This category needs an editor. We encourage you to help if you are qualified.
Volunteer, or read more about what this involves.
Related categories
Siblings:
12 found
Search inside:
(import / add options)   Sort by:
  1. Vinod Acharya (2012). Nobility and Decadence: The Vulnerabilities of Nietzsche's Strong Type. Phaenex 7 (1):130-161.
    This paper argues that for Nietzsche it is only when the strong type decays on its own terms that it is possible for a weak type to come into dominance by inverting the values of the strong. It sets right a latent inconsistency in Deleuze’s work, Nietzsche and Philosophy , which traces back the origin of decadence to the subterranean struggle between reactive forces. I show that Deleuze’s reading runs contrary to his own contention that for Nietzsche the negative is (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (11 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Mark Alfano (forthcoming). How One Becomes What One is Called: On the Relation Between Traits and Trait-Terms in Nietzsche. Journal of Nietzsche Studies.
    Despite the recent surge of interest in Nietzsche’s moral psychology and his conceptions of character and virtue in particular, little attention has been paid to his treatment of the relation between character traits and the terms that designate them. In this paper, I argue for an interpretation of this relation: Nietzsche thinks there is a looping effect between the psychological disposition named by a character trait-term and the practice of using that term.
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. R. Lanier Anderson (2005). Nietzsche on Truth, Illusion, and Redemption. European Journal of Philosophy 13 (2):185–225.
  4. Edward Andrew (1999). The Cost of Nietzschean Values. New Nietzsche Studies 3 (3-4):63-76.
  5. Edward Andrew (1975). A Note on the Unity of Theory and Practice in Marx and Nietzsche. Political Theory 3 (3):305-316.
  6. Keith Ansell-Pearson (2010). Nietzsche's Animal Philosophy: Culture, Politics, and the Animality of the Human Being (Review). Journal of Nietzsche Studies 40:82-84.
  7. Tom Bailey (2003). Nietzsche's Conscience: Six Character Studies From the Genealogy. [REVIEW] New Nietzsche Studies 5 (3/4/1/2):213-215.
  8. Andrew Jason Cohen (1999). In Defense of Nietzschean Genealogy. Philosophical Forum 30 (4):269–288.
    Using Alasdair MacIntyre as a foil, I defend what I take to be a viable Nietzschean genealogical account, showing that a proper perspectivism is neither perniciously subjectivist nor absolutist. I begin by arguing against MacIntyre’s assertion that genealogists are committed to the view that rationality requires neutrality and that as there is no neutrality, there is no rationality. I then continue by offering something of a reconstruction of Nietzsche’s view, designed partly to clarify the error pinpointed in MacIntyre’s arguments, but (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Donovan Miyasaki, (2014) Feeling, Not Freedom: Nietzsche Against Agency.
    Nietzsche’s rejection of metaphysical freedom of the will does not leave room for a morally substantial conception of freedom, particularly that of agency free will. His normative ideal of a higher, more valuable human type consists of the only kind of agency he believes to be possible: the mere feeling of freedom—the qualitative feeling alone, without deeper substance. Not only does the feeling of agency not imply any strong, morally significant freedom of agency, in practice it requires a limitation of (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Donovan Miyasaki (forthcoming). (2014) A Nietzschean Case for Egalitarianism. In Barry Stocker & Manuel Knoll (eds.), Nietzsche as Political Philosopher. Walter de Gruyter.
    This paper draws on Friedrich Nietzsche’s work to defend the (admittedly non-Nietzschean) conclusion that a non-liberal egalitarian society is superior in two ways: first, as a moral ideal, it does not rest on questionable claims about essential human equality and, second, such a society would provide the optimal psychological and political conditions for individual wellbeing, social stability, and cultural achievement. I first explain Nietzsche’s distinction between forms of egalitarianism: noble and slavish. The slavish form promotes equality, defined negatively as the (...)
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Alan D. Schrift (1999). Nietzsche For Democracy. Southern Journal of Philosophy 37 (Supplement):167-173.
  12. Jolanta Żelazna (2006). Fascynacja, projekcja, resentyment a zagadnienie ocen moralnych. Uwagi dotyczące zjawiska resentymentu w ujęciu Schelera, Nietzschego i tzw. psychologii głębi. Ruch Filozoficzny 3 (3):437-457.