' European nationalism. The key ideas of the will to power, eternal return and the overman are discussed and all Nietzsche's major works analysed in detail, such as Beyond Good and Evil and The Genealogy of Morals, within the context (...)
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  5. Piotr Augustyniak (2011). Bóg Mistrza Eckharta wobec Nietzscheańskiej krytyki chrześcijaństwa. ARGUMENT 1 (2):211-224.
    English title: Master Eckhart’s God Confronted with Nietzschean Critique of Christianity. Author tries to demonstrate that the way of thinking about Christian God developed in the late Middle Ages by Master Eckhart goes beyond the interpretation which underlies Nietzsche’s criticism of Christianity as a religion of the other world. In the paper, Author first presents the said criticism, followed by the vision of God outlined by Eckhart. He demonstrates that Christianity, criticized by Nietzsche, uses a commonsense vision of God’s transcendence (...)
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  6. Charles Bambach (2013). Nietzsche and Antiquity: His Reaction and Response to the Classical Tradition Ed. By Paul Bishop (Review). Journal of Nietzsche Studies 44 (1):113-115.
    The hermeneutic thicket surrounding the question of Nietzsche and the Greeks is both dense and forbidding. Every attempt to pose this question confronts a wide range of difficult issues. Who is “Nietzsche”? Which “Greeks”? What range of concerns? methods? disciplinary boundaries? How to think the relation between the early Nietzsche of the Basel years and the later Nietzsche post-Zarathustra? Where to turn for help in working through the palimpsest of interpretations that have formed the Nietzschebild in our time? To simply (...)
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  7. Charles Bambach (2003). Nietzsehe's Philosophy of the Etemal Recurrence of the Same. New Nietzsche Studies 5 (3/4/1/2):208-213.
  8. Georges Bataille (1992). On Nietzsche. Paragon House.
    I live — if I choose to see things this way- — among a curious race that sees earth, its chance events and the vast interconnectedness of animals, mammals, ...
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  9. Georges Bataille & tr Boone, Bruce (1995). Book Review: On Nietzsche. [REVIEW] Philosophy and Literature 19 (1).
  10. Ernst Behler (1991). Confrontations: Derrida/Heidegger/Nietzsche. Stanford University Press.
    Introduction Undoubtedly it would be useful to interpret the "new Nietzsche," as he is often called, within the larger contexts of "Nietzsche and the ...
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  11. Harold Bloom (ed.) (1987). Friedrich Nietzsche. Chelsea House Publishers.
  12. Martin Heidegger (1979/1991). Nietzsche. Harpersanfrancisco.
    A landmark discussion between two great thinkers, vital to an understanding of twentieth-century philosophy and intellectual history.
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  13. John Marmysz (2003). Laughing at Nothing: Humor as a Response to Nihilism. SUNY Press.
    Disputing the common misconception that nihilism is wholly negative and necessarily damaging to the human spirit, John Marmysz offers a clear and complete definition to argue that it is compatible, and indeed preferably responded to, with an attitude of good humor. He carefully scrutinizes the phenomenon of nihilism as it appears in the works, lives, and actions of key figures in the history of philosophy, literature, politics, and theology, including Nietzsche, Heidegger, Camus, and Mishima. While suggesting that there ultimately is (...)
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  14. John Marmysz (1996). From Night to Day: Nihilism and the Living Dead. Film and Philosophy 3:138-143.
    Upon its release in 1968, George Romero's Night of the Living Dead was attacked by many critics as an exploitative low budget film of questionable moral value. I argue in this paper that Night of the Living Dead is indeed nihilistic, but in a deeper philosophical sense than the critics had in mind.
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  15. John C. McCarthy (2000). Nihilism Before Nietzsche. Review of Metaphysics 54 (1):140-143.
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  16. Wolfgang Müller-Lauter (1998). Nietzsche und Heidegger als nihilistische Denker. Nietzsche-Studien 27 (1).
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  17. Ekaterina Poljakova (2006). Die „Bosheit“ der Russen. Nietzsche-Studien 35 (1).
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  18. Paul Prescott (2012). What Pessimism Is. Journal of Philosophical Research 37:337-356.
    On the standing view, pessimism is a philosophically intractable topic. Against the standing view, I hold that pessimism is a stance, or compound of attitudes, commitments and intentions. This stance is marked by certain beliefs—first and foremost, that the bad prevails over the good—which are subject to an important qualifying condition: they are always about outcomes and states of affairs in which one is personally invested. This serves to distinguish pessimism from other views with which it is routinely conflated— including (...)
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  19. Mariano L. Rodríguez González (1995). Historia y nihilismo. Apuntes para una confrontación Nietzsche-Ortega. Convivium 8:87.
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  20. David Rowe (2012). The Eternal Return of the Same: Nietzsche's "Valueless" Revaluation of All Values. Parrhesia (15):71-86.
    In this paper I argue that Nietzsche should be understood as a “thorough-going nihilist”. Rather than broaching two general projects of destroying current values and constructing new ones, I argue that Nietzsche should be understood only as a destroyer of values. I do this by looking at Nietzsche’s views on nihilism and the role played by Nietzsche’s cyclical view of time, or his doctrine of the eternal recurrence of the same. I provide a typology of nihilisms, as they are found (...)
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  21. Ashley Woodward (2009). Nihilism in Postmodernity. The Davies Group.
    Nihilism in Postmodernity is an exploration of the nature of the problem of meaninglessness in the contemporary world through the philosophical traditions of nihilism and postmodernism. The author traces the advent of modern nihilism in the works of Nietzsche, Sartre, and Heidegger, before detailing the postmodern transformation of nihilism in the works of three major postmodern thinkers: Lyotard, Baudrillard, and Vattimo. He presents a qualified defense of their positions, arguing that while there is much under-appreciated value in their responses to (...)
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Nietzsche: Value Theory, Miscellaneous
  1. Vinod Acharya (2012). Nobility and Decadence: The Vulnerabilities of Nietzsche's Strong Type. Phaenex 7 (1):130-161.
    This paper argues that for Nietzsche it is only when the strong type decays on its own terms that it is possible for a weak type to come into dominance by inverting the values of the strong. It sets right a latent inconsistency in Deleuze’s work, Nietzsche and Philosophy , which traces back the origin of decadence to the subterranean struggle between reactive forces. I show that Deleuze’s reading runs contrary to his own contention that for Nietzsche the negative is (...)
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  2. Mark Alfano (forthcoming). How One Becomes What One is Called: On the Relation Between Traits and Trait-Terms in Nietzsche. Journal of Nietzsche Studies.
    Despite the recent surge of interest in Nietzsche’s moral psychology and his conceptions of character and virtue in particular, little attention has been paid to his treatment of the relation between character traits and the terms that designate them. In this paper, I argue for an interpretation of this relation: Nietzsche thinks there is a looping effect between the psychological disposition named by a character trait-term and the practice of using that term.
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  3. R. Lanier Anderson (2005). Nietzsche on Truth, Illusion, and Redemption. European Journal of Philosophy 13 (2):185–225.
  4. Edward Andrew (1999). The Cost of Nietzschean Values. New Nietzsche Studies 3 (3-4):63-76.
  5. Edward Andrew (1975). A Note on the Unity of Theory and Practice in Marx and Nietzsche. Political Theory 3 (3):305-316.
  6. Keith Ansell-Pearson (2010). Nietzsche's Animal Philosophy: Culture, Politics, and the Animality of the Human Being (Review). Journal of Nietzsche Studies 40:82-84.
  7. Tom Bailey (2003). Nietzsche's Conscience: Six Character Studies From the Genealogy. [REVIEW] New Nietzsche Studies 5 (3/4/1/2):213-215.
  8. Andrew Jason Cohen (1999). In Defense of Nietzschean Genealogy. Philosophical Forum 30 (4):269–288.
    Using Alasdair MacIntyre as a foil, I defend what I take to be a viable Nietzschean genealogical account, showing that a proper perspectivism is neither perniciously subjectivist nor absolutist. I begin by arguing against MacIntyre’s assertion that genealogists are committed to the view that rationality requires neutrality and that as there is no neutrality, there is no rationality. I then continue by offering something of a reconstruction of Nietzsche’s view, designed partly to clarify the error pinpointed in MacIntyre’s arguments, but (...)
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  9. Donovan Miyasaki, (2014) Feeling, Not Freedom: Nietzsche Against Agency.
    Nietzsche’s rejection of metaphysical freedom of the will does not leave room for a morally substantial conception of freedom, particularly that of agency free will. His normative ideal of a higher, more valuable human type consists of the only kind of agency he believes to be possible: the mere feeling of freedom—the qualitative feeling alone, without deeper substance. Not only does the feeling of agency not imply any strong, morally significant freedom of agency, in practice it requires a limitation of (...)
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  10. Donovan Miyasaki (forthcoming). (2014) A Nietzschean Case for Egalitarianism. In Barry Stocker & Manuel Knoll (eds.), Nietzsche as Political Philosopher. Walter de Gruyter.
    This paper draws on Friedrich Nietzsche’s work to defend the (admittedly non-Nietzschean) conclusion that a non-liberal egalitarian society is superior in two ways: first, as a moral ideal, it does not rest on questionable claims about essential human equality and, second, such a society would provide the optimal psychological and political conditions for individual wellbeing, social stability, and cultural achievement. I first explain Nietzsche’s distinction between forms of egalitarianism: noble and slavish. The slavish form promotes equality, defined negatively as the (...)
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  11. Alan D. Schrift (1999). Nietzsche For Democracy. Southern Journal of Philosophy 37 (Supplement):167-173.
  12. Jolanta Żelazna (2006). Fascynacja, projekcja, resentyment a zagadnienie ocen moralnych. Uwagi dotyczące zjawiska resentymentu w ujęciu Schelera, Nietzschego i tzw. psychologii głębi. Ruch Filozoficzny 3 (3):437-457.