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  1. Babette Babich, The Genealogy of Morals and Right Reading: On the Nietzschean Aphorism and the Art of the Polemic.
    In: Christa Davis Acampora, ed., Nietzsche’s On the Genealogy of Morals: Critical Essays. (Lanham, Md., Rowman & Littlefield, 2006), pp. 177-190.
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  2. Johannes Balthasar (1987). On the Genealogy of a Morality. Philosophy and History 20 (2):141-142.
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  3. Daniel Conway (2009). Does That Sound Strange to You? : Education and Indirection in Essay III of on the Genealogy of Morality. In Jeffrey A. Metzger (ed.), Nietzsche, Nihilism, and the Philosophy of the Future. Continuum.
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  4. Claudia Crawford (1994). A Genealogy of Worlds According to Nietzsche. Philosophy and Rhetoric 27 (3):202 - 217.
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  5. Bryan Finken (2008). David Owen, Nietzsche's Genealogy of Morality. [REVIEW] Philosophy in Review 28:214-216.
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  6. Eugene Garver (1984). Aristotle's Genealogy of Morals. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 44 (4):471-492.
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  7. James Genone (2001). Genealogy and Will to Power. Revista Portuguesa de Filosofia 57 (2):285 - 298.
    Nietzsche's book On the Genealogy of Morals is often taken to be the high point of his critical project. Many of the positive aspects of Genealogy are often ignored, however, because they are difficult to explain. This article attempts to give an interpretation of the second essay of Genealogy in terms of Nietzsche's concept of will to power. On this basis, the second essay shows itself not to be simply an account of "bad conscience", but rather an account of the (...)
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  8. Robert Guay, On the Genealogy of Morals.
    1. We are unknown to ourselves, we knowing ones, we to our own selves, and for a good reason. We have never sought ourselves – so how could it happen, that one day we would find ourselves? Someone once correctly said: “where your treasure is, there your heart will be also”;1 our treasure is where the beehives of our knowledge are. We are always on the way to finding it; as winged creatures and honey-gatherers of the spirit, we truly care (...)
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  9. Robert Guay, On the Genealogy of Morals a Not-so-Brief Analysis of the PHE Excerpt.
    “The genealogy of morals” is, most famously, a pair of genealogies: that of the good/evil dichotomy in the First Treatise, and that of the bad conscience in the Second Treatise. But the straightforward presentation of these two narratives is subverted even before it begins. Nietzsche classifies the book not as a treatise or inquiry but as a “polemic”; voices interrupt the narrative to insist that much is left unsaid; the narratives are framed by, of all things, reflections on the scientific (...)
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  10. Robert Guay, The Philosophical Function of Genealogy.
    It is seldom in dispute that genealogy, or genealogical accounts are central to Nietzsche’s philosophic enterprise. The role that genealogy plays in Nietzsche’s thought is little understood, however, as is Nietzsche’s argumentation in general, and, for that matter, what Nietzsche might be arguing for. In this paper I attempt to summarize Nietzsche’s genealogical account of modern ethical practices and offer an explanation of the philosophical import of genealogy. The difficulties in coming to understand the philosophical function of genealogy are obvious. (...)
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  11. Robert B. Louden (1996). Toward a Genealogy of 'Deontology'. Journal of the History of Philosophy 34 (4):571-592.
    Toward a Genealogy of 'Deontology' ROBERT B. LOUDEN [A]ny choice of a conceptual scheme presupposes values. Hilary Putnam, Reason, Truth, and History tN Va'HICS AS ELS~.WHEI~, the basic categories used by writers to mark the conceptual terrain of their field profoundly affect readers' understanding of what is important within the field. And in ethics , most writers who habitually employ the currently accepted categories of their discipline have no knowledge of the particular history of these categories -- of who first (...)
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  12. Mark Migotti (1998). Slave Morality, Socrates, and the Bushmen: A Reading of the First Essay of on the Genealogy of Morals. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 58 (4):745-779.
    This paper raises three questions: (1) Can Nietzsche provide a satisfactory account of how the slave revolt could have begun to "poison the consciences" of masters? (2) Does Nietzsche's affinity for "master values" preclude him from acknowledging claims of justice that rest upon a sense of equality among human beings? and (3) How does Nietzsche's story fare when looked on as (at least in part) an empirical hypothesis? The first question is answered in the affirmative, the second in the negative, (...)
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  13. Paul S. Miklowitz (1995). Richard Schacht, Ed., "Nietzsche, Genealogy, Morality". [REVIEW] International Journal of Philosophical Studies 3 (2):380.
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  14. Iain Morrisson (2003). Nietzsche's Genealogy of Morality in the Human, All Too Human Series. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 11 (4):657 – 669.
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  15. Keith Ansell Pearson, Babette Babich, Eric Blondel, Daniel Conway, Ken Gemes, Jürgen Habermas, Salim Kemal, Paul S. Loeb, Mark Migotti, Wolfgang Müller-Lauter, Alexander Nehamas, David Owen, Robert Pippin, Aaron Ridley, Gary Shapiro, Alan Schrift, Tracy Strong, Christine Swanton & Yirmiyahu Yovel (2006). Nietzsche's on the Genealogy of Morals: Critical Essays. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    In this astonishingly rich volume, experts in ethics, epistemology, philosophy of mind, political theory, aesthetics, history, critical theory, and hermeneutics bring to light the best philosophical scholarship on what is arguably Nietzsche's most rewarding but most challenging text. Including essays that were commissioned specifically for the volume as well as essays revised and edited by their authors, this collection showcases definitive works that have shaped Nietzsche studies alongside new works of interest to students and experts alike. A lengthy introduction, annotated (...)
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  16. Adam Rosen-Carole (2013). Nietzsche's Modernism. Idealistic Studies 42 (2/3):161-225.
    “‘[C]onscience,’” Nietzsche suggests early in Essay Two of On the Genealogy of Morals, “has a long history and variety of forms behind it” . Glossing over the explicit equivocity and irony of such statements, most commentators presume that the primary ambition of GM is to reconstruct the emergence and in so doing denaturalize and denounce the reign of conscience, which is treated as equivalent to both bad conscience and slave morality. Such presumption has obscured the central claims, operations, and stakes (...)
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  17. Adam Rosen-Carole (2012). Nietzsche's Modernism: Dialectics and Genealogy. Idealistic Studies 42 (2-3):161-225.
    “‘[C]onscience,’” Nietzsche suggests early in Essay Two of On the Genealogy of Morals, “has a long history and variety of forms behind it” . Glossing over the explicit equivocity and irony of such statements, most commentators presume that the primary ambition of GM is to reconstruct the emergence and in so doing denaturalize and denounce the reign of conscience, which is treated as equivalent to both bad conscience and slave morality. Such presumption has obscured the central claims, operations, and stakes (...)
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  18. Paul van Tongeren (2011). Science and Philosophy in Nietzsche's Genealogy of Morality. In Marco Brusotti, Günter Abel & Helmut Heit (eds.), Nietzsches Wissenschaftsphilosophie. Degruyter. 73.
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  19. Richard White (1988). The Return of the Master: An Interpretation of Nietzsche's "Genealogy of Morals". Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 48 (4):683-696.
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Nietzsche: The Birth of Tragedy
  1. Vinod Acharya (2015). Science, Culture and Philosophy: The Relation Between Human, All Too Human and Nietzsche's Early Thought. Comparative and Continental Philosophy 7 (1):18-28.
    The goal of this article is to trace the transformations in Nietzsche’s early thinking that led to the ideas published in Human, All Too Human, the first book of his mature philosophy. In contrast to his early works, in which he sides with art and philosophy in criticizing the scientific culture of his time, Nietzsche, in Human, All Too Human, hails the methodology of science as a way to overcome the metaphysical delusions of philosophy, art, and religion. However, in disagreement (...)
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  2. D. C. B. (1961). Review of Engel, The Problem of Tragedy. [REVIEW] Review of Metaphysics 14 (4):723-723.
  3. Johannes Balthasar (1990). Metaphysics, Art and Language in Early Works of Nietzsche. Philosophy and History 23 (2):116-116.
  4. Andreas Dorschel (1987). Die Idee der ‘Einswerdung’ in Wagners Tristan. In Heinz-Klaus Metzger & Rainer Riehn (eds.), Richard Wagner, Tristan und Isolde. edition text + kritik. 19-25.
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  5. Friedrich Nietzsche, Die Geburt der Tragödie (German).
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  6. M. S. Silk & J. P. Stern (1981). Nietzsche on Tragedy. Cambridge University Press.
    This is the first comprehensive study of Nietzsche's earliest (and extraordinary) book, The Birth of Tragedy (1872). When he wrote it, Nietzsche was a Greek scholar, a friend and champion of Wagner, and a philosopher in the making. His book has been very influential and widely read, but has always posed great difficulties for readers because of the particular way Nietzsche brings his ancient and modern interests together. The proper appreciation of such a work requires access to ideas that cross (...)
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  7. J. T. (1968). Review of The Birth of Tragedy and The Case of Wagner (Kaufmann, Tr.). [REVIEW] Review of Metaphysics 21 (3):558-558.
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Nietzsche: The Untimely Meditations
  1. Mark Alfano (2010). The Tenacity of the Intentional Prior to the Genealogy. Journal of Nietzsche Studies 40:29-46.
    I have argued elsewhere that the psychological aspects of Nietzsche’s later works are best understood from a psychodynamic point of view. Nietzsche holds a view I dubbed the tenacity of the intentional (T): when an intentional state loses its object, a new object replaces the original; the state does not disappear entirely. In this essay I amend and clarify (T) to (T``): When an intentional state with a sub-propositional object loses its object, the affective component of the state persists without (...)
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  2. Friedrich Nietzsche, On the Use and Abuse of History for Life.
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  3. Friedrich Nietzsche, Thoughts Out of Season Part I.
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Nietzsche: Dawn
  1. Ruth Abbey (2000). Nietzsche's Middle Period. Oxford University Press.
    Ruth Abbey presents a close study of Nietzsche's works, Human, All Too Human, Daybreak, and The Gay Science. Although these middle period works tend to be neglected in commentaries on Nietzsche, they repay careful attention. Abbey's commentary brings to light important differences across Nietzsche's oeuvre that have gone unnoticed, filling a serious gap in the literature.
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  2. Ruth Abbey (1996). Beyond Misogyny and Metaphor: Women in Nietzsche's Middle Period. Journal of the History of Philosophy 34 (2):233-256.
    This article proposes a third way of reading Nietzsche's remarks on women, one that goes beyond misogyny and metaphor. Taking the depiction of women in the works of the middle period at face value shows that these works neither entirely demean women nor exclude them from the higher life. Nietzsche's middle period comprises HAH (1879-80, which includes "Assorted Opinions and Maxims" and "The Wanderer and His Shadow"), D (1881) and GS (1882). The works of this period do not disqualify women (...)
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  3. Keith Ansell-Pearson (2011). Beyond Compassion: On Nietzsche's Moral Therapy in Dawn. [REVIEW] Continental Philosophy Review 44 (2):179-204.
    In this essay I seek to show that a philosophy of modesty informs core aspects of both Nietzsche’s critique of morality and what he intends to replace morality with, namely, an ethics of self-cultivation. To demonstrate this I focus on Dawn: Thoughts on the Prejudices of Morality, a largely neglected text in his corpus where Nietzsche carries out a quite wide-ranging critique of morality, including Mitleid. It is one of Nietzsche’s most experimental works and is best read, I claim, as (...)
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  4. Keith Ansell-Pearson & Rebecca Bamford (forthcoming). Nietzsche’s Dawn: Philosophy as a Way of Living. Wiley-Blackwell.
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  5. Rebecca Bamford (2014). Mood and Aphorism in Nietzsche’s Campaign Against Morality. Pli: The Warwick Journal of Philosophy 25 (55-76).
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  6. Rebecca Bamford (2012). Daybreak. In Paul C. Bishop (ed.), A Companion to Friedrich Nietzsche: Life and Works. Boydell & Brewer [Camden House].
    I provide a critical interpretation of Morgenröthe: Gedanken über die moralischen Vorurteile that identifies the key philosophical work done by Nietzsche in this text, as well as presenting the text as a type of medical narrative. I show how Nietzsche engages with three main questions, drawing thematic connections between themes of physical and psychological health and of ethics, in order to develop a foundation for his critical transvaluation project: First, what is the nature of, and relationship between psycho-physiological and cultural (...)
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  7. Friedrich Nietzsche, The Dawn.
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Nietzsche: Human, All Too Human
  1. Ruth Abbey (2000). Nietzsche's Middle Period. Oxford University Press.
    Ruth Abbey presents a close study of Nietzsche's works, Human, All Too Human, Daybreak, and The Gay Science. Although these middle period works tend to be neglected in commentaries on Nietzsche, they repay careful attention. Abbey's commentary brings to light important differences across Nietzsche's oeuvre that have gone unnoticed, filling a serious gap in the literature.
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  2. Vinod Acharya (2015). Science, Culture and Philosophy: The Relation Between Human, All Too Human and Nietzsche's Early Thought. Comparative and Continental Philosophy 7 (1):18-28.
    The goal of this article is to trace the transformations in Nietzsche’s early thinking that led to the ideas published in Human, All Too Human, the first book of his mature philosophy. In contrast to his early works, in which he sides with art and philosophy in criticizing the scientific culture of his time, Nietzsche, in Human, All Too Human, hails the methodology of science as a way to overcome the metaphysical delusions of philosophy, art, and religion. However, in disagreement (...)
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  3. David B. Allison (2005). Nietzsche's Aesthetic Taste for Moral Metacritique. Symposium: The Canadian Journal of Continental Philosophy 9 (2):153-167.
  4. Friedrich Nietzsche, The Wanderer and His Shadow.
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  5. Friedrich Nietzsche (2014). Menschliches, Allzumenschliches 2. Felix Meiner Verlag Gmbh.
    Für die Neue Ausgabe seiner philosophischen Schriften 1886 erhob Nietzsche die 1879/1880 als Anhänge zu seinem ersten "Buch für freie Geister" publizierten Aphorismen über "Vermischte Meinungen und Sprüche" und "Der Wanderer und sein Schatten" zu einem eigenständigen zweiten Band seiner freigeistigen Betrachtungen unter dem Titel "Menschliches, Allzumenschliches"._1885 faßte Friedrich Nietzsche den Entschluß, eine Neue Ausgabe seiner Schriften erscheinen zu lassen, die »das Eigene und Unvergleichliche in diesen Werken« herausstellen sollte. Diesem Konzept folgt auch die von Claus-Artur Scheier neu herausgegebene Ausgabe (...)
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  6. Christoph Schuringa (2013). Nietzsche and the Unfolding of Mind. Nietzscheforschung 20 (1):279-287.
  7. Raymond Aaron Younis (1998). German Essays on Religion. Journal of Religion 78 (1):141-143.
Nietzsche: The Gay Science
  1. Ruth Abbey (2000). Nietzsche's Middle Period. Oxford University Press.
    Ruth Abbey presents a close study of Nietzsche's works, Human, All Too Human, Daybreak, and The Gay Science. Although these middle period works tend to be neglected in commentaries on Nietzsche, they repay careful attention. Abbey's commentary brings to light important differences across Nietzsche's oeuvre that have gone unnoticed, filling a serious gap in the literature.
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  2. Robert Burch (2002). Comic Relief. Review of Metaphysics 56 (1):174-176.
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  3. Andreas Dorschel (2008). Moral als Problem. Friedrich Nietzsche: Fröhliche Wissenschaft § 345. Zeitschrift Für Didaktik der Philosophie Und Ethik 30 (1):56-61.
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  4. Pierre Klossowski & Russell Ford (2007). Such a Deathly Desire. State University of New York Press.
    Provocative essays on language, literature, and the aesthetics of embodiment.
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Nietzsche: Genealogy of Morals
  1. Mark Alfano (forthcoming). Genealogy Revisited. [REVIEW] Journal of Moral Philosophy.
    “Another Nietzsche’s On the Genealogy of Morality?” one might be excused for asking at the sight of Simon May’s new collection. This volume has to contend for shelf space with homonymic monographs by Lawrence Hatab (2008) and David Owen (2007), as well as Daniel Conway’s (2008) Nietzsche’s On the Genealogy of Morals, a compilation of the same name edited by Christa Acampora (2006), and Brian Leiter’s Nietzsche on Morality (2002). Add to this that Hatab contributes to May’s collection, Owen and (...)
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  2. Mark Alfano (2013). Simon May (Ed.), Nietzsche's On the Genealogy of Morality: A Critical Guide (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2011), 345 Pages. ISBN: 9780521518802 (Hbk.). Hardback: $99.00. [REVIEW] Journal of Moral Philosophy 10 (5):692-694.
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  3. Barry Allen (1999). Nietzsche's Genealogy. International Studies in Philosophy 31 (2):140-141.
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